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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2004 (July-September) » Archive through August 22, 2004 » Trioblóid - Caibidil a hAon « Previous Next »

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Cormac
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Username: Cormac

Post Number: 9
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Thursday, August 12, 2004 - 05:27 am:   Edit Post Print Post

I've started reading Colmán Ó Drisceoil's short story for learners and need some translation help with the following:

Bhí an chuma ar an scéal go raibh Bronagh tar éis glacadh le scaradh a tuismitheoirí. Níor chuir sé isteach uirthí. Ach bhí imní ar Carla go raibh dochar á dhéanamh. Níor lig sí di féin machnamh an-domhain a dhéanamh air seo.

My interpretation, please correct/fill the gaps :)

It was the shape of the story that Bronagh accepted after the separation of her parents._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ . But Carla was worried that she would do harm. She did not let herself contemplate very deeply_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

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Cormac
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Username: Cormac

Post Number: 10
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Thursday, August 12, 2004 - 06:28 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Ach ní bheadh sé ann i bhfad eile.

Does that translate as:

But he wouldn't be any longer (much longer)

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 22
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Thursday, August 12, 2004 - 06:28 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Bhí an chuma ar an scéal = idiom for "it appeared"
Bronagh tar éis glacadh le = Brona was after accepting (bad english; it means Brona had accepted)
Níor chuir sé isteach uirthí = It (the separation) did not disturb her. (cur is a multifunction word!)

From an Foclóir Beag
cur isteach (caitheamh (cuir sé isteach a théarma); lorg (cur isteach ar phost); teacht salach ar (ná bí ag cur isteach orm)).

Ach bhí imní ar Carla go raibh dochar á dhéanamh Carla was worried that harm was being done (passive)

Níor lig sí di féin machnamh an-domhain a dhéanamh air seo. She didn't allow herself to dwell too deeply on this (the harm being done)

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Cormac
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Username: Cormac

Post Number: 11
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Thursday, August 12, 2004 - 07:12 am:   Edit Post Print Post

go raibh míle maith agat, a aonghus

expect more questions from me about this book ;)

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 24
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Thursday, August 12, 2004 - 11:43 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Fáilte romhat, a Chormaic.

(btw: the correct vocative of Aonghus is "a Aonghuis" (which sounds painful ;-) ) )

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Cormac
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Username: Cormac

Post Number: 13
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Thursday, August 12, 2004 - 11:50 am:   Edit Post Print Post

thx...i suspected as much...

so when is 'aonghusa' used?

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Jonas
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Username: Jonas

Post Number: 379
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Thursday, August 12, 2004 - 11:55 am:   Edit Post Print Post

"Aonghusa" is never used in Irish but all the more often in Croatian, Serbian, Russian, Ukrainian and so on. ;-)

(It's both the accusative and the genitive form of Aonghus, making it extremly common - given that Aonghus goes to any of those countries)

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Cormac
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Username: Cormac

Post Number: 14
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Thursday, August 12, 2004 - 04:35 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Another one I'm having trioblóid with:

Litir a tugadh isteach de láimh a bhí ann.

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Antóin (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 159.134.59.171
Posted on Thursday, August 12, 2004 - 07:04 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Without knowing the context I'd say it means:

"It was a letter that had been delivered by hand."

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Cormac
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Username: Cormac

Post Number: 16
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Friday, August 13, 2004 - 04:30 am:   Edit Post Print Post

that sounds right according to the context. so is this right then:

thugadh sé isteach = he had delivered
thugtaí isteach = one had delivered (had been delivered)
thug sé isteach = he delivered
tugann sé isteach = he delivers


a láimh = by hand

(Message edited by cormac on August 13, 2004)

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Cormac
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Username: Cormac

Post Number: 17
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Friday, August 13, 2004 - 04:43 am:   Edit Post Print Post

also...?

thug mé isteach - I delivered
tugadh isteach - 'one' delivered (past autonomous, as is the case in the sentence).

therefore the translation would be...?

Litir a tugadh isteach de láimh a bhí ann.
A letter that one delivered by hand.
A letter that was delivered by hand.

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 25
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Friday, August 13, 2004 - 06:24 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Thugadh sé isteach is habitual past, i.e something he did over time.

thug sé isteach

tugadh isteach is passive, no subject, so "A letter that was delivered by hand". is the correct translation.

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 30
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Friday, August 13, 2004 - 06:36 am:   Edit Post Print Post

By the way. Aonghusa is used in the genetive quite frequently

Leabhar Aonghusa
Mac Aonghusa
Dún Aonghusa

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Jonas
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Username: Jonas

Post Number: 383
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Friday, August 13, 2004 - 06:42 am:   Edit Post Print Post

So it is, how silly of me not to think about it. I've been to Dún Aonghusa umpteen times and talked about it in Irish at least as often. It has an archaic ring to it, though, don't you agree?

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 32
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Friday, August 13, 2004 - 10:12 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Aonghus is an archaic name....

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Jonas
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Username: Jonas

Post Number: 388
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Friday, August 13, 2004 - 12:08 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

he he, touché

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Cormac
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Username: Cormac

Post Number: 18
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Monday, August 16, 2004 - 08:00 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Where does the alternate spelling Aengus come from?

What would it be in the vocative, genitive?

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 36
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Monday, August 16, 2004 - 08:49 am:   Edit Post Print Post

The spellings Oengus, Aonghus, and Aengus have all been used. Oengus has passed out of use.

A Aenguis
Aengusa would be my guess at vocative & genetive.



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