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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2004 (April-June) » More than one way of saying, How are you? « Previous Next »

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Lesa Bauman (152.163.252.163 - 152.163.252.163)
Posted on Wednesday, April 07, 2004 - 06:57 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I was wondering why thier is more than one way of saying How are you? There is three ways and at the end each one says a different thing like (Connemara) another (Ulster) and last (Munster) does anyone know what they mean?

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Fear na mBróg (159.134.103.64 - 159.134.103.64)
Posted on Thursday, April 08, 2004 - 03:11 am:   Edit Post Print Post

How are you?
How do you do?
What's the story/craic/buzz?
How's she cutting?
Hello
Hi
Hey

That's why there's more than one way.

Conas atá tú? = How are you?
Cén chaoi ina bhfuil tú? = What way are you?


There all just variations on "Hello".

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..... (24.69.255.246 - 24.69.255.246)
Posted on Thursday, April 08, 2004 - 04:49 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Connemara is the west of Ireland;
Ulster is the north;
Munster is the south.
Each area has their own preferred way to ask "How are you?".

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Mary (24.185.210.123 - 24.185.210.123)
Posted on Thursday, April 08, 2004 - 10:40 am:   Edit Post Print Post

How ya doin? - NY
Wha' up? - NY
Que pasa? - NY

Howdy - Texas

How y'all doing? - Somewhere in the south

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Lesa (152.163.252.163 - 152.163.252.163)
Posted on Thursday, April 08, 2004 - 02:22 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Thank you everyone for the help!

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