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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 2005- » 2005 (January-February) » Archive through February 09, 2005 » Need help translating a phrase into Irish « Previous Next »

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Melanie Magatelli
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 208.244.205.250
Posted on Wednesday, February 02, 2005 - 06:06 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I am hoping to find someone to translate a phrase from English to Irish, to be engraved in our wedding rings. We don't want a literal translation, as again, this is for our wedding rings. Any help even pointing me in the right direction is much appreciated....we have almost exhuasted our resources and time is closing in on us!
Thank you!!

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Lughaidh
Member
Username: Lughaidh

Post Number: 44
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Wednesday, February 02, 2005 - 06:26 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Just ask us :)

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Antaine
Member
Username: Antaine

Post Number: 187
Registered: 10-2004


Posted on Wednesday, February 02, 2005 - 06:52 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

uh...what's the phrase?

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Fear_na_mbróg
Member
Username: Fear_na_mbróg

Post Number: 390
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Thursday, February 03, 2005 - 05:33 am:   Edit Post Print Post

There's plenty of proficient Irish language speaking people here, so just fire away!

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Melanie
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 208.244.205.250
Posted on Thursday, February 03, 2005 - 10:23 am:   Edit Post Print Post

I apologize for not writing the phrase. We have received less than favorable responses on other discussion boards. Here goes:

Pledge to thee heart & soul

Thanks again for your help!

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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 865
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Thursday, February 03, 2005 - 10:46 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Geallaim duit croí agus anam

or

tiomnaím duit mo chroí agus m'anam

Wait for the lint pickers before engraving!

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Antaine
Member
Username: Antaine

Post Number: 190
Registered: 10-2004


Posted on Thursday, February 03, 2005 - 01:32 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Is this perhaps a more accurate capture of what the sentiment in English would be?
"(I am) pledged to thee, heart and soul"

if so, my attempt would be:
"(táim) geallta duitsa, croí 's anam"

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Antaine
Member
Username: Antaine

Post Number: 191
Registered: 10-2004


Posted on Thursday, February 03, 2005 - 01:34 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

or mo chrói 's m'anam ("my heart and my soul" vs "heart and soul")

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Melanie
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 208.244.205.250
Posted on Thursday, February 03, 2005 - 01:41 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

We are trying to express that with our rings we are pledging to each other our hearts & souls. It is also part of our vows.

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Antaine
Member
Username: Antaine

Post Number: 194
Registered: 10-2004


Posted on Thursday, February 03, 2005 - 02:07 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

hm, how about
mo chroí 's m'anam, geallta duitsa
(my heart and my soul, pledged to thee)

somebody double check me on the emphatic form of "to you" i found it in use in some places, but not recognized in some dictionaries...

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Fear_na_mbróg
Member
Username: Fear_na_mbróg

Post Number: 395
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Thursday, February 03, 2005 - 03:29 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Pledge to thee heart & soul

Obviously that's an abbreviation of a sentence, as it wouldn't make sense if it were an order. So first tell us what you're abbreviating and we'll give it a try:

a) I pledge to thee my heart and soul
b) I am pledged to thee, with heart and soul
c) With this I pledge to thee my heart and soul

quote:

We are trying to express that with our rings we are pledging to each other our hearts & souls. It is also part of our vows.



Well,

"With this ring I pledge to thee my heart and soul"

would be:

"Leis an bhfáinne seo, cuirim i ngeall duit mo chroí agus m'anam"

which ofcourse is a bit long-winded...

I'm not sure if:

Geallaim duit

is a good replacement for:

Cuirim i ngeall duit

The latter seems more natural to me...

Anyway,

"I pledge to thee my heart and soul"

Cuirim i ngeall duit mo chroí agus m'anam

I'm sure you could abbreviate that further by sticking a dotted "c" in place of the "ch" in croí, and turning the "agus" into the Old-Irish ampersand symbol...

Or maybe just:

mo chroí & m'anam agatsa

"You have my heart and soul".

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Melanie
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 208.244.205.250
Posted on Thursday, February 03, 2005 - 04:50 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

It is an abbreviation of "I pledge to thee my heart and soul." My ring is quite small so the last one:

"you have my heart and soul"

works well and I had thought that if possible, using the ampersand would be another way to save space.

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Antaine
Member
Username: Antaine

Post Number: 196
Registered: 10-2004


Posted on Thursday, February 03, 2005 - 09:15 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

"agus" can be abbreviated as apostrophe s

's

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Melanie
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 208.244.205.250
Posted on Monday, February 07, 2005 - 11:01 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Thank you all for the help. We will take these options to our jeweler and see what fits!
Thanks again!



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