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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2003 (October-December) » Translation please? « Previous Next »

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Jen (24.225.81.193 - 24.225.81.193)
Posted on Tuesday, December 09, 2003 - 12:00 am:   Edit Post Print Post

I am designing a room for a friend of mine, and I was hoping to paint a blessing in Irish on the walls. I was wondering if anyone knows a version of this in Irish, or if not would be willing to translate this for me? I would be ever appreciative, especially if you could email me. Thanks!!!

Deep peace of the running wave to you,
Deep peace of the flowing air to you,
Deep peace of the quiet earth to you,
Deep peace of the shining stars to you,
Deep peace of the gentle night to you,
Moon and stars pour their healing light on you,
Deep peace of the Light of the World to you.

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Larry (217.43.111.3 - 217.43.111.3)
Posted on Tuesday, December 09, 2003 - 09:22 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Jen, a chara,

There are a few ways of expressing "... to you" in Irish. If the message is aimed at one person you can use "duit" (for example) and "daoibh" if it's addressed to you (plural) so we'd really need to know how many people you're trying to convey the sentiments to.

Le meas,

Larry.

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Maidhc Ó G. (67.235.185.10 - 67.235.185.10)
Posted on Tuesday, December 09, 2003 - 09:28 am:   Edit Post Print Post

I'm sure we can come up with a much more lyrical interpretation as Gaeilge for you. Please be patient.
-Maidhc.

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Maidhc Ó G. (67.235.185.10 - 67.235.185.10)
Posted on Tuesday, December 09, 2003 - 09:32 am:   Edit Post Print Post

I've taken notice that things written are generally in the singular. Whether to make it more personable, or to make it more, "This means YOU!"
Le meas,
-Maidhc.

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Maidhc Ó G. (67.235.185.204 - 67.235.185.204)
Posted on Wednesday, December 10, 2003 - 02:46 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Ok, this is my first shot at this one. I've taken slight liberty to make in the pattern somewhat of a chant or prayer. Or at least I tried to. I didn't keep repeating, "Deep peace of the" for every line, but continued the use of gentive hoping that it'd help make it understood. I also added, "Deep peace with you" at the beginning and end to give it the flavor I was trying for. (Hope you don't mind.)

Dearg-suaimhneas thú.
Dearg-suaimhneas na tonna ag sruth thú
Aer ag sruth
Talaimh ciúnas
Dearg-suaimhneas réaltaí ag lonradh thú
oíche mharánta
agus de sholas saoil
Go gcuire siad an ghealach agus na réaltaí díobh solas a cneasú ort
Dearg-suaimhneas thú.

Ok guys. Lemme have it. How far off am I?
-Maidhc.

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Jen (24.225.81.193 - 24.225.81.193)
Posted on Wednesday, December 10, 2003 - 07:23 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Well it looks and sounds lovely. Thank you so much for taking the time to figure this out for me!

Jen

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Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Thursday, December 11, 2003 - 04:43 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Dearg = red or intense; doesn't seen right for peace

And to you would be "dhuit"

I avoided this, because the english seemed like something someone thought was an Old Irish prayer; and I didn't have time to re cast it.

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Larry (217.42.48.187 - 217.42.48.187)
Posted on Thursday, December 11, 2003 - 06:12 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Dearg also causes lenition (mar shampla dearg-ghráin ... intense hatred)...

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Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Thursday, December 11, 2003 - 06:29 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Deep peace of the running wave to you, domhain shuaimhneas na toinne tuile ort

Deep peace of the flowing air to you, domhain shuaimhneas sruth an aer ort

Deep peace of the quiet earth to you, domhain shuaimhneas na créafóige ciúine ort

Deep peace of the shining stars to you, domhain shuaimhneas na réaltaí lochrannacha ort

Deep peace of the gentle night to you domhain shuaimhneas na hoíche séimhe ort


Moon and stars pour their healing light on you, go ndoirte gealach is réaltaí a solas leigheasach ort


Deep peace of the Light of the World to you domhain shuaimhneas Solais na Cruinne ort

For plural, replace "ort" by "oraibh"

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Maidhc Ó G. (67.235.185.148 - 67.235.185.148)
Posted on Thursday, December 11, 2003 - 11:40 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Aw, I was afraid of some of that. I'd seen domhain, but the examples given showed depth off water and such - so I went with 'dearg-', which was defined as, red; utter, real. And cross referenced as deep rooted. That'll teach me! :)
And I thought I might get tripped up by my usage of 'thú', though I still don't see exactly where in this case. "Maith thú." vs. "Dearg-shuaimhneas thú."
And I just couldn't see the moon and stars 'pouring' anything. I got distracted somehow between 'caith' and 'cuir'.
There are other differences here, I think mostly between someone trying to make a translation and someone who actually knows what he's talking about. Oh well, it was worth a try.
-Maidhc.

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Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Friday, December 12, 2003 - 04:11 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Maith thú = you are good, used in the sense of "well done";
Maith ort = goodness on you
Go raibh tú maith = may you be good

I feel "Dearg" should only be used with negative words
dearg fhuath - red hatred

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Maidhc Ó G. (67.235.185.195 - 67.235.185.195)
Posted on Friday, December 12, 2003 - 08:16 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Ok. So, "Bhí sé go dearg-hiontach." It was utterly fantastic/horrible.
"Bhí sé gach go hiontach." It was completely fantastic/wonderful. (?)

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Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Friday, December 12, 2003 - 09:09 am:   Edit Post Print Post

I don't think so. Doesn't feel right

I'd say
Bhí sé go hiontach ar fad
or
Bhí sé go hiontach amach is amach

for "it was completely wonderful"

"Iontach" is a positive word; so I'd probably use uafásach for horrible.

I can't really explain this to you; because it is impossible to put gut feelings about words into a set of rules!

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Maidhc Ó G. (67.235.185.193 - 67.235.185.193)
Posted on Friday, December 12, 2003 - 11:22 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Actually, it does help a bit. I just thought I'd throw it out there to see what happened. And I also relooked up 'fíor-'. (Is that a real verb tense? haha.)
Mostly, it just means that more practice is needed.
Go raibh maith agat, a Aonghuis.
-Maidhc.

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Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Friday, December 12, 2003 - 11:25 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Fáilte romhat

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