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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2002 (July-December) » Knocknagow « Previous Next »

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Dennis Leyden (dell-fegyb.uncg.edu - 152.13.196.199)
Posted on Monday, August 26, 2002 - 02:50 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I have been reading the 19th-century Knocknagow (which I understand was very popular in Éire back then and is reputed to be an accurate description of life back then). I have two questions:

(1) The characters often remark "wisha" which my regular English dictionary says is derived from "ó + muisce" and which is used to indicate surprise. But I can't find muisce in my foclóir Gaeilge. Does anyone know this phrase? And is it still common today?

(2) The title of the book, Knocknagow, would seem to be from something like "cnoc na gcomha" which looks like "hill of the ...". Is anyone familiar with the place? Is it fictitious? Does "gow" mean anything?

Go raith maith agaibh!

Dennis

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Jim (207.79.68.232)
Posted on Monday, August 26, 2002 - 05:31 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Dennis,

Let me take a stab at this,

1. muise! (muhsha) = indeed!

2. I don't know about mhuise (wuhsha)

3. I'm very unsure about Kocknagow which would be anglicized version of the original place name, however I think I have seen "gownagh" as an anglicized version of "gamhna" (calves) or gamhain (calf). (Moygownagh= Maith Gamhna = blessed calves?)

-Jim

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Brien Hoye (ptd-24-198-45-40.maine.rr.com - 24.198.45.40)
Posted on Saturday, September 14, 2002 - 06:47 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

a mhuise would be a polite way of saying a Mhuire which would be calling out the Virgin's name which would be very impolite to say the least.

Brían

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