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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 2005- » 2005 (January-February) » Archive through January 14, 2005 » Harry Potter « Previous Next »

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Diarmo
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Username: Diarmo

Post Number: 79
Registered: 08-2004


Posted on Friday, December 17, 2004 - 05:25 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/northern_ireland/4100821.stm

Last Updated: Thursday, 16 December, 2004, 10:29 GMT

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Irish spells for Harry Potter

The Harry Potter books have sold millions worldwide
The magical world of Harry Potter has cast its spell on the Irish language.
The first book in the series, Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, has been translated into Irish by Maire Nic Mhaolain, originally from County Down.

The book's publishers, Bloomsbury, have produced 25,000 copies and are waiting to see how it sells before translating the rest of the series.

Ms Nic Mhaolain said that translating JK Rowling's intrinsically English expressions to Irish was difficult.


Encountered problems

The names of the characters and places invented by the original author were not changed in translation, Harry Potter Agus An Orchloch.

In addition words such as Quidditch and Muggles were left alone by the Irish author.

However, Ms Nic Mhaolain said she still encountered problems right from the start.

She said: "When I was doing the translation, the very first sentence took me ages because it said 'The Dursleys were perfectly normal, thank you very much'."

She said that the expression 'thank you very much' was not intended to mean what it normally would.

I think Hermione is a good role model. She would get up your nose at times, she is so bossy, but in the end she is a good friend

Maire Nic Mhaolain

"I worked and worked at that sentence and then I said 'I'm still at the first sentence, help'. I went on, because I could have been stuck for ages," she said.

"After a while I worked out a technique to get around that."

Ms Nic Mhaolain gave a reading to some young Harry fans at the Irish Writers Centre in Dublin on Wednesday.

Eleven-year-old Sean Behan said: "It's good to finally have an Irish book that someone can read."

Laura Duff, from the Gael Scoil, Maynooth , County Kildare, who was attending the event, said it was wonderful to have a contemporary and successful book to offer her pupils.

"I think it is a great idea," she said.

"It is something they all enjoy reading. They have all read it in English and a lot of them have the book in Irish and were following along when the author was reading."

Ms Nic Mhaolain, who is from Downpatrick and worked for many years as an editor with An Gum, spent about nine months working on the commission.

Good friend

Before she started, she had not read the original novel, although it was "in the house".

Now she has a favourite character, Hermione.

She said: "Harry, of course, is the central character but Hermione is a clever girl.

"I think she is a good role model. She would get up your nose at times, she is so bossy, but in the end she is a good friend."

A Greek version of the book was launched at the same time, bringing to more than 200 the number of languages into which the record-selling children's books have been translated.

Already, 35m Harry Potter books have been sold worldwide, making author JK Rowling the highest earning writer in the world today.



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Seosamh Mac Muirí (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 193.1.100.104
Posted on Friday, December 17, 2004 - 10:21 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Déanfaidh sé leas a Dhiarmaid. Gheobhaimid roinnt cainteoirí Gaeilge as lucht a léite amach anseo, tá súil agam.

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 637
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Friday, December 17, 2004 - 10:39 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Nó ar laghad ní bheidh ar cainteoirí Gaeilge óga casadh ar an mBéarla nuair ata leabhair níos faide uaithe. Tá cóip againn sa mbaile, agus cuma maith ar an aistriúchán.

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fealsamh (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 149.157.1.122
Posted on Saturday, December 18, 2004 - 11:54 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

An bhfuil a fhios ag éinne conas atá ag éiri leis an leagan gaeilge ó thaobh diolachán?

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Natalie
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Username: Natalie

Post Number: 103
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Saturday, December 18, 2004 - 12:59 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

A Aonghuis, cén Béarlá atá ar "uaithe"? (I'm on Christmas holidays now and I need practice in reading and writing so hopefully that was right...) And also, I know they just translated the first one and perhaps I'm jumping the gun, but does the same person have plans to continue on with the next 4 books?!

Natalie

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 641
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Saturday, December 18, 2004 - 02:05 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

I misspellt uathu "from them"

Whether the other books are translated will depend on whether the first one sells well. Bloomsbury, the main publishers of J K Rowlings books, are the publishers of the Irish translation.

It seems to be selling well, especially coming up to Christmas.

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Natalie
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Username: Natalie

Post Number: 104
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Sunday, December 19, 2004 - 10:21 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Ok, sorry!

J K Rowling is doing pretty good for herself if she's the "highest earning writer in the world today"! I read all her books in English and I can imagine how difficult it must be to translate into another language. I think they made a good decision in leaving words like "Muggles" alone!

Natalie

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Antaine
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Username: Antaine

Post Number: 125
Registered: 10-2004


Posted on Sunday, December 19, 2004 - 11:46 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

...well...they could at least follow irish grammar...Mugglaí for plural...or would it be Muiggle/Muigglí...lol

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 643
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Sunday, December 19, 2004 - 04:31 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Máire Ní Mhaolain wasn't let! Bloomsbury/Warner Brothers insisted that names and trade marked words not be changed.

So "Mugal" was as far as she could go.

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Antaine
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Username: Antaine

Post Number: 126
Registered: 10-2004


Posted on Sunday, December 19, 2004 - 04:36 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

okay...but adding S doesn't mean plural in irish...

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 646
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Sunday, December 19, 2004 - 04:41 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

As far as I know she hasn't.

an Mugal/na Mugal is what is there - I have the book in front of me!

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Fear_na_mbróg
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Username: Fear_na_mbróg

Post Number: 332
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Monday, December 20, 2004 - 04:29 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

I always here "na muslimí" for "the muslims".

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 651
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Monday, December 20, 2004 - 04:34 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

What you hear is "na muslamaigh" - It just sounds like muslimí!

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Fear_na_mbróg
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Username: Fear_na_mbróg

Post Number: 333
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Monday, December 20, 2004 - 04:39 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

A little slip up! My grammar ain't that bad!

So I presume it's:

an muslamach
na muslamaigh
ainm an mhuslamaigh
ainmnemacha na muslamach
a mhuslamaigh!
a mhuslamacha!

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 652
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Monday, December 20, 2004 - 06:15 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Is dócha é.
Ainmfhocal firinscneach den chéad díchlaonadh, de réir acmhainn/ an Coist Tearmaíochta

http://www.acmhainn.ie/tearmai/staira-m.htm
Moslem s (= Muslim) Moslamach m1
Moslem a (= Muslim) Moslamach a

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JuliaM (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 67.101.62.99
Posted on Tuesday, December 21, 2004 - 06:32 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

I have been working on the Harry Potter book since late October and I'm up to page eight. I tackle it when I can and during November and early December I didn't touch it for three weeks (life intervened). Anyway, my interest in Harry Potter as a work of literature is nil...I worked in bookstores during the Harry Potter mania and the hype turned me off. But, I am tackling it in the hope that someday, due to its popularity, someone will do an Irish audio book...stranger things have happened... and that I will be able to listen to it too. Anyway, I do it sentence by sentence, writing it out in Irish and then translating it into English and reading it aloud as I go.

90% of the time I can get the meaning just fine (I'm comparing it to the "american" version which I am hoping to replace with the "british" version some time in 2005)but every now and then I hit a snag and I need help with construction. My hope is that by the time I finish, sometime in 2020, some of it will have sunk in to the point that I can read it "at will".

As you can tell, I am not in a rush with this. I was wondering if there is anyone out there who is also working on the book ,at a similar pace, who would like to compare notes and questions, but not necessarily here on the board. Every time I hit a tough part I ache to ask for advice, but quail at the scrutiny it might provoke. My questions average at least one a page and I don't know if there are that many people out there slogging along like myself to sustain a topic. Right now, I just don't have the time to write posts in flawless Irish, hence my sticking to the English/Irish board. I need a really patient soul and am hoping someone will volunteer. I will appreciate any and all suggestions. Thanks very much.

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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 673
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Wednesday, December 22, 2004 - 04:10 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Julia,

I'll try to answer any posts here. I have the book, but I haven't got round to reading it yet. (I bought it for my sons!).

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Julia (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 67.101.60.130
Posted on Friday, December 24, 2004 - 08:00 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Aonghus, Go raith maith agat! Here is a sentence that I had trouble with: "Ina ionad sin dúirt sé os ard, chomh réidh agus ab eol dó, 'An mac sin acu - bheadh sé mórán ar aon aois le Dudley faoin taca seo, nach mbeadh?'" (background...the uncle is thinking of telling his wife about Harry ) "ina ionad sin"...I use Foclóir Gaelige-Béarla, and found "in ionad"= instead, so does "ina ionad sin" mean "instead of that"? "ina" is throwing me.

..chomh réidh agus ab eol dó... ab eol dó ???
as unhurried(ly?) as if he knew to him??? the english translation is "instead he said as casually as he could" which kind of matches but I'm a nut about making sense of the Irish.

And the rest of the sentence I got ..."that son of theirs, he would be much of an age with Dudley around this time, wouldn't he?"

As long as I've got your attention, let me try one more little one. "An ea a bhí rudaí á samhlú dó?"... "Is it that things were of his imagining to him?" I think in this case I need to know just what "á samhlú dó" is ... I know samhlú is a verbal noun of samhlaigh but does "á" and "dó" combine to mean "his"??

I hope this give you an idea of the kind of help I need. Please take your time, there is absolutely no urgency about this and I'm sorry I took so long in getting back to you. Believe it or not, this took me an hour to do between interruptions and those darn fadas.Nollaig Shona a Aonghus!

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An_mídheach_mealltach
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Username: An_mídheach_mealltach

Post Number: 5
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Friday, December 24, 2004 - 04:35 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Quote Aonghus:

"Julia,

I'll try to answer any posts here. I have the book, but I haven't got round to reading it yet. (I bought it for my sons!)."

yeah right ya did!

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Cailindoll
Member
Username: Cailindoll

Post Number: 1
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, December 27, 2004 - 05:03 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

"Máire Ní Mhaolain wasn't let! Bloomsbury/Warner Brothers insisted that names and trade marked words not be changed. "

Is trua sin, a Aonghus, go mór mór toisc sa leagan fraincise d'astreofar chuile rud -- ainm an scoil mar shampla go Poudelard, in áit Hogwarts, ainm Snape agus chuile rud eile. Agus i nGaeilge ní cheadtar dí fiú Bean Uí Dursley a scríobh in áit Mrs. Dursley? Sin do-chreidte. Is maith liom go bhfuil sé ar fáil i nGaeilge pé scéal é agus fairplé duit a Mháire Ní Mhaolain!



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