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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 2005- » 2007 (January-February) » Archive through February 22, 2007 » Group project? « Previous Next »

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Dennis
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Username: Dennis

Post Number: 2620
Registered: 02-2005


Posted on Wednesday, February 14, 2007 - 10:43 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Posts in recent days have included the words cadramán, raiteog, cliúsaí, which mean respectively (using the definitions in FGB): stubborn, obstinate person; hussy; philanderer. The Irish language has a huge trove of words that describe the appearance or behavior of persons, and FGB contains most of them! A few more examples, to illustrate:

stoithneachán = dishevelled, tousle-haired person
blagadán = bald person
catachán = person with curly hair
geancachán = snub-nosed person
smugachán = snotty-nosed person
cluasachán = long-eared person
mantachán = gap-toothed person
plucaire = puffy-cheeked person
dúdaire = long-necked person
smigeadán = person with a prominent chin

Now for the proposal! A lot of these words are hard to access from English. The project would simply be for us to start at page one of FGB, go through a few pages line by line, and note down all the "person terms". Post what you've found and at what word you stopped, and then someone else could pick up where you left off. It would take a while to get through all of FGB, but taking it in small bites would make it enjoyable. The results could be transfered to a separate web page as we go, where they would be searchable using English key words. The English definition could be minimal initially, just an out-take or paraphrase of the FGB entry (which might also be a good idea for copyright reasons, too). Once the words go to their permanent look-up site, some of us could work through them fairly quickly, expanding the definitions to include more key words. For example, if you look at "crosachán" in FGB, the definition is "Pock-marked, dirty-faced person." Our entry could mention "acne scars" and perhaps "small pox".

Any interest?

"An seanchas gearr,
an seanchas is fearr."


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(Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 75.82.133.105
Posted on Wednesday, February 14, 2007 - 11:56 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Ní thagann sé ón bhfoclóir ach cloisim 'lúdramán' agus 'amadán' sa chaint go minic, fiú nuair a bhíonn daoine ag labhairt i mBéarla. Ní úsáidim na téarmaí go minic ach feictear dom go n-oireann siad do dhaoine do daoine atá 'faux' ar go leor bhealaí (leisciúil agus seafóideach).

Lá Valentín maith do mo chairde anseo. Tá mé ag cepadh gur féidir linn Féile 'Imbolg' a chaitheamh isteach ann chomh maith agus an bhliain ghealaí ag tosnú.

Ná iarr an iomarca orm anois le bhúr thoil. Níl mé ach ag oscailt an doras beagáinín go bhfeicfidh mé an bhfuil sé slán agus socair istigh anseo agus níl mé ag iarraidh na gárdaí a bheith i mo dhiaidh mar a bhagair duine éiginnt le déanaí.
Má tá drochfhreagra ann, gabhfaidh mé ar ais ag staidéar anseo.

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Mac_léinn
Member
Username: Mac_léinn

Post Number: 193
Registered: 01-2007


Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 09:45 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Tá suim agam.

abarlach f. Slovenly person, slut, slattern (an untidy, dirty woman.)

abhac m. Dwarf

ábharaí m. materialist

abhlóir m. Buffoon, fool; boor. 2. Confused, bewildered, person.

abhógai m. Bounder (an obtrusive, ill-bred man; a person who bounds), trickster.

Last word checked: abhras.

I thought I would take a try at the first three pages. Perhaps my attempts above could be used as examples of how not to approach this project. For example:

1. Should we list the gender?
2. Should we bold the headword?
3. Should we expand on the English definitions, some of which I never knew before, like "slattern" or "bounder," both of which I had to look up in an English dictionary?
4. Should we list words like abhac (dwarf) which describe more than a person's characteristics, but describe their physical nature?
5. Should we have two persons working on a certain range of pages, so that one person can check the other person's entries for misspellings, ommissions, etc? (Sorry if I'm too negative, but I'm an engineer and I live by Murphy's Law.)

These are just ideas, good or bad, that I thought I would mention. I don't like drivin' the bus, but I would like a seat on it. We only have 1,306 pages left to go!

(Message edited by mac_léinn on February 15, 2007)

Fáilte roimh cheartúcháin, go raibh céad maith agaibh.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/teachyourselfirish
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/irishlinguistics

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 5049
Registered: 08-2004


Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 10:38 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

3. Maybe link to dictionary.com
5. Absolutely (speaking as another engineer)

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Maidhc_Ó_g
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Username: Maidhc_Ó_g

Post Number: 321
Registered: 05-2005
Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 11:14 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

1 and 4 Yes.

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BRN (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 159.134.220.219
Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 11:45 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Here I make a distinction between 'proper noun' (i.e. normal 'pointing-to' noun) and 'qualitative noun with socially contextualised meaning'. Please forgive the terminology.

There were also times when I was not sure to leave out or not, and sometimes there were expressions that were like compounds, so I put them in.

I was going to joke about Mac Léinn and gender, and then it turns out you do indeed want them...

As for gender, all I know that I had a free day today, and it took me 6.5 hours with only one 20 min break to do it. Granted I got tired near the end, but if we allow 4 hours for 72 pages (1/18 of dictionary), then add other elements like explantions and gender, plus than consider that people will normally be at other things,, then...I'll let a mathematician work out the variables, but I wonder if too much is packed in, will it ever be done? People have kids etc.

Parsing is hard work, although granted some are more sure than others. Also, 2 or 3 doing the same letter is a good idea.



Aerthóir –simpleton
Agaill –crabby type
Agóid –crabby (or scold, but this is not clear if this is the exact usage)
Agróir – suitor, pleader; avenger
Áibhéalaí –an exxagerator
Áibhirseoir –adverserary [possibly a proper noun]
Aigne –advocate [proper noun?]
Aighneasóir –argumentative type
Aill fir [compound] –craggyman, powerful fellow
Áilleánach –a dandy
Áilteoir –joker, clown [note: seems to be a simple nominative tag]
Aimleoir –malformed person, fucked up
Ainchríostaí –non-beliver (in Christ), mean person (as in stingy)
Ainciseoir –vexed type of person
Aineolaí –greenhorn
Aingí ~ leanbh/seanduine aingí –vexed kid/old man [compunded]
Aingiall –unreasonable person

Ainle –vexed type; whinger or complainer kid
Airdeallaí –alert type [not sure abourt this]
Airí –deserving person
Airitheoir –clear perceptive type
Airleacán –playboy ~ airleacán linbh –playful child
Aisléir –trickster; manipulator of information
Aitheach –surly type
Aithriseoir –imitator [although this may be in reference to one that initates rather than an anthropomorphical quality that is held as intrinsic to the person, i.e. bíonn sé ina aithriseoir vs. ‘intrinsic aithriseoir’ like a shapeshifter or chameleon]
Allait –flabby, shapeless person
Alltán –wild or feral person
Alpán –morphically chunky person
Amadán –male egit
Amaid –female ejit
Amhas –hooligan [if we accept it as a state as well as a proper noun] ~ amhas bheaga –unruly children
Amhasóir –hooligan

Amhrasán –suspecious type [is this a state of being or a generality?]
Amhtais –ungainly type
Amhulchach (literary) –beardless type
Amlóg –foolish or awkward female
Amlóir –foolish or awkward male
Amparán –ungainly or helpless type
Amplachán –greedy type
Amscaí ~ duine amscaí –untidy person
Anabaí ~ duine anabaí – a soft shite; childish person; vexed type
Anacróir –wretched one (via distress contingencies or environment it seems)
Anairí –ungrateful person
Anás –needy type; clumsy type
Anastán –clumsy person
Ancaire –tubby type
Anchúinse –freak; scoundrel [again not sure if this is correct here]
Anglais –lilylivered man or boy
Anglán –bad tempered type
Anglálaí [as above]

Anrachán –greedy type
Ánrata (lit) –valiant; warlike
Ansmachtaí –bully [might just be proper noun]
Anstrólaí –quimsical person [note: in my Hiberno-English, dról/droll means boring, but in Dineen it is more a sort of delightful mild trickster]
Antlachán –grabber [might be just the device for grabbing tho]
Anusual –low born
Aonarán –single person [circumstantial?]
Arc ~arc nimhe –spiteful little creature
Árchú (lit) –dog or war, warrior
Argónaí –arguer [proper noun?]

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Dennis
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Username: Dennis

Post Number: 2621
Registered: 02-2005


Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 11:48 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

1. Should we list the gender?

That info can be added, if decide to, during the revision process. I think the point is to just unearth the words in the first pass. Once we have them, we can go back to FGB and verfiy the spelling, etc., and add the gender.

2. Should we bold the headword?

I don't think it's necessary at this point, esp. since it takes a lot of key strokes.

3. Should we expand on the English definitions, some of which I never knew before, like "slattern" or "bounder," both of which I had to look up in an English dictionary?

OK, but don't overdo it! For example, "a person who bounds" is not really relevant to "abhógaí".

4. Should we list words like abhac (dwarf) which describe more than a person's characteristics, but describe their physical nature?

Yes, we want all the words like "maolagán" (crop-haired person, "skin head"). But some words such as "abhac = dwarf" are easily found in an English-Irish dictionary; they're sufficiently mainstream that we probably don't need to bother with them. It's a grey area.

5. Should we have two persons working on a certain range of pages, so that one person can check the other person's entries for misspellings, ommissions, etc?

Every word should be reviewed when it goes to the permanent site, esp. for spelling!

Those are my thoughts. Thanks for starting the ball rolling, Mac. Now, who can design and host the website?

"An seanchas gearr,
an seanchas is fearr."


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BRN (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 159.134.220.219
Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 12:03 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Ps, that is, I wrote in a notebook, then typed it into a computer, then counted the lines to check for ommissions -if you type directly into the computer it would save more time.The DIL, Dinneen, and Ó Dónaill are all meant to be out soon, so cut n' paste would be better, but I would not hold the breath

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Mícheál
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Username: Mícheál

Post Number: 270
Registered: 11-2004


Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 12:06 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

I would like to help too, but I do not yet have FGB. I may be able to pick up a copy at the immersion weekend in Esopus. If not, I would like to help in other ways with the project.

Maidhc

Maidhc (as Nua-Bhaile i gConnecticut)
Má bhíonn amhras ort téigh chun na leabharlainne - Kate Charles
Fáilte roimh cheartú

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Mac_léinn
Member
Username: Mac_léinn

Post Number: 197
Registered: 01-2007


Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 12:07 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Parsing is hard work, although granted some are more sure than others. Also, 2 or 3 doing the same letter is a good idea.
I like the letter idea, especially having more than one person pore over the data. Everyone can choose their favorite letter, first come, first serve - I choose Z!

Fáilte roimh cheartúcháin, go raibh céad maith agaibh.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/teachyourselfirish
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/irishlinguistics

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Dennis
Member
Username: Dennis

Post Number: 2622
Registered: 02-2005


Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 12:12 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Tús maith, leath na hoibre. Go raibh maith agat as na focail sin uilig, Barney!

Amadán –male egit
Amaid –female ejit
Amhas –hooligan [if we accept it as a state as well as a proper noun] ~ amhas bheaga –unruly children
Amhasóir –hooligan
Amhrasán –suspecious type [is this a state of being or a generality?]
Amhtais –ungainly type


The words are all sound and well found. There is some proofing and editing need:

Amadán - male idiot
Amaid - female idiot
Amhas - hooligan
Amhasóir - hooligan
Amhrasán- suspicious person
Amhtais - ungainly person

And this selection raises some points of style that we should resolve at once:

1) Capitalize the headword? I think so.

2) Place hyphen between the headword and the definition? That seems like a good idea, but I'm open to other solutions. And if so, we should adhere to a single pattern, such as a single hyphen with a space before and after it. It sounds niggly, put we'll want that sort of visual consistency in the final product.

3) Adhere to a fixed formula of definition? For example, I think "type" is perfectly accurate, but FGB uses "person" throughout, so I think we should stick with that, without variation.

"An seanchas gearr,
an seanchas is fearr."


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Mac_léinn
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Username: Mac_léinn

Post Number: 198
Registered: 01-2007


Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 12:27 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

A Mhaidhc, often Daltaí has had the FGB for sale at events and weekends. I wonder if you could contact the siopadoir, Tómas, and ask reserve you a copy if they have one - just an ider.

Dennis, I see your point about bolding the headword - too many keystrokes. I like your ideas of capitalizing the headword (only?) and the pattern of (space), hyphen, (space). It looks (literally), as you show above, like a very useful pattern.

I think we would want to go through the data once and only once, so I think that capturing the gender during the first (and only?) pass through the data-extraction process would have some value. But I don't want to sound over-bearing on the issue; I thought I would just point out the single-pass-through data theory.

Well, I've already finished THREE letters of the alphabet, X,Y, and Z, whew! So, it's on to the letter Q for me!



(Message edited by mac_léinn on February 15, 2007)

Fáilte roimh cheartúcháin, go raibh céad maith agaibh.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/teachyourselfirish
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/irishlinguistics

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Dennis
Member
Username: Dennis

Post Number: 2623
Registered: 02-2005


Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 12:40 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

quote:

I think that capturing the gender during the first (and only?) pass through the data-extraction process would have some value.

OK. It would add just a few strokes to the process: space X . space where X = f or m. After the hyphen or before?

Amadán - m. male idiot
Amaid - f. female idiot

Amadán m. - male idiot
Amaid f. - female idiot

"An seanchas gearr,
an seanchas is fearr."


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Abigail
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Username: Abigail

Post Number: 221
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 12:51 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Count me in! I won't have time to contribute anything useful until next week though.

Just a thought: I'll probably type directly from FGB rather than transcribing them into a notebook. The more my entry format resembles FGB's, then, the faster it'll go. If it were up to me, I'd probably type something like:
abhógaí, m. bounder, trickster.
Whatever we do, I wouldn't capitalize anything just yet. Extra keystrokes, and it's trivial to do afterwards if we decide to present the information that way.

Right now I wouldn't be too worried about people's using different formats. It's important that the right information is included, and that spelling is correct (both in English and Irish), but it doesn't matter so much whether people use a hyphen or a colon, put spaces around it or don't, list the gender before or after the definition, etc. Once we get these collected into a text file somewhere, standardizing all that will be no trouble at all. I can whip together a couple of VEDIT macros to go through and do that in about ten minutes. (Consider this as my volunteering to do so, if it's wanted.)

Personally I don't care if we include gender or not. It's not much extra work to type (three characters?) but also not much use. I suspect over half of these are going to end in -án or -aí anyway! And if I don't know and can't guess, I'll just go look it up in FGB; for me, the main thing is that now I'll know there is such a word, which I otherwise wouldn't.

Tá fáilte roimh chuile cheartú!

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Mac_léinn
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Username: Mac_léinn

Post Number: 199
Registered: 01-2007


Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 01:24 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

I suppose whether gender is of much use is in the mind of the beholder. For advanced learners and fluent speakers, they probably either know the gender or can guess it, but if I may represent for the moment the lowest rank of beginners, of which I'm proud to be a member, I don't possess such skills so I see the inclusion of gender as important and adhering to the engineering principle of "do the job once" (single-pass-through theorem).

If it were up to me, I'd probably type something like: abhógaí, m. bounder, trickster.

I like this format and see that capitalizing or bolding the headword isn't needed, because of the positioning of the headword at the front is self-explanatory. It also contains the gender with only two additional keystrokes, e.g. "m."

Whichever way we go, gender or genderless, I'm fine with it. I just want you all to know that I've finished ANOTHER letter - Q. I'm now off to the letter J, which compared to the FOUR letters I've already completed, looks like a mountain of work ahead of me.

Fáilte roimh cheartúcháin, go raibh céad maith agaibh.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/teachyourselfirish
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/irishlinguistics

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Riona
Member
Username: Riona

Post Number: 962
Registered: 01-2006


Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 06:44 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

A Chairde,

This is a very neat idea. It will be really grand to see the finished product and say that I know those people who put it together and they're my friends. :)

A BhRN a chara, that was amazing. You must have had lots of time to compile that list and it was really comprehensive. I secretly liked the way you spelled idiot :). Now I know waht to call a female fool, for quite some time I thought it wasn't to be done since the only way I'd been told to do it turned out to be an inapropriate thing to say.
And I hope to truth that you, a BhRN, never meet malformed people since you have such a low opinion of themselves according to your definition explanation.

Beir bua agus beannacht

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Liz
Member
Username: Liz

Post Number: 258
Registered: 07-2005


Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 07:05 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Believe it or not, I've wanted to make a list like this for years. The Irish language has a large number of delightful words to describe people. I am willing to start typing in entries anytime. Should I start typing them in here?
Eventually, I can add words from Dinneen's (and maybe Mc Kinney's) Dictionary as well.

As far as the format, I favor putting the hyphen before the gender. This is somewhat similar to the format in FGB, but O'Dónaill used a comma rather than a hyphen.

quote:

Amadán - m. male idiot
Amaid - f. female idiot




I agree we should stick to the definition as written in the dictionary as much as possible.
We need people who know Hiberno-English (I'm an American and I have no idea what a 'bounder' is) to help us with some of these definitions.

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BRN (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 159.134.220.52
Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 07:05 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

No, the definitions around it such as for 'aimléis', and the term itself 'wretch; deformed person' suggested to me that the term carried the 'sematic weight' that justified its usage while in a rough draft. I might be wrong. It did not mean those suffering physical abnormalities are *-ed up, but that the term was expandable to that sense of been 'messed up'

I'd take it out of any on-line version, but I was happy to be finished and did not profread the english, only counted the lines

I only gave the time period to suggest that too much detail might kill the project over the long run. I was not in my part-time job today, so decided to give it a shot. I feared those in fulltime employment might get tired if too much formatting was included. Also, sometimes it is not clear what to put in, so I left in my comments to see how Dennis would remove or leave terms. Now I have a better understanding of those marginal cases.

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BRN (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 159.134.220.52
Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 07:15 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

An example I came accross was 'stripper' -I can't recall the form, but the other word is 'gamhnach', a cow that still has last years calf. If you did not know the term, you might think it was like a thing for removing green bark etc. I only guessed it was in realtion to the animal after

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Riona
Member
Username: Riona

Post Number: 963
Registered: 01-2006


Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 07:21 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Ta bron orm a BhRN,
It was wrong of me to assume that you were just adding that comment for fun and that it wasn't just another meaning for that term. I suppose we're now even at assuming things about each other without thinking hard on it. I think its neat that you spent so much time on the project. You'll no doubt be even cleverer than before because of your studying and copying down.

Beir bua agus beannacht

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Dennis
Member
Username: Dennis

Post Number: 2624
Registered: 02-2005


Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 08:23 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Dúirt Abigail:
quote:

If it were up to me, I'd probably type something like:
abhógaí, m. bounder, trickster.
Whatever we do, I wouldn't capitalize anything just yet. Extra keystrokes, and it's trivial to do afterwards if we decide to present the information that way.

I can see how all the headwords could be easily capitalized later, and I'll believe you about the rest. Tá áthas orm go bfhuil tú "istigh"!

Dúirt Liz:
quote:

I am willing to start typing in entries anytime. Should I start typing them in here?

Ar fheabhas! Bhí Liz agus mise agus beirt eile ag obair i gcomhar ar In Dúil Bélrai, gluais Shean-Ghaeilge atá ar fáil ar líne, an bhliain seo caite. Tá LIz go hiontach mar fhoclóirí. Tá an t-ádh orainn go mbeidh sí páirteach sa togra seo.

Maybe you should you just stake out a letter, Liz, now while the gettin' is good, and go right to work. We can all do the same. In fact, I'll claim R right now.

We can post the results here as we go. I'm willing to keep a running list of the input in the form of one long e-mail document: primitive but effective. Maybe someone has a better idea? Sooner or later, we're going to need a permanent web site to for our work product. I don't know if Sabhal Mór Ostaig would provide this or not, but we can check.

"An seanchas gearr,
an seanchas is fearr."


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Mac_léinn
Member
Username: Mac_léinn

Post Number: 202
Registered: 01-2007


Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 08:42 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Scríobh Liz: We need people who know Hiberno-English (I'm an American and I have no idea what a 'bounder' is)

Now I don't feel so bad knowing there's someone else who didn't know the meaning of bounder. And how about slattern? When I saw Aonghus' posting a few days ago which included this word, I thought it was a mispelling of the word "lantern!" .

The good news is that I found the definitions of both bounder and slattern at www.dictionary.com. But Liz makes an excellent point of having folks with Hiberno-English knowledge. In order for the non-Hiberno-English Americans among us to be able to participate, perhaps we should pair up (Item 5 of my list at the top of this thread) or have a Hiberno-English knowledgeable team leader review a number of sub-teams and/or pairs.

I'd also like to get started, so since this is Dennis' brainchild, I'll wait for the green light from him. In terms of formatting issues like to hyphenate or not hyphenate, we're lucky to have our resident mathematician/VEDIT guru on-board, if she's available, to generate the appropriate re-formatting algorithms Of course there are other software-engineering experts on-board but it's not my place to volunteer their expertise.

Still struggling through the letter J.

Oops, looks like this posting, which I just edited with this sentence, went in just after Dennis' above. Sorry about any confusion.

(Message edited by mac_léinn on February 15, 2007)

Mac Léinn as Nua-Gheirsí. Fáilte roimh cheartúcháin, go raibh céad maith agaibh.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/teachyourselfirish
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/irishlinguistics

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Dennis
Member
Username: Dennis

Post Number: 2626
Registered: 02-2005


Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 08:53 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

quote:

I'd also like to get started, so since this is Dennis' brainchild, I'll wait for the green light from him.

Togh litir (ceann seachas J, Q, X, Y, Z) agus luigh isteach ar an obair! Ach fainic, tá R agamsa!

Agus maidir le "bounder", ní focal Hiberno-English é. Bhí sé in úsáid go forleathan i Sasana sa naoú haois déag, an-chosúil le "cad".

"An seanchas gearr,
an seanchas is fearr."


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Liz
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Username: Liz

Post Number: 260
Registered: 07-2005


Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 09:44 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Tosnóidh mé ar an litir B anois díreach.

Báb - f. baby
Babaí - m. baby
Babaidín - m. waif
Babhdóir - m. matchmaker
Bacach - m. lame person

Before I do more typing, how does this format look? I didn't put in the entire dictionary entry, just the first definition.

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Abigail
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Username: Abigail

Post Number: 223
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 09:51 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Beidh G agamsa! (Cé nach mbeidh mé in ann tosnú air go dtí an seachtain seo chugainn.)

The only formatting I'd ask from anybody is
(1) that the headword be the first word on the line,
(2) that you put commas between word meanings,
(3) that gender be denoted by either m/f, masc/fem or masculine/feminine. Ní ghlacfar le "f/m" (= "fir/mná")!
(4) that any usage examples, like BRN's ~ airleacán linbh –playful child above, be placed inside parentheses, one set per example. (I don't think there'll be too many of these to worry about, though.)

No need for a hyphen, colon, etc. after the headword, and no need for a period after the gender abbreviation. Put them in if you like though, it won't matter. Put spaces around them, or don't. Capitalize anything you feel like, or don't. Put the gender before or after the word meanings, or in between two of them if you prefer - just not before the headword, please.

So this would be a minimalist entry for "abhógaí":
abhógaí m bounder, trickster

Or you can add any other window dressing you fancy:
AbHóGaÍ: Masculine - Bounder, Trickster
and I'll take care of it at the end.

I agree with Liz that definitions should be lifted straight from FGB at this point; we can always expand and explain later.

Tá fáilte roimh chuile cheartú!

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Abigail
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Username: Abigail

Post Number: 224
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 09:56 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Liz, I think your message must have come in while I was typing.

Before I do more typing, how does this format look? I didn't put in the entire dictionary entry, just the first definition.

Looks great! If you want to save a few keystrokes per word, feel free to omit capitalization and punctuation - but if you want to put them in I'm equally happy with that.

Tá fáilte roimh chuile cheartú!

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Dennis
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Username: Dennis

Post Number: 2627
Registered: 02-2005


Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 09:57 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Looks good, Liz. I wonder, however, if we want to include professions? If you look up "matchmaker" in de Bhaldraithe you'll find "babhdóir", so it's not hard to access. If we include it, would we also need to include "dochtúir, feirmeoir, baincéir" and the like? I personally think we should emphasize the nouns that are not so easy to find, like "rocaí = person with kinky hair". I don't think that's very easy to access from English.

"An seanchas gearr,
an seanchas is fearr."


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Dennis
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Username: Dennis

Post Number: 2628
Registered: 02-2005


Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 10:04 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

quote:

Or you can add any other window dressing you fancy:
AbHóGaÍ: Masculine - Bounder, Trickster
and I'll take care of it at the end.

Is binn liom an abairt dheireanach! An bhfuil tú ag rá freisin go mbeidh tú sásta na hiontrálacha uilig a bhuachailleacht dúinn?

"An seanchas gearr,
an seanchas is fearr."


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Liz
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Username: Liz

Post Number: 261
Registered: 07-2005


Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 10:07 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

I'll omit professions and punctuation. I'll type letter B on my word processing program so I can proofread it before I post it here. Proofreading earlier is always easier than catching and correcting errors later. Liz

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Mac_léinn
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Username: Mac_léinn

Post Number: 203
Registered: 01-2007


Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 10:15 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Togh litir (ceann seachas J, Q, X, Y, Z) agus luigh isteach ar an obair! Céard faoi W?

Dáiríre píre, tosnóidh mé ar an litir S.

Scéal grinn faoi cad. A few jobs ago, we had an open house, where we each had to wear badges. Mine said ENGINEER. But we also had badges for the people in Computer Aided Design and their badges prominently and simply indicated CAD. I don't think any of the wearers nor the badge maker knew what the word "cad" meant which just added to the humor of the situation.

Tá fhios agamsa, I should be working on the letter S but my dictionary's at work; I'll start tomorrow.

Mac Léinn as Nua-Gheirsí. Fáilte roimh cheartúcháin, go raibh céad maith agaibh.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/teachyourselfirish
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/irishlinguistics

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Abigail
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Username: Abigail

Post Number: 225
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 10:17 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

An bhfuil tú ag rá freisin go mbeidh tú sásta na hiontrálacha uilig a bhuachailleacht dúinn?
Cinnte, más sin is mian libh. Is cuma liom cé a bhailíos iad le linn an tionscnaimh, ach sa deireadh ní foláir dom iad a bheith agam i bhfoirm "plain text". (Tá doiciméidí Word, OpenOffice, srl. ceart go leor freisin - rud ar bith is féidir liom é a oscailt agus an téacs a bhaint as.)

Tá fáilte roimh chuile cheartú!

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Dennis
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Username: Dennis

Post Number: 2630
Registered: 02-2005


Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 10:21 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

quote:

my dictionary's at work

Tá do fhoclóir ag obair, agus tá tusa ag ligean do scíth? Tá an foclóir níos saothraí ná n t-úinéir. (Brón orm!)

"An seanchas gearr,
an seanchas is fearr."


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Mac_léinn
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Username: Mac_léinn

Post Number: 204
Registered: 01-2007


Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 10:26 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Dennis, it sounds like we're not going to include professions, if I understand your and Liz's remarks above. Tá mé ag dul "night-night", and you West-Coasters have three more hours of "fun" ahead of you, so if you could confirm that we are not including professions, that would be great. But which ever way you decide of course is fine with me.

Oíche mhaith.

Mac Léinn as Nua-Gheirsí. Fáilte roimh cheartúcháin, go raibh céad maith agaibh.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/teachyourselfirish
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/irishlinguistics

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Mac_léinn
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Username: Mac_léinn

Post Number: 205
Registered: 01-2007


Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 10:39 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

agus tá tusa ag ligean do scíth

Tá, agus ba mhaith liom ardú tuarastail!

Oíche mhaith!

Mac Léinn as Nua-Gheirsí. Fáilte roimh cheartúcháin, go raibh céad maith agaibh.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/teachyourselfirish
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/irishlinguistics

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Aaron
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Username: Aaron

Post Number: 100
Registered: 04-2005


Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 11:32 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

quote:

generate the appropriate re-formatting algorithms... Of course there are other software-engineering experts on-board but it's not my place to volunteer their expertise.



I'm no expert, but I can certainly work with a word list. I'm happy to offer any general algorithm skills I may have.

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Liz
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Username: Liz

Post Number: 262
Registered: 07-2005


Posted on Friday, February 16, 2007 - 12:17 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Seo ceist daoibh. Sainmhiniú ó FGB -

"Badhbh 1. War goddess Badhb chaointe, banshee 2. (child talk) Bogey-man 3.Vulture, carrion-crow 4. Scold"

Shall we ignore this type of entry in which the definition 'scold' describing a person is a secondary meaning?
Or write them in as "Badhbh f scold"?

I would favor the first option, ignoring this type of entry. But what do other people think?

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Dennis
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Username: Dennis

Post Number: 2631
Registered: 02-2005


Posted on Friday, February 16, 2007 - 12:44 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

quote:

"Badhbh f scold"?

I would favor the first option, ignoring this type of entry.

Ah no, I would hate to give up "badhbh = scold"! It has historical depth and richness and I've known it used that way -- yet it's not likely anyone would find it now, looking for the Irish for "scold". When in doubt, enter any good, juicy secondary meaning (as the sole definition for our purposes) and we can always discard it later if it is really off the mark.

"An seanchas gearr,
an seanchas is fearr."


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Mac_léinn
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Username: Mac_léinn

Post Number: 206
Registered: 01-2007


Posted on Friday, February 16, 2007 - 09:48 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Dennis,

Please clarify the scope of this project. For example, I just started on the letter S and came across the word Sabaitéir (saboteur). I need to know if words like this should be included. Next on my list is sábhadóir (sawyer). Should this word be included? For example, in the case of Liz's entry:

"Badhbh 1. War goddess Badhb chaointe, banshee 2. (child talk) Bogey-man 3.Vulture, carrion-crow 4. Scold"

Which definitions should be included? All of the definitions, 1,2,3,4, or just 4? I ask for clarification because if we're concerned about the extra keystroke for gender, there's going to be alot of extra keystrokes for occupations, etc, and it would be nice to know if we should eliminate them up-front.

Go raibh maith agat.

Mac Léinn as Nua-Gheirsí. Fáilte roimh cheartúcháin, go raibh céad maith agaibh.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/teachyourselfirish
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/irishlinguistics

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Dennis
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Username: Dennis

Post Number: 2634
Registered: 02-2005


Posted on Friday, February 16, 2007 - 10:40 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

quote:

I just started on the letter S and came across the word Sabaitéir (saboteur). I need to know if words like this should be included. Next on my list is sábhadóir (sawyer).

We won't include professions and avocations (not sure which "saboteur" falls under!), since they are generally fairly prosaic terms that can be found in an English-Irish dictionary. Now if you find something particularly outré, like "goat-roper", then let's have it!
quote:

"Badhbh 1. War goddess Badhb chaointe, banshee 2. (child talk) Bogey-man 3.Vulture, carrion-crow 4. Scold"

Which definitions should be included? All of the definitions, 1,2,3,4, or just 4?

Just 2 and 4, please.

"An seanchas gearr,
an seanchas is fearr."


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Mac_léinn
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Username: Mac_léinn

Post Number: 210
Registered: 01-2007


Posted on Friday, February 16, 2007 - 10:55 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Got it, thanks very much for the clarification and I'm getting to work on this project pronto. Just a side note, we had neighbors when I was growing up that would only come around when someone in the neighborhood had a picnic, or fruit to pick from one of the neighbors' cherry, peach, or plum trees. We called them the Vultures. But fortunately, I don't have the letter B so I don't have to grapple with whether to include that definition in Badhbh shown above.

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/vulture
(Entry 3)

Mac Léinn as Nua-Gheirsí. Fáilte roimh cheartúcháin, go raibh céad maith agaibh.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/teachyourselfirish
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/irishlinguistics

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Mac_léinn
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Username: Mac_léinn

Post Number: 211
Registered: 01-2007


Posted on Friday, February 16, 2007 - 12:01 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

A Abigail,

Scríobh tú thuas: (2) that you put commas between word meanings,

I learned a few months ago that there's a difference between a comma and a semicolon separating definitions for a given headword. That is, a comma between words indicates that the word before and after the comma are somewhat related to the same definition, where as a semicolon indicates that the succeeding word is a separate, unrelated definition. Here's an example:

saibhseálaí m inquisitive person; pesterer

Tá súil agam nach saibhseálaí mé, but could you clarify whether we should be using semicolons as used in FGB, or is it better to replace the semicolons with commas?

Go raibh maith agat.

(Message edited by mac_léinn on February 16, 2007)

Mac Léinn as Nua-Gheirsí. Fáilte roimh cheartúcháin, go raibh céad maith agaibh.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/teachyourselfirish
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BRN (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 159.134.221.26
Posted on Friday, February 16, 2007 - 12:20 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

I'm going to pick the vowels (e, o, u, & i), if no on else minds, will use Abigail's terms of reference, remove any obviously unneeded stuff, use colon/semi-colon distinction and see how it goes.

The question is, who wants C?

Riona,
I suppose we are!

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Mac_léinn
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Username: Mac_léinn

Post Number: 212
Registered: 01-2007


Posted on Friday, February 16, 2007 - 12:41 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Who wants C? It's 200 pages long! I thought S was long at 160 pages. The next letter that I'm choosing is either K or W!

Mac Léinn as Nua-Gheirsí. Fáilte roimh cheartúcháin, go raibh céad maith agaibh.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/teachyourselfirish
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/irishlinguistics

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BRN (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 159.134.221.26
Posted on Friday, February 16, 2007 - 12:56 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Here's a tip:

Get the little An Gúm dictionary, and make an ordinal list of lengths according of letters C atop, Z ashore. Pick em early and short! It should be representative of the big one...

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Dennis
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Username: Dennis

Post Number: 2639
Registered: 02-2005


Posted on Saturday, February 17, 2007 - 12:25 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Here's the first installment of R:

rábaire - m loose-limbed, active person; dashing fellow
rábálaí - m fast unmethodical worker; sprinter
rabhcánaí - m ditty singer, songster
rabhdalam - m giddy, irresponsible, person
racaitín - m urchin
racánaí - m brawler, rowdy
rachmasaí - m wealthy person; capitalist
rachta fir - m big strong man
radaire - m ranter, prater; strolling reveller; trifler, flirt
radalach - f thin lanky person; slatternly person
ráflálaí - m rumour-monger; chatterer, gossip
raga - m worthless person
raga fir - m useless man
raga mná - m useless woman
ragaíoch - m useless person, ne'er-do-well
ragaire - m late-night rambler; strolling night-reveller
ragairneálaí - m reveller, roisterer; wastrel
ráibéad - m big hulking person
raibiléir - m dissolute person, rip
raibiléir mná - m harlot, hussy
raiblín - m miserable creature
raicleach - f brawling, obstreperous, woman; vixen, termagant
ráigí - m vagrant, vagabond; gadabout
ráigiúnach - m vagrant, vagabond; gadabout
raille - m rake, profligate
railliúnach - m corpulent person; strong clumsy fellow
railse fir - m tall thin man
raiméisí - m nonsensical talker
raimleálaí - m rambler
raimsce - m scapegrace, scamp
raingléir - m slow-moving person; dawdler
raipleachán - m worthless person; reprobate
raispín - m brat, rascal; miserable person, wretch
ráistéir - m roisterer; rake
raiteog - f hussy, flirt
ráitseach - f wanton woman
rálach - f loose woman, harlot; vulgar, unmannerly, woman
rama - m wretch
ramaid - m wretch
ramaire - m wretch
ramaiste - m wretch
ramásaí - m reciter of doggerel verse
rampaire - m stroller, sportive person, playboy
ramscéalaí - m silly talker
ránaí - m rangy person; thin lank person; loafer
rancásaí - m frolicsome, sportive, person
rantaeir - m rambler, rover
rásaí - m gadabout, vagrant; tale-bearer
rascail - m rascal
ráscán - m waggish, facetious person; irresponsible talker
rathlach - m big unkempt person

"An seanchas gearr,
an seanchas is fearr."


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Scathach
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Username: Scathach

Post Number: 13
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Saturday, February 17, 2007 - 12:33 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

I'll do C, unless someone has an objection and wants to do it.

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Dennis
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Username: Dennis

Post Number: 2640
Registered: 02-2005


Posted on Saturday, February 17, 2007 - 12:51 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Second installment of R:

réabóir reilige - m body-snatcher
reacaire - m gossip
reangartach - m lean, lanky, rawboned, person; scrawny creature
reanglamán - m long, lean, languid person
reathálaí - m fast talker, loquacious person
réice - m rake, rover
reigléasach - m recluse, anchorite
réitheach - m thin lanky person

riadaire - m old stager
rianaí - m wayfarer, wanderer
ribeog mná - f tiny woman
rídéalach - m lanky lifeless person
rífeálaí - m fusser; voluble, silly, talker
righneálaí - m lingerer, loiterer, dawdler; stubborn person
righneadóir - m lingerer, loiterer, dawdler; stubborn person
riglí - m impotent person
riglín - m impotent person
rinceálaí - m caperer, gamboller
ringiléad - f plump little woman
ríobóid - f ribald person
riteachán - m gorged person

"An seanchas gearr,
an seanchas is fearr."


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Dennis
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Username: Dennis

Post Number: 2641
Registered: 02-2005


Posted on Saturday, February 17, 2007 - 12:52 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

quote:

I'll do C

Maith thú! :-)

"An seanchas gearr,
an seanchas is fearr."


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Scathach
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Username: Scathach

Post Number: 14
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Saturday, February 17, 2007 - 02:27 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

CA

cabaí -(m) toothless person
cabaire -(m) babbler, loquacious person,
sunken-lipped, long-jawed person
cábánaí -(m) cabin dweller
cabóg -(f) toothless woman, gilb precocious child,
clodhopper, clown
cábúnach -(m) sexually impotent person
cac (m) ar oineach - mean, low-down person
cadhnaí(m) mna - bold, headstrong woman
cadramán - (m) stubborn, obstinate person, boor
cáfall - (m) patient, easy-going person
cág - (m) loquacious person
cágaire - (m) miser, hoarder
caibeálaí- (m) planter of seed
caibhdeog- (f) gap-toothed person, toothless person,
loquacious woman
caibíneach-(m) small-mouthed, sunken-lipped
caidéir -(m) idler
caidhp (f) fir - foolish fellow
caidhte (m) fir - a big man
caidir -(f) fat, slovenly woman
caifeach -(f) small faced woman
caile (m) daibhche - washerwoman
cailicéir -(m) captious person
caillichín -(m) little old woman, precocious girl
cailliúnaí -(m) spendthrift
caillteachán -(m) miserable, mean person
caillteog -(f) stingy woman, emaciated person
caimiléir -(m) dishonest person, crook
cainceachán -(m) large nosed person
cáinseach -(f) fault-finder (woman)
cánseoir -(m) fault-finder
cainteoir - (m) speaker
caipitlí - (m) capitalist
cairbtheach - (m) charioteer
cairdinéal - (m) cardinal
cairléalaí - (m) quarryman
caireamh - (m) leather-worker
cáirín - (m) bickerer, grinner, squabbler
fear cairte - (m) hawker
cairteoir - (m) map-maker
caisearbhán - (m) sour person
cáiseoir - (m) cheesemaker
caisleoir - (m) fort-builder
caistín - (m) cranky person
caiteachán - (m) thin, emaciated person
caiteog (f) thin, spent woman
cáiteoir - (m) winnower
calaitheoir - (m) ferryman
caldar (m) fir - robust man
caldar (m) mná - robust woman
callaire - (m) crier, bellman, loud talker, ranter
calmfhear - (m) strong, stalwart man
camadán - (m) bent, crooked person
camalóid - (m) tall, stooped person
campalaí - (m) camper
canncairt -(f) crank, cantankerous woman
cannadóir - (m) canner
canóin - (f) canon
canónaí - (m) canonist
canránaí - (m) grumbler
cantaire - (m) chanter, chorister
cantálaí - (m) grabber
cantalóir - m) peevish person, grumbler, crank
caobach - (f) lout, lumpish person
caoch - (m) blind person
caochadóir -(m) purblind creature
caochán - (m) purblind creature
caochóg - (f) purblind creature
caoilteamán - (m) thin person
caoladán (m) thin person
caoladóir ( m) basket-maker
caomhnóir -(m) guardian, patron, protector
caonaí - lone person
caorthanach - (f) fiery-tempered woman
carballán - (m) toothless person
cargálaí - (m) jostler, wrestler
carrachán - (m) scabby person
carrachán linbh - puny, wizened child
cársánaí - (m) wheezy person
casaoideoir -(m) complainer
catachán - (m) curly-haired person
catamán - (m) dead and alive person
cathaitheoir - (m) tempter, mischief-maker
catóg - (f) curly haired girl

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Lúircín (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 75.82.133.105
Posted on Saturday, February 17, 2007 - 02:39 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

L led' thoil, if no one else has it.
Is breá liom na focail

Lústaire - m fawner, flatterer,
Lúnadán - m person with awkward gait,
agus
níor mhaith liom bheith i mo
Lúmaire - m idler, blockhead

Bail ó Dhia ar an meitheal.

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Leabharbhách (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 75.82.133.105
Posted on Saturday, February 17, 2007 - 03:39 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

L - The first 10:
lábadán - (m) 1. muddy, grimy person, 2. boor
lacha - (f) fig. comely girl
láchán - (m) 1. smiling, wheedling child, 2. foolish, amiable person
lachóigín - (f) pretty girl
lachtaí - (m) nursling
lacstar - (m) idler, gadabout, playboy
ladhgaire - (m) boaster, braggart
ladhrálaí - (m) clawer, clutcher; groper, fumbler; meddler (Var. ladhraí)
ladrann - (m) robber, thief
ladúsaí - (m) pert talker; silly talker; wheedler

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Liz
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Username: Liz

Post Number: 264
Registered: 07-2005


Posted on Saturday, February 17, 2007 - 05:41 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Here's a start on letter B. The choice of what to include is somewhat arbitrary. I have generally not included professions, but I did include some spelling variations. I added an explanation of the uncommon word ‘bletherskate’.


báb - f. baby
babaí - m. baby
babaidín - m. waif
bacach - m. lame person; beggar; mean person, sponger; despicable person
bacachán - m lame person
bacaidí - m lame person
bacláimhíneach - m person crippled in hand or arm
badhbaire - m curser, scold
badhbóir – m curser; scold
badhbh – f scold; (child talk) bogey-man
badhgaire - m boaster, braggart
bagarlán - m dolt
bailbhín - m dummy, dolt
báiléir - m scold
báirseach - f scolding woman, shrew
báirseoir - m scolding, nagging person; incessant talker
báistíoch – m (newly-)baptized person; Christian; living person
balbhán - m dumb person; silent person; stammerer
balcaire - m strong, stocky person
balcán - m strong, stocky person
balpóg - m plump person
bánach - m fair-haired person, white person
banaí - m ladies’ man; lady-killer
bánaí - m albino
banchealgaire - f seductive woman, siren
bánchnis - f fair lady
banscál - f woman
baoiteálaí - m bait-setter; hanger-on
baothán - m fool, simpleton; fop
baothóg - f foolish, giddy girl
bapsóg – f frolicsome girl; precocious girl
barraí - m champion; superior person, arrogant person, bully
básachán - m dying, feeble creature
básadán - m dying, feeble creature
bastún - m lout
bataire - m stick-fighter; beater, smiter
bathlach - m lout, clumsy person
bé - f woman, maiden
beachtaí - m critical, captious person
beachtaire - m critical, captious person
beadaí - m lover of dainties, epicure

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Liz
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Username: Liz

Post Number: 265
Registered: 07-2005


Posted on Saturday, February 17, 2007 - 05:42 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Part 2 of letter B --

béadánaí - m slanderer, prater
béadchainteoir - m slanderer
beagadán - m diminutive person, little one
beagaidín - m diminutive person, little one
béalastán - m ranter
béalastrán m ranter
bearrachán - m close-cropped person; sharp-tongued person; innocent-looking rogue
bearránach - m annoying person; rogue
bearrthachán - m close-cropped person ; sharp-tongued person; innocent-looking rogue
béasach - f well-mannered, lady-like girl
béiceadán - m glutton; yeller, bawler
beithé - m laughing-stock
beithinseach - f very large person
bídeach - f tiny girl, woman
bíobha - m wrong-doer; enemy
bíogaire - m sprightly person
biorach - m sharp, tricky person
bithiúnach - m scoundrel
bladaire - m cajoler, flatterer
bladhmaire - m boaster, braggart
blagadán - m bald person
blaochán - m gourmand, glutton
blaoiscéir - m empty-headed person
blaoscánach - m big-, empty-, headed person
bleácach - m under-sized person; insignificant person
bleader – m bletherskate, a babbling foolish person
bleadrachán - m paunchy person, glutton; bletherskate, a babbling foolish person
bleaindí - m roundish person
bleaistéir - m glutton
bleid - m wheedler, loquacious person
bleidéir - m inquisitive person
bleidire – m cajoler, flatterer
bleitheach – m huge, fat person
bligeard – m blackguard
blióg - f milksop, effeminate person
bliteog – f well-groomed girl; effeminate person
bliústar – m blusterer
blocán – m stocky person; blockhead
blocaire – m stocky person
bobaide – m booby, clown
bobaire – m practical joker, trickster
boc – m buck, playboy, fellow, rascal
bocaí – m playboy, scamp
bocaileá – m playboy
bocailiú – m playboy
bocaileaidí – m playboy

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Liz
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Username: Liz

Post Number: 266
Registered: 07-2005


Posted on Saturday, February 17, 2007 - 05:43 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Part 3 of Letter B --

bochtán – m poor person, beggar; mean person
bochtóg – f poor woman, poor person, beggar
bod – m churl, lout
bodach – m churl, lout
bodachán - m diminutive of ‘bodách’; churl, lout
bodalach –m big ungainly young person
bodhar – m deaf person
bodhrán – m deaf person; slow-witted person, dullard
bodóg – f hefty young woman
bodóinseach – f lusty, foolish woman
bogchailín – f half-grown girl
bogóg – f soft person; softy
bogstócach – m half-grown youth
bóibéisí – m silly boaster
boicín – m diminutive of ‘boc’; gay spark, rake
boigéisí – m soft-hearted, gullible person
boilgíneach – m pot-bellied person
boimbealóir – m foolish talker
boirdréis mná – f gaudily-dressed woman
bóiricín – m bow-legged person
bóisceálaí – m boaster
boiteallach – m youth
bóithreoir – m road-walker; traveler, vagrant
boitseachán – m short, thickset person; assertive, bumptious person
bóitseachán – m short, thickset person; assertive, bumptious person
bolastar – m big, bulky person
bolgadán – m corpulent person
bollaire – m braggart
bollatach – m low-sized compactly-built man
bolmán – m windbag
bolscaire – m herald, crier; announcer; booster, publicist; ranter, blusterer; propagandist; blubberer
bolstaic – m sullen, morose person
bómán – m slow-witted person
bonnaí – m walker, trotter; footman, foot messenger
bonnaire – m walker, trotter; footman, foot messenger
bórachán – m bow-legged person
bornóg – f lumpish woman
bosachán – m flat-footed person
bothánaí – m frequenter of neighbors’ houses
bothántaí – m frequenter of neighbors’ houses
botúnaí – m blunderer
brabúsaí – m opportunist, exploiter; fault-finder
brácálaí – m toiler, drudge
bradaí – m pilferer, thief; person with prominent teeth
bragaire – m braggart

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Liz
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Username: Liz

Post Number: 267
Registered: 07-2005


Posted on Saturday, February 17, 2007 - 05:43 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Part 4 of Letter B --

braigléir – m haggler
braimleog – f fat, awkward woman, person
braimileog – f fat, awkward woman, person
braine – m head, leader
bramaire – m windbag, boaster
branán – m prince
braobaire – m rude, insolent person
brasaire – m lively, quick-spoken, talkative person
breabhsaire – m spruce, sprightly person
breabhsóg – f spruce, sprightly woman
breall – m blunderer, fool
breallaire – m silly talker, fool
breallálaí – m silly talker, fool
breallán – m ragged person; blunderer, fool
breallóg – f slattern; foolish, talkative woman
brealsún – m silly-looking person; blunderer, fool
breastaire – m flippant, unmannerly person
breoille – m naked person; lout
bríd – f maiden
bríde – f maiden
brín – m (in phrase brín óg) gay young man, gay bachelor
bríochtach – m strong, vigorous person
briogaid – f touchy, irritable person
briogaill – f touchy, irritable person
briotaire – m lisping person
briotachán – m lisping person
briotóg – f lisping woman
broc – m dirty-faced person; short thick-set person
brocachán – m dirty-faced person
brocais – m dirty-faced person
brocóg – f smudgy-faced girl
bródach – m favorite, pet; boyo
broghchán – m dirty person; mean, sordid person
brogús – m surly, humourless person
broicín – m diminutive of ‘broc’; sturdy little fellow; grizzled, grey-haired person
broicleach – m sturdy, plump, little person
broimseánaí – m windbag; rude person
broimsilín – m windbag; rude person
bróinteoir – m stout heavily-built person
bromaire – m windbag, boaster
bruachaire – m lounger; impudent person
bruachán – m stout low-sized person
bruadaire – m impudent person
brúisc – m rough, unmannerly person
brúiscéir – m rough, unmannerly person
bruithleach – m burly person

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Liz
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Username: Liz

Post Number: 268
Registered: 07-2005


Posted on Saturday, February 17, 2007 - 05:44 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Part 5 (last part) of Letter B --

bruithleachán – m person who sweats profusely; soft, good-for-nothing person
bruitheálach – m person who sweats profusely; soft, good-for-nothing person
bruithneog – f small plump woman
brúitíneach – m stumpy person; stuffy person
brusaire – m downy youth; saucy person; spruce, sprightly person
bruthaire – m hairy, unkempt person
buaiceálaí – m swaggerer, swank
buailtíneach – m farmyard worker; lout
bualsach – f slut
buanna – m billeted soldier; domineering person in household
buarthóir – m troubler, disturber
búbaire – m booby
búbaí – m booby
búbán – m booby
búilleach – m clod, cloddish person
builtéir – m sleek, fat person
buimbiléir – m foolish talker
buinín – m stumpy person
buinneachán – m mean, despicable person
buinneán – m tall, slender boy, girl
buíocán – m sallow-skinned person
buíóg – f woman of sallow complexion
búis – f corpulent woman
búiste – m sluggard; boor
bulcais – m clumsy person
bumaire – m bum; braggart
bunán – m stocky person
bunastán – m stocky person; obstinate person
bunbhean – f middle-aged woman; low-sized woman
bundallán – m tubby person
bundúnaí – m morose person; silly talker; restless, fidgety person
bunfhear – m middle-aged man; low-sized man; almost fully-grown man
bunfhréamh – m founder
burdúnaí – m tale-bearer; rhymer, epigrammatist
burla – m burly person; lumpish, unsociable person
burlamán – m burly, lumpish person
burlaimín – m burly, lumpish person
burlóg fír – f lump of a man
burlóg mná – f lump of a woman

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Dennis
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Username: Dennis

Post Number: 2643
Registered: 02-2005


Posted on Saturday, February 17, 2007 - 07:42 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Third and final installment of R:

rocaí - m person with crinkly, kinky, hair
ródaí - m wayfarer, rover
rógaire - m rogue
roiseálaí - m render, tearer; one who spouts off
rónadóir - m maker of, dealer in, haircloth; furrier; feather merchant
ropaire - m violent person; robber, scoundrel; highwayman
rothlam - m strayer, roamer
rua - m red-haired person
ruacán - m withered old person; boor
ruacán caillí - m crone
ruagaire - m chaser, hunter
ruagaire reatha - m vagabond, devil-may-care person
ruailleach - f slattern
ruainneog - f tiny person
ruainneog mná - f little wisp of a woman
Ruairí an mheán oíche - m fly-by-night
ruaiseog - f giddy, flighty, girl
ruanaidh - m strong man, champion (lit.)
ruathaire - m gadabout; rover; flighty, fickle, person
rúbóg de ghearrchaile - f big raw-boned girl
rúcán - m rough, raw-boned, person
ruibhseach - f sharp-tongued, abusive, woman; jilt, jade
ruifíneach - m ruffian
rúisceachán - m slovenly person
rúitíneach - m person with thick ankles
rúnchara - m confidant(e)
rúnsearc - m loved one, darling
rúpach (mná) - f big robust woman
rúpálaí - m strong unmethodical worker
rúscaire - m rough robust person; fast unmethodical worker; bruiser, bully
rúscthóir - m rough robust person; fast unmethodical worker; bruiser, bully

"An seanchas gearr,
an seanchas is fearr."


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Dennis
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Username: Dennis

Post Number: 2647
Registered: 02-2005


Posted on Saturday, February 17, 2007 - 11:59 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Seo agaibh N, ó thús go deireadh:

nagadán - m precocious youth
naí - m infant, babe
naí - f young, innocent, girl
naíonán - m infant
náireachán - m bashful, diffident, person
nascaire - m binder, fastener, linker
nathaí - m aphorist; witty person, wiseacre
nathair - m cunning treacherous person; snake

neach - m incorporeal, mysterious, being
néaladóir - m cloud-watcher, weather observer; furtive person, sneak, spy
neamhábharaí - m immaterialist
néamhann - m lovely young woman, dainty little girl; gem
neamhchinntí - m indeterminist
neamhdhuine - m nobody, nonentity
neamhláithrí - m absent person, absentee

nia - m warrior, champion (lit.)
nigear - m nigger
nimhneachán - m over-sensitive, touchy, person
niúdar neádar - m hesitant person; dead-and-alive person
nocht - m naked person, nude
nochtach - m naked person
nuálaí - m innovator
núscar náscar - m hesitant person, weak person
nuta (de dhuine) - m stumpy person

"An seanchas gearr,
an seanchas is fearr."


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BRN (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 159.134.220.144
Posted on Sunday, February 18, 2007 - 05:33 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Oi Nuta!

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Scathach
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Username: Scathach

Post Number: 18
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Sunday, February 18, 2007 - 11:24 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

CE

ceannaí - m buyer, purchaser
ceannaireach - m muntineer, rebel
ceannaire - m leader
ceannasaí - m commander
ceannrodaí - m leader, guide, pioneer
ceannsaitheoir - m appeaser, pacifier, tamer
ceanntúir - m centurian
ceapadóir - m shaper, moulder, composer, inventor
cearbhálaí - m carper, grumbler
ceardaí - m artisan, craftsman, artful person
ceardchummannaí - m trade-unionist
cearnóg - f stout woman
cearpantóir - m carpenter
cearrbhach - cardplayer, gambler
ceartaitheoir - m corrector, rectifer, reformer
cearthanach - m wisened old person
céasadóir - m crucifier, tormentor
céastúnach - m crucifer, torturer, executioner
ceatánaí - m awkward person, annoying, troublesome person
céile - m spouse, companion
fear chéile - husband
bean chéile - wife
céileann - f fair lady
céilíoch - m person fond of social visits
Ceilteach - m Celt
ceimiceoir - m chemist
ceirbíneach - m cripple
céirseach - f husky-voiced person, fair maiden
ceirteachán - m ragged person
ceithearn - f band of foot soldiers
ceithearn timpill - bodyguard
ceithearn choille - outlaw
ceithearnach - m strong, big-boned person, bigwig,
supporter
ceolbhuíon - f band of musicians
ceoltóir - m musician

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Caoimhín
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Username: Caoimhín

Post Number: 216
Registered: 01-1999


Posted on Sunday, February 18, 2007 - 11:48 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

We'd be happy to format and host the finished list.

Caoimhín

Tír gan teanga, tír gan anam.

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Dennis
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Username: Dennis

Post Number: 2648
Registered: 02-2005


Posted on Sunday, February 18, 2007 - 12:55 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

I think we've decided not to bother with professions and other common words that can be easily accessed from English. D'fhágfainn na focail seo a leanas ar lár. Ní dhéanann siad aon dochar, ach ní bheidh a gcomhghleacaithe ó na litreacha eile (B agus R mar shampla) ar an liosta.

ceannaí - m buyer, purchaser
ceannaire - m leader
ceapadóir - m shaper, moulder, composer, inventor
ceardaí - m artisan, craftsman, artful person
ceardchummannaí - m trade-unionist
cearpantóir - m carpenter
céile - m spouse, companion
fear chéile - husband
bean chéile - wife
Ceilteach - m Celt
ceimiceoir - m chemist
ceoltóir - m musician

Agus rinne tú "oops!" de na focail mhaithe seo a tháinig roimh "ceannaí":

céadbhunadh - m original inhabitants
céadsearc - m first love; dearest one
ceáfrálaí - m caperer
ceaifléir - m joker
ceaigín - m rotund little person
ceailis - m pot-bellied, pudgy person; untidy person
ceailiseog - f plump, pudgy, girl
ceairliciú - m puny person
cealgaire - m guileful person; beguiler, deceiver
cealgaí - m guileful person; beguiler, deceiver
ceallach - m recluse, hermit
ceamach - f ragged person; slattern, slut; rustic, lout
ceamach na luatha (buí) - f cinderella
ceamachán - m ragged person
ceamalach - m ungainly person; churl, lout
ceanán - m little darling, favourite

Seo cúpla focal eile a fuair mé i bhfolach idir "ceannaí" agus "ceoltóir":

céasánach - m person with narrow rump; runt
fear crua ceolmhar - m a hardy an spirited man

Please don't be put off by my beachtaíocht. That's what an eagarthóir is supposed to do, and I guess I'm the de facto eagarthóir here!

Go raibh maith agat as do chúnamh! Tá an chuid eile de C ag fanacht leat anois.

"An seanchas gearr,
an seanchas is fearr."


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Scathach
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Username: Scathach

Post Number: 19
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Sunday, February 18, 2007 - 01:03 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

CI

ciachánaí - m hoarse person
ciafart - m unkempt, dishevelled person
cianaí - m 1.sad, melancholy person 2.peeish, querulous person
ciapaire - m tormentor
ciardhuán - m dark-complexioned person
Ciarraíoch - m a native of Kerry
ciarsánaí - m grumbler
cídeog - f 1.a person who is easily imposed upon 2.spineless creature
cigilteán - m 1.ticklesome person 2.touchy person
cigire - m inspector
cílí - m bland, suave person. wily, cunning person
címe - m captive, prisoner
cincíseach - m 1.person born at Whitsuntide 2.an ill-starred person
ciníochaí - m racialist
cinnire - m person leading an animal by the head
cinniúnaí - m fatalist
cinsire - m censor
ciobarlán - m grimy person
cíocrachán - m greedy, hungry person
ciofarlán - m ragged, untidy person
ciolartan - m untidy person
ciolcán - m clumsy person, lout
ciontach - m offender, guilty person
ciontóir - m offender
cíoradóir - m comber
cíorlálaí - m searcher, rummager, tough customer
cíormhaire - m comber, comb-maker
cíosaí - m rent-payer
ciotachán- m left-handed person, awkward, clumsy person
cipe - m body of troops in close formation
círéic - f riotous, obstreperous person
cisteoir - m treasurer
cithineach - f lively, happy woman
cithréimeach - m maimed, deformed person
ciúnaitheoir - m pacifier

CL

clabaire - m open-mouthed person, garrulous person
clabhcánaí - m flat footed person
clabhstrálaí - m ungainly walker, shuffler
clabóg - f garrulous woman
cladaire - m villain, rogue, trickster
cladóir - m shore-dweller
clagaire - m noisy talker
claibhtéir - m lout
claibín - m garrulous person
claibseach - f garrulous woman
claimhseach - f woman leper
claimhseog - f mangy, dirty female
claimhteoir - m swordsman
cláiríneach - m deformed person
Cláiríneach - m Native of Clare
cláirseoir - m harpist
claiséir - m fat-buttocked person
claítheoir - m ditch-maker, fencer
claitseach - f slut, trollop
clamaire - m public crier
clamhaire - m biter, mangler, messy eater
clamhrán - m scabby wretch, insignificant person
clamhsánaí - m fault-finder, complainer
clampadóir - m clamper
clampróir - m wrangler, trouble-maker
clárach - m broad-faced person
cláróg - f small well-built woman
cleachtóir - m practitioner
cleamaire - m strawboy, mummer
cleamhnaí - m a relation by marriage
cleasaí - m 1.a playful person 2.trickster, crafty person 3.juggler, acrobat
cleataire - m noisy person
cleatrálaí - m clatterer
cleiteachán - m person of slight build
cleiteog mná - dainty, little woman
cleithire - m tricky person, rogue
cleithiúnaí - m dependant
cleitire - m person of very light build, light nimble
person
clí - m Bardic poet of the third order
cliabhadóir - m creel-maker
cliabhaire - m travelling poultry-dealer
cliabhrach - m person of a large frame
cliamhain - m son-in-law
cliant - m client
cliaraí - m Bard, ministrel, chorus-singer
cliathánaí - m winger
cliathóir - m hurdler, hurdle-maker
cliathramán - m thin, bony person
cliathreathaí - m hurdler
clifeartach - m tall, thin man
clingire - m bell ringer
cliobaire - m man of strong build
cliobóg - f big, strong girl
cliútach - m playboy, trickster
clochadóir - m stone-worker
clochrán - m recluse, one confined to house or bed
clóchuradóir - m type-setter
clódóir - m- dyer
cló-eagraí - m compositor
clogadán - m dunce
clogaire - m bell-ringer, bellman
clogáiste - m soft, fat person
clogarán - m prattler
clóghrafóir - m typographer
clógóinseach - f witless woman
cloigeog - f silly person
cloigis - f mob, riff-raff, witless woman
cloigneach - f dunce
cloíteoir - m subduer, conquerer
clóscríobhaí - m typist
closmar - m lout
cluanaire - m deceiver, flatterer
cluasachán - m long-eared person
cluasaí - m listener, eavesdropper
cluasánach - m listless, inattentive person, dullard
cluaslia - ear specialist
cluicheálaí - m loud talker, nagging person
cluicheoir - m gamester
clupais - f dowdy, untidy person

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Dennis
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Username: Dennis

Post Number: 2649
Registered: 02-2005


Posted on Sunday, February 18, 2007 - 01:04 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

quote:

We'd be happy to format and host the finished list.

Excellent! I'm keeping a running list of the entries. I'll hand that over to Liz le go mbeidh deis aici an t-iomlán a ghrinniú (is iontach an tsúil atá aici!), then it will go to Abigail so she can take a further editorial look, and make sure all the entries follow the same formula. At that point, it should be ready for you to work out the details of how to host it. Ceart go leor?

"An seanchas gearr,
an seanchas is fearr."


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Scathach
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Username: Scathach

Post Number: 20
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Sunday, February 18, 2007 - 01:17 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Fadhb ar bith Dennis, ba chóir go mbeadh chuile rud cuinn beacht. Tá sé díreach agam anois céard atá uait. Níl a fhios agam cén fáth a d'fhág mé na focail a luaigh tú as an áireamh. As an deifir tig an driopá, mar a deirtear. Conas a bheifeá na liostaí le 'CI' agus 'CL' a chur in eagar?

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Scathach
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Username: Scathach

Post Number: 21
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Sunday, February 18, 2007 - 01:19 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

As an deifir tig an driopás "oops arís"

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Dennis
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Username: Dennis

Post Number: 2650
Registered: 02-2005


Posted on Sunday, February 18, 2007 - 01:36 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Ci agus Cl an-deas, a Scathach. Ní bhacfainn féin le cúpla ceann acu, sin an méid:

Ciarraíoch - m a native of Kerry
cigire - m inspector
címe - m captive, prisoner [recte: cime]
cinsire - m censor
cisteoir - m treasurer
Cláiríneach - m Native of Clare
cláirseoir - m harpist
clí - m Bardic poet of the third order
cliant - m client
clóchuradóir - m type-setter
clódóir - m- dyer
cló-eagraí - m compositor
clóscríobhaí - m typist
cluaslia - ear specialist

GRMA aríst!

"An seanchas gearr,
an seanchas is fearr."


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Scathach
Member
Username: Scathach

Post Number: 22
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Sunday, February 18, 2007 - 03:01 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

CN

cnábaire - m tall, stooped person
cnádaí - m person of stunted growth
cnádánaí - m bickerer, grumbler
cnáfairt (de dhuine) - f bony, emaciated person
cnagadán - m hardy, little man
cnáimhseálaí -m grumbler
cnaíteachán - m weakling
cnámharlach - m extremely thin, lanky person
cnápach - m wretch
cnapaire - m big strong person, hoarder
cnapán amadáin - m big fool
cnapán duine uasail - m bigwig
cnat - m mean, niggardly person
cneámhaire - m mean person, rogue, crook
cníopaire - m mean miserely person
cnuachaire - m tall emaciated person
cnuálaí - m lagger, slacker
cnúidín - m wizened person

CO

coc - m cocky person
cocaire - m cocky, cheeky person
codaí - m indolent, easy-going, person; idler
codlatán - m sleeper, sleepy-head
cogarnach - m whisperer; conspirator
cograch - m confidant; sweetheart
coigealach - m tall unkempt person
coigéile - m mate, companion
coigleoir - m hoarder; frugal person
coigríochach - stranger, foreigner
coiliamach - m big, lazy person
coilíneach - m outsider, black sheep
coillearán - huge person
coinnleoir - m anle- bearer,tall thin person
coirbeach - f hunched, stooped person
coirm gan cuireadh - f uninvited, unwelcome guest
coirneach - m tonsured person; monk, friar
collach - m crude, fleshy person
comhairíoch - m funeral-goer
comhalta - m foster-brother, foster-sister
Conán - m Big easy going person; disgruntled person
conmhaor - m kennelman
conspóidí - m argumentative person
construálaí - m argumentative person, bickerer
contrálaí - m contrary person
contrálaí linbh - m perverse child
cornaire - m hornblower
corránach - m youth, boyo
corránaí - m reaper
corrchoigilt - f impish, michievous person
corrdhiabhal - m eccentric, queer person
corrdhuine - m odd, occasional, queer person
corróg (f) de bhean mhór - a big broad built woman
corrthónaí - m fidgety person
corúisc - f big, witless woman
cosnaíoch - m long-legged person

Hope I got the balance right here and didn't leave out too many.

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leagaire (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 75.82.133.105
Posted on Sunday, February 18, 2007 - 03:13 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

La 2nd 10

lag - m. weak creature
lagar - m. weak person
laghchán - m. 1. smiling, wheedling child, 2. foolishly amiable person
lagrachán - m. weakling
laige - f. tender youth
laighchín - m. 1. smiling, wheedling child, 2. foolishly amiable person
láimhíneach - m. 1. nimble-handed person, 2. one-armed person, 3. angler
láimhseálaí - m. meddler
láimhsitheroir - m. 1. manipulator, 2. grappler
láinnéar - m. person in tatters

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Scathach
Member
Username: Scathach

Post Number: 23
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Sunday, February 18, 2007 - 03:59 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

CR

crabadán - m crabbed person; stunted person
crabadán linbh - m puny, cantankerous child
cabhaitéal - m puny, miserable creature
crácálaí - m toiler, struggler
crágaí - m person with large hands
crágálaí - m clawer, pawer. Awkward walker
craiceachán - m large-buttocked person
craiceálaí - m cracked, crazy person
cráifeachán - m pious person
craimpín - m rhheumatic person
cráintín - f ageing, withered female
cráisiléad - m bulky, corpulent person
cráiteachán - m Sad tormented person; miserable creature
cráiteachán linbh - vexatious child
cráiteachán de sheanduine - fretful old man
cráiteog - f tormented, miserable woman
cráiteoir - m tormentor; miserable, vexatious woman; miser
crampaeir - m drunk person
crampánach - m one afflicted with cramps, pains
cránaí (m) fir - huge man
cránaí (m) mná - huge woman
crandán - m stunted, underdeveloped person; withered old person
crandúir - m withered old man
crannlaoch - m seasoned warrior, old soldier
craosaire - m glutton
craplachán - m cripple
créachtaí - m weak, consumptive person
creatachán - m weak, emaciated person
creathaire - m trembler, frightened person
creathánaí - m trembler
críochadóir - m marker of boundaries
críonán - m old wizened person
críontachán - m old wizened person
crístín - m god-parent
crobhaire - m strong able person
croídín - m little darling
croithleán - m shivering, cold-looking person; weakling
crompánaí láidir - sturdy thickset person
crosachán - m pock-marked, dirty-faced person
crosdiabhal - m devil's imp, mischievous person
crostóir - m fractious person; mischievous child
cruachán - m person of stunted dark
cruálaí - m cruel person; stingy person
crúbachán - m person with big awkward hands or feet
crúbálaí - m clawer, pawer; person with big awkward hands or feet
cruimheachán - m venomous person
cruipidín - m crippled person
cruiteachán - m hunchback
cruitíneach - m hunchback
crunca - m doubled-up, decrepit person
crupach - m shrunken, stiff-jointed person

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Dennis
Member
Username: Dennis

Post Number: 2651
Registered: 02-2005


Posted on Sunday, February 18, 2007 - 04:15 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Cúpla rud:

lag - m. weak creature

FGB has "weak person", which is better for our list.

laghchán - m. 1. smiling, wheedling child, 2. foolishly amiable person

This is a variant of "láchán", and listing it is a good idea. But going back to "láchán" I happened to notice that you miscopied "foolishly amiable" as "foolish, amiable". Not a biggie at all, but I have fixed it.

laige - f. tender youth

This is an abstract noun (youth = youngness) and should be omitted.

Ar aghaidh leat!

"An seanchas gearr,
an seanchas is fearr."




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