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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 2005- » 2005 (January-February) » Archive through February 18, 2005 » Resources for teaching JC leaving Irish - PLEASE HELP « Previous Next »

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Janet O'Brien
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Posted From: 213.202.139.18
Posted on Tuesday, February 15, 2005 - 05:31 am:   Edit Post Print Post

I have recently been landed with the task of helping a cousin of mine with her Junior Cert. Irish. Her levels are pretty low and she intends to sit the pass paper. Her weekest point is oral irish. I've been looking online for some resources as to what the junior cert. oral is like, but I can't find anything. I was hoping someone on this site could help. I know some of you are teachers and others are not many years from the junior cert themselves (although perhaps not with pass irish) Websites, books, Anything! Please Help.

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 936
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Tuesday, February 15, 2005 - 05:46 am:   Edit Post Print Post


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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 938
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Tuesday, February 15, 2005 - 07:35 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Are you sure there is an ORAL (conversation) as opposed to an AURAL (listening test) for the junior cert?

I think there is only an aural.

(Message edited by aonghus on February 15, 2005)

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Janet
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Posted From: 213.202.139.18
Posted on Tuesday, February 15, 2005 - 09:45 am:   Edit Post Print Post

No Aonghus, I'm not sure. Tempted to say that someone who's failing pass Irish is probably unaware of the distinction between aural and oral. Possibly she meant aural. Thanks for the link. I wonder if I can get a CD of past exams somewhere.

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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 942
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Tuesday, February 15, 2005 - 10:57 am:   Edit Post Print Post

http://www.edco.ie/exampapers/exampapers3.asp?product_id=924

They also have some mp3 files, but I haven't a clue what they are (no sound on this PC)

http://www.edco.ie/cd/default.asp


also this

http://www.e-xamit.ie/

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Janet
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Posted From: 213.202.129.55
Posted on Wednesday, February 16, 2005 - 07:37 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Thanks again A,

Those sound files comprise the listening tasks which go with a textbook. I could probably give 'em a listen and think up some approriprate tasks (I'm a TEFL teacher, so I guess teaching irish as a native language is much the same as teaching english as a foreign one. TISL would probly be the most approriprate abbreviation.) I was in town yesterday, so I bought past papers, and they came with a cd of five years of aural exams, so I've got a great base to start off now. Thanks for your research, those sites will be very valuable to me.

Funny, I listened to the first of those mp3 files, and it started - eistigi go dti na treoricha agus na ciesteanna a gabhann le chuid A. Total flashback.

J.

P.S. You see my english and irish spelling are equally dire.

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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 951
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Wednesday, February 16, 2005 - 07:47 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Fáilte romhat.

Agus ádh mór leis an obair!

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'dj@ks
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Posted From: 159.134.220.103
Posted on Wednesday, February 16, 2005 - 06:23 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

It was not so long ago, I seen an Irish course advertised with 45s! (Thats 45 RPM records, yes vinylz). Its téipanna ahoy since a long time...then Turas Teanga did on CDs, then DVD...and mp3s bring up the rear. Useful on Zen or iPOD about town. Now we need GPS, G3, and pod combined to tell us the Irish name of whereever we go, the names of things ('síopa') and what we are doing...are there rude words in Irish?

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'dj@ks
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Posted From: 159.134.220.103
Posted on Wednesday, February 16, 2005 - 06:25 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

"..I seen an Irish course..."

I saw!

So uneducated

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Janet
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 213.202.170.250
Posted on Thursday, February 17, 2005 - 09:23 am:   Edit Post Print Post

No, dj, there are no dirty words in Irish - it is a pure language, full of high minded ideals, with no word for yes, no word for no and a special verb for 'it would be worth your while'.

After that, we do not require dirty words.

;-)

J.



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