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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2003 (April-June) » 1999 » Just need some help with FREEDOM « Previous Next »

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Julia (bg-tc-ppp510.monmouth.com - 209.191.63.70)
Posted on Sunday, September 19, 1999 - 09:14 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

I am needing some help in trying to track down an Irish word and was
wondering if you might be of assistance. The word I am looking for means,
"Freedom" But the meaning is much deeper than "freedom of the press, etc.."
It means, freedom from bondage, been set free, etc." I have heard that in
the south of Ireland, this word could possibly be used in a church service?
Almost like a cry of thankfulness... I hope this helps and would greatly
appreciate a reply.

Julia.

PS. The reason I am inquiring is that in the very near future I am getting a
border collie and I was attempting to think of some great Irish names...
Could you throw in your vote for a name??? I need all the help I can get!
Honestly, I lived in Ireland a few years back and I absolutely fell in love
with the land and the people. Take care! Cheers.

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Seosamh
Posted on Monday, September 20, 1999 - 01:42 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

The word you are looking for is probably 'saoirse'. It's pronounced 'SEER-shuh'.

There's a vocative case in Irish for direct address: 'A Shaoirse!' you would say to the dog (uh HEER-shuh). But I would keep it simple and call her/him Saoirse.

Do NOT let AOL know you are doing this, especially if you have an account with them! :-)The word has strange significance for them and brings out their most sinister nature. (See other postings on this topic.) Dia idir sinn agus AOL.

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