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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 2005- » 2005 (January-February) » Archive through February 18, 2005 » Million Dollar Baby « Previous Next »

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Fiosrach
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 149.157.1.40
Posted on Sunday, February 06, 2005 - 04:40 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

So can somebody who has actually seen the film and not just read a newspaper review tell me how much Irish is actually used in the film.

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Daithí
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 205.188.116.135
Posted on Monday, February 07, 2005 - 12:35 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Very little. But it is there throughout the film, from he beginning to the end.

There are no real conversations, but Clint Eastwood often reads aloud as Gaeilge.



*** WARNING: The story is very sad.

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Fear_na_mbróg
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Username: Fear_na_mbróg

Post Number: 406
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Monday, February 07, 2005 - 05:05 am:   Edit Post Print Post

He calls it "Gaelic"...

I'm curious, what's the hell is up with people calling the language by different names??? My understanding was that the language's name is:

A) In the Irish language: "Gaeilge"
B) In the English language: "The Irish Language"

I thought "Gaelic" was English for the Scottish language... ?

What are the other names people call it by? Where do they call it that? And why?

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 894
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Monday, February 07, 2005 - 05:44 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Irish is often called "Gaelic" in America.

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Jonas
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Username: Jonas

Post Number: 609
Registered: 08-2004


Posted on Monday, February 07, 2005 - 05:49 am:   Edit Post Print Post

What are the other names people call it by? Where do they call it that? And why?

In Swedish there are no less than four names! Iriska, irländska, gaeliska and gäliska are all fairly common. In the translation of Synge's "The Aran Islands", 'gäliska' is the word used throughout the book and that book is read by many Swedes visiting Ireland. I never use any other name than 'iriska' when speaking Swedish, nor do any other Swedish & Irish speaker I know.

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Colleen
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Posted From: 194.165.168.237
Posted on Monday, February 07, 2005 - 04:47 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Cool! Why does Clint Eastwood use Irish in the film though?

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Éamonn na Móna
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Posted From: 83.104.38.8
Posted on Tuesday, February 08, 2005 - 04:45 am:   Edit Post Print Post

The movie is based on a novel by an Irish American author - the fact that Clint's character Frank studies Gaelic and enjoys Yeats shows he has an intellectual, contemplative side - he's not just a brutish boxer.

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Canuck
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Username: Canuck

Post Number: 4
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Tuesday, February 08, 2005 - 10:20 am:   Edit Post Print Post

My non-pedant observation here in Canada is that in Newfoundland, you'll hear the language called "Erse". Although, in the rest of Canada a distinction is made between Gaelic (the language spoken in communities on Cape Breton Island) and Irish Gaelic (the language of Ireland and once predominant language in Halifax).

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Ó_diocháin
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Username: Ó_diocháin

Post Number: 90
Registered: 09-2004
Posted on Tuesday, February 08, 2005 - 01:21 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A chairde.
Mar eolas daoibh "Erse" is a Scots word for Irish.
Found in both Lallans and Doric, the term is often used for Gaeilge and Gàidhlig.
Slán beo!
Chris

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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 910
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Tuesday, February 08, 2005 - 03:56 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

And used to be used in the 16th Century in England.

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Daithí_mac_lochlainn
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Username: Daithí_mac_lochlainn

Post Number: 7
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Tuesday, February 08, 2005 - 05:32 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Samuel Johnson referred to Scots Gaelic as "Erse".

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Daithí_mac_lochlainn
Member
Username: Daithí_mac_lochlainn

Post Number: 8
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Tuesday, February 08, 2005 - 05:32 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Samuel Johnson referred to Scots Gaelic as "Erse".

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Peadar_Ó_gríofa
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Username: Peadar_Ó_gríofa

Post Number: 111
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Tuesday, February 08, 2005 - 06:15 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

So did one Thomas Wilkinson:

"Passed a Female who was reaping alone: she sung in Erse as she bended over her sickle; the sweetest human voice I ever heard: her strains were tenderly melancholy, and felt delicious, long after they were heard no more"
http://eir.library.utoronto.ca/rpo/display/poem2370.html

See also:
http://www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/~oduibhin/mcq/ulsterirish.htm

Peadar Ó Gríofa

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'djaeks
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Posted From: 159.134.220.86
Posted on Tuesday, February 08, 2005 - 07:57 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Must have been a mighty Erse to inspire such poetry!

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Lúcas
Member
Username: Lúcas

Post Number: 111
Registered: 01-2004


Posted on Tuesday, February 08, 2005 - 11:20 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Brendan Behan referred to those who earned a fáine óir as Erse holes.

Mise le meas,

Lúcas

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Seán a' Chaipín
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Posted From: 81.139.52.16
Posted on Wednesday, February 09, 2005 - 10:00 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Does anyone know what Clint was actually reading out?

Don't make me have to go and see it!

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'dj@ks
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 159.134.220.66
Posted on Thursday, February 10, 2005 - 10:47 am:   Edit Post Print Post

What he is saying is pretty much indecipherable as he is pronouncing little snippets. It really is a support to the character rather then a main stream to the storyline.

Most of it is token, and the montage type sector where we see the girl winning fights and Irish people shouting 'mo cushla' or similar as she tours Europe winning fight after fight is daft. Irish people would not shout out such a cod-Irish slogan. In fact she never learns what it means till the end. I'd imagine someone might tell her at some stage, like "Why do you have 'my heartbeat' (or whatever nuance) written on your back?"

The story is powerful to say the least. The Gaelic bits are not worth going to see alone.

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Lúcas
Member
Username: Lúcas

Post Number: 112
Registered: 01-2004


Posted on Thursday, February 10, 2005 - 11:18 am:   Edit Post Print Post

It is heard to tell from his pronunciation, but seems he is reciting the personal pronouns for ag,namely, agam, agat, ...

Mise le meas,

Lúcas

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Peadar_Ó_gríofa
Member
Username: Peadar_Ó_gríofa

Post Number: 117
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Thursday, February 10, 2005 - 08:23 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Sounds like that TV miniseries about 20±¹º years ago, in which they were supposed to say "na Géanna Fiáine":

"Nah, ganna, feena. Remember: Nah, ganna, feena!"

Peadar Ó Gríofa

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Pádraig
Member
Username: Pádraig

Post Number: 107
Registered: 09-2004
Posted on Sunday, February 13, 2005 - 02:54 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Irish is often called "Gaelic" in America

Yes, and I suspect that it stems from the early part of 20th century prior to the 1918 Armistice or earlier to the emergence of the Gaelic League. Prior to the formation of the Republic, considerable support for Irish Ireland was successfully sought among the emigrants in America, and the Nationalist spirit was manifest in the word, Gaelic. We Yanks have a funny way of making linguistic associations sometimes. Consider the Boston Celtics, an adjective used as a noun and pronounced Seltics. Their emblem is a shamrock. Seems a far reach from the Kennedys of Boston to the Irish inhabitants of the preViking Ireland.

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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 928
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Monday, February 14, 2005 - 04:25 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Glasgow Celtic soccer club in Scotland is also usually pronounced "Seltic" - It's a feature of English!

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Jonas
Member
Username: Jonas

Post Number: 647
Registered: 08-2004


Posted on Monday, February 14, 2005 - 07:37 am:   Edit Post Print Post

The film must be better than I thought; Rush Limbaugh hates it. :-)

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/02/13/arts/13rich.html?



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