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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 2005- » 2005 (March-April) » Archive through April 03, 2005 » September 1913 « Previous Next »

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Cailin
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 194.165.169.90
Posted on Saturday, March 19, 2005 - 11:37 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Hi! Ta a fhios agam nach bhfuil an t-abhar seo relevant to irish, but I'll ask anyway!!

Would you consider the September 1913 Lockout a social movement?

Go raibh maith agat!

Cailín

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Seán a' Chaipín
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 217.45.211.12
Posted on Saturday, March 19, 2005 - 12:14 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Well, all things in Ireland tend to be local. It was a social movement in Dublin, in that it involved a group or class of people trying something new.

I don't think it had all that much effect on the rest of the country though.

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Antaine
Member
Username: Antaine

Post Number: 277
Registered: 10-2004


Posted on Saturday, March 19, 2005 - 04:39 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

'cept through Yeats

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An_mídheach_mealltach
Member
Username: An_mídheach_mealltach

Post Number: 28
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Sunday, March 20, 2005 - 07:04 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

The lock out wasn't a social movement. The Union that organised it was.

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'dj@ks
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 159.134.220.67
Posted on Sunday, March 20, 2005 - 08:08 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

scríbhneoirí ó Shéamus Ó Conghaile
writings of James Connelly

Ar na 'lock-out'/about the lockout:
http://www.marxists.org/archive/connolly/1913/08/lckoutev.htm

agus/ and
http://www.marxists.org/archive/connolly/1915/05/lckoutsq.htm

agus aon alt amháin /and one more article, (an géillsineach/ subject: gaeilge)
http://www.marxists.org/archive/connolly/1898/10/language.htm

níl a fhios agam a lán faoin sóisialachas, dá bhrí sin, ní bheidh mé cur isteach aon tráchtaireacht :)

I know little on socialism, so no commentary will be forthcoming, altho that has never stopped me before...

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Antaine
Member
Username: Antaine

Post Number: 278
Registered: 10-2004


Posted on Sunday, March 20, 2005 - 08:43 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

here's Yeats on the subject

http://www.poetryconnection.net/poets/William_Butler_Yeats/1482

now, he was a non-working-class protestant. it served as a rallying point for many at the time, regardless of immediate circumstances...

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Cailin
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Posted From: 193.203.149.249
Posted on Monday, March 21, 2005 - 06:28 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Thanx! Is anyone here a fan of Yeats? Ceapaim go bhfuil sé go hiontach. Is breá liom na dánta 'September 1913' agus 'Easter 1916'. They're great!
'What need you being come to sense but fumble in a greasy till and add the halfpence to the pence. . .'

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Dáithí
Member
Username: Dáithí

Post Number: 51
Registered: 01-2005


Posted on Monday, March 21, 2005 - 09:04 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I'd say I'm a fan of Yeats. I went to summer school in Sligo back in the eighties and had a great time. I think Yeats' poetry is the finest - so full of imagery and beauty.

Since today seems to be Quiz Day, can anyone guess where I took the photo for my profile? Hint: think Yeats.

Le meas,

Dáithí

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'dj@ks
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Posted From: 159.134.220.182
Posted on Monday, March 21, 2005 - 10:30 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

The graveyard where he is buried?

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Seán a' Chaipín
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 83.104.38.8
Posted on Tuesday, March 22, 2005 - 04:49 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Nope. Túr Ballylee, I would reackon. Some info on it at the bottom of this page:

http://www.fernhillfarm.net/local-area.html

Is maith liom féin "sailing to Byzantium":

Once out of nature I shall never take
My bodily form from any natural thing,
But such a form as Grecian goldsmiths make
Of hammered gold and gold enamelling
To keep a drowsy Emperor awake;
Or set upon a golden bough to sing
To lords and ladies of Byzantium
Of what is past, or passing, or to come.

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Antaine
Member
Username: Antaine

Post Number: 282
Registered: 10-2004


Posted on Tuesday, March 22, 2005 - 07:41 am:   Edit Post Print Post

i've always like that one and Adam's Curse, No Second Troy, Ego Dominus Tuus, Leda and the Swan, the Crazy Jane poems, Lapis Lazuli, and The Second Coming...

...Oddly, I have never been able to warm up to The Lake Isle of Inisfree...

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Dáithí
Member
Username: Dáithí

Post Number: 52
Registered: 01-2005


Posted on Tuesday, March 22, 2005 - 08:58 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Tá Seán a' Chaipín ceart. Thanks for the link to fernhillfarm, which has the poem Yeats wrote about the tower and appears on the front of the tower:

quote:

I, the poet William Yeats,
With old mill boards and sea-green slates,
And smithy work from the Gort forge,
Restored this tower for my wife George;
And may these characters remain
When all is ruin once again.


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Paul_h
Member
Username: Paul_h

Post Number: 17
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, March 22, 2005 - 02:52 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

to come back to the lockout. It was neither a social movement, nor did a union organise it. The lockout was the reaction of certain Dublin employers (notably one William Martin Murphy if my memory serves me correctly) to strike action organised by a union. The strike was the social action. Unfortunately it was a total failure and a sad episode in Dublin's history and in the history of Irish trade unionism.



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