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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 2005- » 2005 (November-December) » Archive through November 21, 2005 » Help with a couple of translations? « Previous Next »

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Liz Aisling McDonald (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 69.140.139.52
Posted on Saturday, November 19, 2005 - 04:50 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Okay, first off, I'd like to note that these two translations are quite random-seeming and have absolutely nothing to do with each other. Hehe. Anyway, it'd be great if someone could help me-- I'm (sort of) starting learning the language, but I'm nowhere near the point where I can translate and/or say anything useful. So a little help would be wonderful!

Firstly: I play this online game where you own a kennel and train dogs and such. I want my my kennel to be called "Anamchara Kennels," except with the "kennels" part in Irish too. I know the word for kennel is "conchró," but seeing as I've misplaced my foicloir póca, I'm not sure of the plural.

Secondly: I need to translate a few lines of poetry...
Your being here is killing me
'Cause you're taking my breath away,
Hold me, dying, in your arms,
I'll gladly throw my life away.

Anyway, I'm sorry if this is asking alot, but it would be really helpful if someone could translate this stuff for me, or even just some help in translating would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!

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sgm (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 213.6.15.194
Posted on Saturday, November 19, 2005 - 07:31 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Foclóir Scoile lists "conchró" as a m4 noun and adds the plural with ~ite = conchróite
I'm not sure whether the genetive case comes into play with this construction, though.

Stefan

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Liz Aisling McDonald (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 69.140.139.52
Posted on Saturday, November 19, 2005 - 07:55 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Ok, that makes sense. Thank you!

And to anyone else reading this (because I can't go back and edit the post...), I've changed my mind about the second one (the poem thing)-- I don't need a translation after all.

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Robert (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 87.192.251.165
Posted on Saturday, November 19, 2005 - 08:18 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

I would have thought conchróite was a strong plural with the genitive taking the same form as the null sing:

conchró = kennel

doras an chonchró = door of the kennel

The diff been that lenition would occur for the masc gen sing

cró = is a pen
con must be some form that dog/hound took a long time ago. Dennis, what's da story?

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Dennis
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Username: Dennis

Post Number: 625
Registered: 02-2005


Posted on Saturday, November 19, 2005 - 08:58 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Con- has been the form of cú used in compound words ever since Old Irish. Mar shampla:

confadh = rabies < con- + bath (death) [the identity of the second element is a little controversial]

conriocht = werewolf < con- + richt (form, shape)

And in personal names such as Conchobhar (hound lover), Conmhac, Conghal, etc.

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Fear_na_mbróg
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Username: Fear_na_mbróg

Post Number: 835
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Sunday, November 20, 2005 - 10:12 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Your being here is killing me
'Cause you're taking my breath away,
Hold me, dying, in your arms,
I'll gladly throw my life away.

Tá do bheith anseo do mo mharú
Toisc go bhfuil tú ag tabhairt m'anáil chun siúil (Maybe I'm badly translating an idiom?)
(Hold) mé, ag fáil báis, i do lámha
Caithfidh mé mo shaol uaim agus fáilte.

Can't find an Irish word for "hold".

Fáilte Roimh Cheartúcháin



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