mainoff.gif
lastdyoff.gif
lastwkoff.gif
treeoff.gif
searchoff.gif
helpoff.gif
contactoff.gif
creditsoff.gif
homeoff.gif


The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2004 (July-September) » Archive through August 06, 2004 » So I was talking..so bhi me ag caint.. « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

D (213.190.149.122 - 213.190.149.122)
Posted on Friday, August 06, 2004 - 04:36 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Irish speakers tend to use the English word so instead of a word as Ghaeilge...alors,entonces, entao would be the equivalent words in French,Spanish, and Portuguese...could you supply me with a real Irish word for so...

Ta na gaeilgeoiri ag usaid so go minic ach is focail ro-bearlach cheapaim- an bhfuil focail eile ann do so?? focail fior-Ghaeilge!

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Chris Dixon (194.247.95.130 - 194.247.95.130)
Posted on Friday, August 06, 2004 - 05:17 am:   Edit Post Print Post

A chara,
In the north, I think that "so" is less common in these circumstances and that people tend to say "bhuel".
I suspect that this is the same phenomenon though, just the English word "well", but at least it has a distinctive spelling as Gaeilge.
Slán beo!
Chris

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Rómán (213.197.173.4 - 213.197.173.4)
Posted on Friday, August 06, 2004 - 05:26 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Finally I can make some useful contribution to this site! :) Bhuel has Gaelainn spelling but it is still a borrowing from Béarla. Tá an focal deas as Gaelainn ann: MUISE. use it!

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Rómán (213.197.173.4 - 213.197.173.4)
Posted on Friday, August 06, 2004 - 05:28 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Finally I can make some useful contribution to this site! Bhuel has Gaelainn spelling but it is still a borrowing from Béarla. Tá an focal deas as Gaelainn ann: MHUISE. use it!

Sorry for typo!

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

D (213.190.149.122 - 213.190.149.122)
Posted on Friday, August 06, 2004 - 05:41 am:   Edit Post Print Post

How does one use it please Roman? go raibh maith agat

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Fear na mBróg (213.94.242.78 - 213.94.242.78)
Posted on Friday, August 06, 2004 - 07:18 am:   Edit Post Print Post

There's two different types of "so":

1) On account of something

2) As a result of

1) He didn't cut the grass, so he didn't get a dinner.
Níor bhearr sé an féar, mar sin ní bhfuair sé dinnéar.

2) He closed the window so that he wouldn't be cold
Dhún sé an fhuinneog chun nach mbeadh sé fuar.

Use of "so" in Gaeilge is disgusting in my own personal opinion. I see programs on TV that are supposedly in Gaeilge and then I hear the likes of:

Cad a bheidh ar siúl agat anocht?
Beidh mé ag babysiteáil.

Rachaidh mé ar mo bhicycle.

Glaoigh ar an ambulance!

The above disgust me, as does use of "so".

My own understanding for "muise" is that it means "whatever" or "never mind that".

Seán said he'd win today.
Never mind that!

Seán said he'd win today.
Whatever!

Dúirt Séan go mbuafadh sé inniu.
Muise!

Maybe I'm over simplifiying as regards "muise" though.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Cormac Ó Donnaile (195.67.112.150 - 195.67.112.150)
Posted on Friday, August 06, 2004 - 08:11 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Learning Irish gives muis(e) as "indeed!" or "now!"

eg:

Ní raibh, muis, ní raibh siad daor ar chor ar bith.

No, indeed, they weren't dear at all.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Fear na mBróg (213.94.242.78 - 213.94.242.78)
Posted on Friday, August 06, 2004 - 08:31 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Possibly you could say that:

No, indeed, they weren't dear at all.

could mean:

No, never mind that, they weren't dear at all.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Friday, August 06, 2004 - 09:04 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Muise is a euphemism for Muire (i.e. Mary, the mother of God to Christians). It is used for emphasis, as an ejaculation.

e.g. Tá, muis. = Yes, by heck.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Friday, August 06, 2004 - 09:10 am:   Edit Post Print Post

From an Foclóir Beag

muise [intriacht]
bhuel; leoga; an ea anois?.

bhuel [intriacht]
is ea (bhuel, conas a d'éirigh libh?).

leoga [intriacht]
go deimhin!, gan amhras!.

intriacht [ainmfhocal baininscneach den tríú díochlaonadh]
focal nó focail a scairtear le hiontas, nó le huafás (ar nós, ochón! mo bhron!).

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Tomás (198.22.236.230 - 198.22.236.230)
Posted on Friday, August 06, 2004 - 10:46 am:   Edit Post Print Post

We borrow words from other languages all the time, it's inevitable in today's world and tolerable up to a point. All languages evolve or at least change over time. It's all too clear that English has had an impact on the syntax and fluency of even native Irish speakers. This borrowing becomes not only annoying but destructive to the minority language when it deteriorates to "Gaelish" or breac-Ghaeilge out of laziness or ignorance, and we begin imposing English syntax on Irish and freely using English words were perfectly good Irish structures and words exist. I totally agree with Fear na mBróg on this on things like "babysiteáil" and "mo bhicycle" and the use of English structure and syntax. However, I get less annoyed about the throw away words "bhuel" and "so". I use them myself. At least the spelling fits the language.



©Daltaí na Gaeilge