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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2003 (January-June) » Veni, Vidi, Vici?? « Previous Next »

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James (168.192.57.109 - 168.192.57.109)
Posted on Tuesday, January 21, 2003 - 05:23 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I've stumbled onto a group of confusing words from a pronunciation/comprehension standpoint.

Tagaim = I come

Tugaim = I give

Tuigaim = I understand

I'm rendering them as such: Tah-gim, Tuhg-im and Tig-im (Open to more accurate phonetic renderings if anyone is more versed or adept at it--I'm pretty weak in that area) If my rendering is accurate, it would seem that these would be nearly indistinguishable from one another when encountered in natural speech. Am I right or am I way off base?

Provided my conjugation is correct it strikes me that it is a nice parallel to the Latin Veni, Vidi, Vici and I find it quite applicable to this site. I came to it, I began to contribute to it and now--I understand. I come, I give, I understand. The Zen of Gaeilge :)

Forgive my philosophical meanderings -sorry--it's rainy and dreary. blame it on the weather. (They laughed at Joyce, too, you know!!!)

Le meas,

James

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alec1 (62.254.104.10 - 62.254.104.10)
Posted on Tuesday, January 21, 2003 - 07:24 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I guess theymight be the same in a kinda way as

true

through

threw


And they sound alot more similar than the Irish verbs you mentioned-which in day to day speech would never be mistaken for each other either in terms of sound and context.

Nice Post Doe

(or is that though)

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.162 - 193.122.47.162)
Posted on Tuesday, January 21, 2003 - 08:01 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Measaim gurb é an Fraincis an teanga is measa le messy fuaimeanna. Is fuath liom í a labhairt ach is breá liom í a chloisteáil. Ní bhíonn a lán deacrachtaí mar atá luaite agat leis an Ghaeilge.

I think French is the worst language for messy sounds. I hate to speak it but I love to listen to it. There aren't many difficulties such as you mentioned with Irish.

Féach an abairt seo:

Les jeunes jeunesses jaunes jouent un jeu avec leurs yeux.

Go dtí Lá na Luain ní bheidh mé in ann an teanga diabhalta praiseach sin a labhairt.

Until doomsday I'll never be able to speak that devilish messy language.

B'fhearr liom an Ghaeilge cruinn soléir:
I prefer clear precise Irish:

D'ith damh dubh ubh amh ar neamh.
(A black ox ate a raw egg in heaven.)

Arsa Doug beag bog: "Rug gob beag bog gog beag bog."
(Said small soft Doug: ""A small soft mouth took a small soft egg.")

Go mbéadh seacht shliocht ag sliocht do shleachta.
(May your children's children have seven children).

Slán tamall,

Oliver.

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Pádraig (63.175.172.234 - 63.175.172.234)
Posted on Tuesday, January 21, 2003 - 10:07 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Gaslighting?

A Dhoug, where's the "ubh" in that casfhocal?
Eaten by a celestial bovine?
Seriously, is "gog" another word for egg?

There's an old, old, very old American film that starred Charles Boyer about a husband who sets out to convince his spouse she's going crazy. It's called "Gaslight." Hence the term, "gaslighting."

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.178 - 193.122.47.178)
Posted on Tuesday, January 21, 2003 - 10:24 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Yup,

gog = ubh.

I just thought I'd tag a few tongue twisters onto the end of mymessage for a laff.

Slán

Oliver.

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