mainoff.gif
lastdyoff.gif
lastwkoff.gif
treeoff.gif
searchoff.gif
helpoff.gif
contactoff.gif
creditsoff.gif
homeoff.gif


The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2004 (April-June) » What dialect? « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Brigid_CloverMoon (12.42.230.66 - 12.42.230.66)
Posted on Wednesday, March 31, 2004 - 05:34 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Can anyone tell me what dialect the book "Progress in Irish" teaches? Go raibh maith agat.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

T. MacEoghain (24.86.209.241 - 24.86.209.241)
Posted on Thursday, April 01, 2004 - 12:51 am:   Edit Post Print Post

I assume you mean the Máiréad Ní Ghráda book?
Seems to be standardised Irish, a "compromise" of the different dialects. Maybe someone else would have another opinion...?
A good source for grammar/excercises, I find.
-T.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Brigid_CloverMoon (209.173.118.172 - 209.173.118.172)
Posted on Thursday, April 01, 2004 - 12:49 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Yes that's the book I am referring to. Its a helpfuk book for sure.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Toma/s (198.22.236.230 - 198.22.236.230)
Posted on Thursday, April 01, 2004 - 05:34 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

An Caighdeán = Standard Irish. It is a compromise as "T" says. -- Toma/s

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Brigid_CloverMoon (209.173.119.215 - 209.173.119.215)
Posted on Thursday, April 01, 2004 - 08:39 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Go raibh maith agaibh. Does anyone know of any resources for Munster Irish?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Chris (161.28.161.15 - 161.28.161.15)
Posted on Friday, April 02, 2004 - 10:06 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Well, there is the Pimsleur CD set... It's done in the Muster dialect, but it's very elementary and there is no written documentation for that which you are learning.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bradford (216.16.15.66 - 216.16.15.66)
Posted on Friday, April 02, 2004 - 10:53 am:   Edit Post Print Post

You could also check out http://www.gaeltalk.net. It's an online course and I believe it's presented in Munster Irish. I don't know much about it but it does look interesting.

- Bradford

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Fear na mBróg (159.134.101.38 - 159.134.101.38)
Posted on Friday, April 02, 2004 - 10:54 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Why isn't there a Leinster dialect?!

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Brigid_CloverMoon (209.173.118.192 - 209.173.118.192)
Posted on Friday, April 02, 2004 - 12:31 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Someone onve told me that the Teach Yourself set by O'Se is Munster, is this ture? Yes why isn't there a Leinster dialect?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Seosamh Mac Muirí (193.1.100.104 - 193.1.100.104)
Posted on Friday, April 02, 2004 - 01:41 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

There is a Leinster dialect if one considers the natural surviving pronounciation of placenames and a modern excellent speaker of Irish with a natural Leinster phonology. That is, to combine a word perfect command of Irish and native speech (plus accent) of one raised with local speech, be it English, hence acquiring the inherited phonology of Leinster (via English).

What might be felt to be a peculiar word-stress can be heard amongst some young speakers on Raidió na Life, but it is not peculiar when it is viewed alongside the natural pronounciation by some in the farming community of local placenames in rural south county Dublin.

For a great collection of references, go down on the Ciarán Ó Duibhín list to sources at no. 6

http://www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/~oduibhin/oirthear/biblio.txt

Particularly:
* Piatt, Donn S.:
"Gaedhilg na Midhe", An tUltach 14:7 (8/1937) 5 (Tomás Mac Eochagáin).

Piatt, Donn S.:
____: "Giotaí de Ghaeilg dhúchasach na Midhe", An tUltach 29:6 (6/1952) 11-12.

And more interesting:

Laoide, Seosamh: "The Leinster dialect", An Claidheamh Soluis 12:40 (10/12/1910) 21; 12:43 (31/12/1910) 5-6; 12:48 (4/2/1911) 5-6.

Piatt, Donn S.: Gaelic Dialects of Leinster (1933) (inc. South Dublin, Wicklow, Kildare, Laois, Offaly, North and West Wexford, Kilkenny, Carlow; North Dublin, Westmeath).

Piatt ____ [Ps. Laighneach]: "Áth Cliath is Cill Mhanntain", An tUltach 10:5 () 6; 10:7 () 4.

Piatt ____: "Gaeilge na Mí", An tUltach 44:9 (9/1967) 9-10.

Williams, N J A: "The Irish language in County Offaly", Offaly: history and society (c1999).

If I were from Dublin, I would delve into both Rinn na Déise and East Ulster plus taking Cín Lae Amhlaoibh instead of television as a night-cap.

As I see it, I have on very few occasions listened to what I consider a Leinster dialect from one or two excellent speakers.
I myself pronounce a few words of it now and again any time I utter for oldtime's sake 'Baile Boch' instead of 'Baile Bocht' if I'm in the area. One can see it, in petrified form, on the street signs at Ballybough road.

Slán go fóill.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Fear na mBróg (213.94.240.91 - 213.94.240.91)
Posted on Friday, April 02, 2004 - 03:28 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

That really wrecked my head when I was starting out learning An Ghaeilge, that all the tapes and all the radio shows and televisions shows were in a bogger accent. The reason I didn't bring it up is that I figured that accent problems were to be expected with learning a language; For example, if I was learning French, I'd be speaking it with an Irish Dublin accent.
Anyway, I love to hear An Ghaeilge spoken in my accent, makes me feel more at home.
But suprising, at my Irish oral, I enjoyed speaking to my examiner who had a Cork accent. Variety is the spice of life!

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jonas (213.243.178.128 - 213.243.178.128)
Posted on Sunday, April 04, 2004 - 07:43 am:   Edit Post Print Post

I don't know the origin of the myth that Ó Sé's Teach Yourself Irish is in Munster Irish. Nothing is further from the truth, I can guarantee you.

The reason that there aren't any Leinster dialect alongside Munster, Connacht and Ulster is the sad fact that Irish died out as a community language long ago in Leinster while it lives in the other three Cúig

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Seosamh Mac Muirí (193.1.100.104 - 193.1.100.104)
Posted on Sunday, April 04, 2004 - 12:47 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Sé do bheatha chughainn ar ais a Jonas.

Add Your Message Here
Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.


©Daltaí na Gaeilge