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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 2005- » 2007 (March-April) » Archive through April 21, 2007 » Help with translation « Previous Next »

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(Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 207.200.116.199
Posted on Tuesday, April 17, 2007 - 01:25 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Could I get some help translating these lyrics to Irish please. I am just beginning with Irish (heck i ain't even that good with english and i been trying to speak that for almost 40 years) so take it easy on me.

"you're everything I want
you're everything I need
you can't be everything to everyone
but you're everything to me"

My attempt is:
tá tú rud guaím
tá tú rud uaim
ní tá tú rud do dhuine
ach tá tú rud do mé

Go raibh maith agaibh. ~Poke

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 5122
Registered: 08-2004


Posted on Tuesday, April 17, 2007 - 03:13 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Is tusa gach is mian liom
Is tusa gach is gá dom
ní tig leat bheith i'd uile do cách
ach is tú m'uilese

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Lughaidh
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Username: Lughaidh

Post Number: 1621
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Tuesday, April 17, 2007 - 04:44 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

"do cHách"

Could also use "the a of totality":

Is tusa ar mian liom
Is tusa ar gá dom...

Learn Irish pronunciation here: www.phouka.com/gaelic/sounds/sounds.htm

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 5126
Registered: 08-2004


Posted on Tuesday, April 17, 2007 - 04:56 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Is dócha é. Sin a bhí agam ar dtús (ar mian liom) ach bhí cuma lom air le hais an Bhéarla.

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(Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 207.200.116.199
Posted on Tuesday, April 17, 2007 - 05:03 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

A Aonghus.
Go raibh maith agat. this is great. I understand what you have said but could you help me with a few parts?

tig leat

i'd

m'uilese

I also tried to register but did not receive an e-mail, does it take long or did I do something wrong? ~Poke

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 5128
Registered: 08-2004


Posted on Tuesday, April 17, 2007 - 05:07 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

tig leat = is féidir leat
i'd = i do
m'uilese = mo + uile + se (treisiú/emphasis)

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Mac_léinn
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Username: Mac_léinn

Post Number: 451
Registered: 01-2007


Posted on Tuesday, April 17, 2007 - 05:15 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Scríobh Poke: I also tried to register but did not receive an e-mail, does it take long or did I do something wrong?

A Poke, a chara, you can speed up the process by sending me an express registration fee via Pay Pal. I'll send you the info if you're interested. Just kidding!

It does take a finite time to get registered. If you don't get registered by, say tomorrow or so, you may want to send an e-mail to this Forum's Adminstrator, by using the Contact link shown on the left.

Failte romhat,

Mac Léinn

(Message edited by mac_léinn on April 17, 2007)

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/teachyourselfirish
http://ga.wikipedia.org

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(Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 207.200.116.199
Posted on Tuesday, April 17, 2007 - 07:39 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

A Aonghus, tuigim.
Thanks for the information(Aonghus & Mac Léinn) if you're ever in Denver (cad é mar déarfá?) pints are on me. ~Poke

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Mac_léinn
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Username: Mac_léinn

Post Number: 452
Registered: 01-2007


Posted on Tuesday, April 17, 2007 - 10:28 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

if you're ever in Denver (cad é mar déarfá?) pints are on me.

Má bhíonn sibh i nDenver go deo, tá piontaí orm. (B'fhéidir? - Maybe?)

Just practicing my Irish. FRC-GRMA

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/teachyourselfirish
http://ga.wikipedia.org

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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 5129
Registered: 08-2004


Posted on Wednesday, April 18, 2007 - 08:28 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Má bhíonn sibh riamh i nDenver, fúmsa atá sé na piontaí a cheannach.

I don't know that the "on me" idiom translates.

go deo - forever
riamh - ever

(An important difference, even if one loves Denver!).




Ar éigin go mbeidh mé i nDenver. Is annamh (dhá uair go dtí seo) a fhágaim an Eoraip.

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(Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 207.200.116.199
Posted on Wednesday, April 18, 2007 - 09:41 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Ar éigin go mbeidh mé i nDenver. Is annamh (dhá uair go dtí seo) a fhágaim an Eoraip.

translation attempt
if someday it happens I'm in Denver. Be it rarely (twice up to now)the reason is I'm in Europe.

I'm just guessing about the last part(?). ~Poke

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Mac_léinn
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Username: Mac_léinn

Post Number: 454
Registered: 01-2007


Posted on Wednesday, April 18, 2007 - 10:19 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Go raibh maith agat a Aonghuis. In his English-Irish Dictionary, De Bhaldraithe indicates:

ever, adv I (a) (Of past time) Riamh. Did you ever see her? an bhfacais riamh í? ....................

(b) (Of future time) Go deo, go brách; choiche. If he ever comes, má thaggan sé go deo, choiche.

When I initially typed my statement in the thread above, I was thinking that go deo meant forever, as you have indicated.

Mar sin, a chairde tá dha ceist agam:

1. Why would De Bhaldraithe use go deo for the meaning of ever?

2. I never saw the spelling bhfacais before? Is it a dialectical variation?

Go raibh maith agaibh agus FRC.

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/teachyourselfirish
http://ga.wikipedia.org

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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 5133
Registered: 08-2004


Posted on Wednesday, April 18, 2007 - 11:52 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

1. Semantics matter.
Má bhíonn sibh i nDenver go deo If you are forever in Denver
Má thagann sibh go Denver go deo If you ever come to Denver

But I still prefer my version!

2. Sea, Gaolainn atá ann.



ar éigean (le deacracht (ar éigean a chreidim é; beo ar éigin)). i. It is unlikely that I will come to Denver.

annamh [aidiacht den chéad díochlaonadh]
nach dtarlaíonn go minic, neamhchoitianta

I rarely (twice so far) leave Europe

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Mac_léinn
Member
Username: Mac_léinn

Post Number: 457
Registered: 01-2007


Posted on Wednesday, April 18, 2007 - 12:08 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Go raibh maith agat a Aonghuis. Tuigim anois. Is fearr liomsa "riamh" freisin.

Má bhíonn sibh i nDenver go deo. Ba mórán piontaí iad!

FRC-GRMA

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/teachyourselfirish
http://ga.wikipedia.org

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Fear_na_mbróg
Member
Username: Fear_na_mbróg

Post Number: 1486
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Thursday, April 19, 2007 - 06:51 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

There's something about "i" becoming "in" before proper names but I never quite understood it, (i.e. in Denver).

-- Fáilte Roimh Cheartú --
Mura mbíonn téarma Gaeilge agaibh ar rud éigin, bígí cruthaitheach! Ná téigí i muinín focail Bhéarla a úsáid, údar truaillithe é sin dod chuid cainte.

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Daithí (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 83.131.200.48
Posted on Thursday, April 19, 2007 - 03:39 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Yes, in the 'Learning Irish' by M. Ó Sidheal, I'm not quite sure which lesson, I read once that in phrases such as:
Iriseoir atá in Liam (=Tá Liam ina iriseoir, Iriseoir ab ea Liam) 'i' shows up as 'in'. There's no explanation why is that.
However, it's seems that for some reason people prefer to say e.g. 'in Bríd' than 'i mBríd'. This might result from the fact that 'i' is the only preposition in Irish that triggers urú on the directly following word (with no intervening article), so the eclipsed names are rather rare, and consequently, sound weird.
I suppose this can be compared to the situation in Scottish Gaelic, where there's no urú at all and there appears an 'n' at the end of the preceding word instead: G.pl. nan caoran (=na gcaorach, of the sheep). Obviously, this process has been far more comprehensive in Scottish, exceptionless actually...

Daithí

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Lughaidh
Member
Username: Lughaidh

Post Number: 1627
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Friday, April 20, 2007 - 06:54 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

In Gaelic, of the sheep is nan caorach, not *nan caoran... ;-)

Learn Irish pronunciation here: www.phouka.com/gaelic/sounds/sounds.htm



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