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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 2005- » 2005 (May-June) » Archive through May 08, 2005 » Raidió na Gaeltachta « Previous Next »

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Harrison
Member
Username: Harrison

Post Number: 1
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Monday, April 18, 2005 - 04:30 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Hello,

I'm new to the forums and figured I should introduce myself. Is mé Harrison. I use the book "Learning Irish" by Ó Siadhail and am still a beginner. On www.rte.ie/rnag/eist , which show features Irish from Conamara? I think it would be very beneficial to hear the Irish I'm learning used by others. Níl mórán "Irish speakers" anseo i gCalifornia. Also, for the old TYI book, are there tapes or some audio to accompany it? I've read Jonas' praises for this book, and his love for the dialect ;) Is there a show on RnaG where there are speakers of this Munster dialect? Also, is there a website that sells the old TYI book and/or the possible audio accompaniment? Go raibh maith agaibh.

Slán,

Harrison

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Cailindoll
Member
Username: Cailindoll

Post Number: 55
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, April 19, 2005 - 06:36 am:   Edit Post Print Post

The audio tape to TYI has a really annoyingly British voice to it. Is it just me or does that really bother anyone else? I love the sound of a British accent as much as any accent, and the voice is lovely and clear, but it just seems so strange to not have the English done in an Irish accent, especially since the sounds you're working to imitate in Irish are closer to the Irish sounds of English. There's a new set out as well called Irish for Beginners by usborne that has a similar voice on its tape. At one point the British voice repeats DO in the explanation for the preposition, for example with his accent and it's almost in two syllables. It made me laugh out loud. Why the speakers doing the Irish pieces weren't also used for the explanations, I don't know.

Anyway, sorry for that rant, Harrison and I'd be happy to give my tape away to you, but I’m pretty sure I pitched it. I got NYT after I had the sounds in my head, and I love it for the rules. I sat down and read it cover to cover almost in one sitting in a desperate attempt to learn to write in Irish quickly. You can't do that with most grammar books, no matter how desperate you are! So I do like the book, but was never very patient with the tape. Good luck!

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Harrison
Member
Username: Harrison

Post Number: 2
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Tuesday, April 19, 2005 - 03:16 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

What's NYT? Glad to hear you liked the book, but the British accent on the tapes would definitely sound out of place.

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Dáithí
Member
Username: Dáithí

Post Number: 63
Registered: 01-2005


Posted on Tuesday, April 19, 2005 - 03:33 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I just bought the latest edition of TYI with CD's. I don't know what accent the narrator has, but it's different than the non-original, cassette-based TYI that I also have. What I like about the newest CD based version is that the speakers talk slowly enough for beginners like me to understand. I find most audio material much too fast for me to comprehend, so it's nice to have something that I can understand for a change :)

(I think NYT stands for "Now Your Talking" but Cailindoll can confirm)

Dáithí

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James
Member
Username: James

Post Number: 176
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Tuesday, April 19, 2005 - 05:19 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I concur with Cailindoll regarding the british accent on the TYI tapes. First my mind had to get around the british pronunciation of "my standard" version, then I had to rapidly "re-gear" my brain to hear the Irish pronunciation. I know that this sound a bit Americo-centric but it was a problem for me none-the-less. Cailindoll's suggestion of an Irish person (with the Hiberno-english accent) makes soooo much more sense to me. I would imagine that some of the phonetic treatment would remain more consistent english to Irish.

Le meas

James

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Cailindoll
Member
Username: Cailindoll

Post Number: 56
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, April 19, 2005 - 05:20 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Yeah, sorry, Now You're Talking/Irish On Your Own, but I meant TYI, just got the letters mixed up.

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Tomh
Member
Username: Tomh

Post Number: 3
Registered: 02-2005
Posted on Tuesday, April 19, 2005 - 07:45 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I think Harrison wants tapes for the older Myles Dillon TYI. Try searching "Dillon" on this site. It seems that tapes do exist, but I don't know if they were produced commercially or if someone just made them.

The Dillon TYI is very useful no matter what dialect you actually speak.

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Harrison
Member
Username: Harrison

Post Number: 4
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Thursday, April 21, 2005 - 02:21 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Can someone tell me what radio program to listen to at www.rte.ie/rnag/eist that has speakers from Conamara?

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Paul
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 66.152.218.225
Posted on Thursday, April 21, 2005 - 09:16 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Harrison,

Togha agus Rogha [Dé Domhnaigh] is one.

Le meas, Paul

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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 1297
Registered: 08-2004


Posted on Thursday, April 21, 2005 - 09:27 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Look in the programme for programmes broadcast from Casla - these are usually Conamara speakers.

09:15 Cursai an Lae Clar irise a chur i lathair o Chasla ag Neasa Ni Chualain. 10.00am Priomhscealta na Nuachta. (Magazine programme from Costello).

14:04 Ardtrathnona A chur i lathair o Chasla ag Mairtin Tom Sheainin Mac Donncha. (Conversation, song and music from Connemara).

Also programmes with Seosamh Ó Cuaig tend to feature mostly Conamara speakers.

But nowadays you will likely hear speakers from any gaeltacht and outside on almost any programme!



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