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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2003 (April-June) » 1999 » Vocabulary Question. « Previous Next »

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Patrick (1cust63.tnt13.bos2.da.uu.net - 208.254.160.63)
Posted on Friday, August 20, 1999 - 09:01 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Could anyone out there please tell me what Firin
and Ithimse mean. Mas e do thoil e!

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Ropaire
Posted on Sunday, August 22, 1999 - 05:49 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Firín (with a fada on the second 'i') means little man or men, also manikin or dwarf.

Ithimse means 'I eat' and is emphatic: implies that maybe you or he isn't eating, but I am.

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Patrick (1cust143.tnt3.bos2.da.uu.net - 153.36.79.143)
Posted on Sunday, August 22, 1999 - 08:31 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Go raibh maith agat, A Ropaire.

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Ropaire (1cust141.tnt9.nyc3.da.uu.net - 63.23.128.141)
Posted on Monday, September 06, 1999 - 03:08 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Little man only, not little men. That would be firíní. Sorry.

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KAREN
Posted on Friday, November 12, 1999 - 03:16 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

COULD ANYONE TELL ME HOW TO WRITE "HAPPY BIRTHDAY, FATHER....." FOR AN IRISH PRIEST AND A BLESSING FOR HIS CARD
MAS E CO THOIL E KAREN

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Kay (dialup-0932.dublin.iol.ie - 193.203.147.164)
Posted on Saturday, November 13, 1999 - 08:16 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Lá breith sona duit, a athair.
Go maire tú an céad. -may you live to be a hundred.

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KAREN (1cust45.tnt1.toms-river.nj.da.uu.net - 63.21.71.45)
Posted on Wednesday, November 17, 1999 - 12:34 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

DEAR KAY
THANK YOU SO MUCH, AGUS GO MAIRE TU' AN CEAD'
KAREN

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Irene
Posted on Friday, November 26, 1999 - 01:28 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Could someone tell me what the following words mean.
cen fath
slan go foill
slainte
slan leat or leit
failte

thank you much!

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Aonghus
Posted on Friday, November 26, 1999 - 02:26 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

cén fáth : why? (What reason)
slan go foill : slán go fóill : goodbye for now
slainte : sláinte : health (or your health when used as a toast)
slan leat or leit : slán leat : goodbye (lit. safety with you on your way; the traditional answer is slán agat: safety stay with you)
failte : fáilte : welcome

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Mary Simonsen
Posted on Friday, December 10, 1999 - 01:27 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

I am trying to find a name for my boat. Can anyone tell me how to say a gaelic word/phrase for "her way" or "good life". Thank you. Mary

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Aonghus
Posted on Friday, December 10, 1999 - 02:23 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

"her way" a slí
"her own way" a slí féin
"good life" déa saol (or "saol maith")

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claire (gw.hmoa.isdn.hunt.ezwv.com - 199.184.251.12)
Posted on Friday, December 10, 1999 - 03:00 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Could someone please remind me how to say "a thousand welcomes"?

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