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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 2005- » 2005 (January-February) » Archive through February 18, 2005 » Reading Irish « Previous Next »

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Paul
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 198.81.26.47
Posted on Saturday, February 12, 2005 - 02:36 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Hi,

Can someone tell me where to find a good guide (online or a book) to reading Irish? I started that Pimsleur course, but it's just audio without any written material, and my dictionaries have no guide on reading Irish.

Thanks!

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Jonas
Member
Username: Jonas

Post Number: 644
Registered: 08-2004


Posted on Saturday, February 12, 2005 - 04:43 am:   Edit Post Print Post


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'dj@ks
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 159.134.221.192
Posted on Saturday, February 12, 2005 - 09:57 am:   Edit Post Print Post

A Jhonas,
is that the real 'auld-time' one that we hear so much of, or the newer 'Learning Irish Lite' you've warned so much of?

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Jonas
Member
Username: Jonas

Post Number: 646
Registered: 08-2004


Posted on Saturday, February 12, 2005 - 12:31 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

djäks, I think you're confusing it with Teach Yourself Irish. There is only one version of Learning Irish, while there was an old, very good version of Teach Yourself Irish and a new version that could indeed by described as "lite".

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Peadar_Ó_gríofa
Member
Username: Peadar_Ó_gríofa

Post Number: 144
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Wednesday, February 16, 2005 - 03:21 am:   Edit Post Print Post

there was an old, very good version of Teach Yourself Irish and a new version that could indeed be described as "lite".

I agree fully. I listened to the new one once and promptly gave it away, and that was no great act of charity. Once I heard "An, vuil, an, Ghaeilge, DEOCHAIR, dar leat? An, vuil, an, Ghaeilge, DEOCHAIR, dar leat?", I'd heard enough. Not [d´okir´], but [d´oxir´], loud and clear, and loud and clear again. Obviously some publishers don't know any better than to think that anyone who is a native of Ireland qualifies as a "native speaker" of Irish. Conversaphone, Berlitz, and now Teach Yourself.

Peadar Ó Gríofa

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Lughaidh
Member
Username: Lughaidh

Post Number: 107
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Wednesday, February 16, 2005 - 07:37 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

>Obviously some publishers don't know any better than to think that anyone who is a native of Ireland qualifies as a "native speaker" of Irish.

Many Irish people claim to be native speakers as well, some of them because they had irish classes since early childhood. Well well...

The CD-Rom "Learn Irish" by Eurotalk has been recorded by non-native speakers as well, they have a horrible English-speakers’ accent.



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