mainoff.gif
lastdyoff.gif
lastwkoff.gif
treeoff.gif
searchoff.gif
helpoff.gif
contactoff.gif
creditsoff.gif
homeoff.gif


The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2003 (October-December) » Translation « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Cecelia Cooper (193.120.23.122 - 193.120.23.122)
Posted on Friday, November 21, 2003 - 08:28 am:   Edit Post Print Post

My brother wants me to get this translated for him into Irish so that he can get it tattoed on his back along with a Celtic Cross. It is commonly known as The Rune of St Patrick. Your help would be greatly appreciated:

THE CRY OF THE DEER

At TARA today in this fateful hour
I place all heaven with its power,
and the sun with its brightness,
and the snow with its whiteness,
and fire with all the strength it hath,
and lightning with its rapid wrath,
and the winds with their swiftness along their path,
and the sea with its deepness,
and the rocks with their steepness,
and the earth with its starkness:
all these I place,
by God's almighty help and grace,
between myself and the powers of darkness.

Thanks
Cecelia

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Friday, November 21, 2003 - 11:59 am:   Edit Post Print Post

I may have a transaltion of this among my books. I'll check.

However, the original is an 8th century poem, and will be in Old Irish, which has changed a lot. And there are many versions around

See here http://www.irishcultureandcustoms.com/Poetry/StPatrick.html for additional info,

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Maidhc Ó G. (67.235.185.97 - 67.235.185.97)
Posted on Friday, November 21, 2003 - 04:14 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I asked Jeeves and was given a host of different links - most only giving the English. But under a link entitled "Via Rosa - Gaelic Gathering" which lead to this prayer in English and Gaelic. I'm not sure if it's Irish or Scottish or if it's perhaps Old Irish. The last part ends in what is probably Latin.
I tried copying the URL and it wouldn't work. I can come back tomorrow and type in the full translations, but I don't have the time right now (It's pretty long.) _ Maybe if someone has the time, they might try the same search.
I asked " Lorica,St. Patrick ".
Le meas,
-Maidhc.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jessica ní chonchubhair (213.202.165.48 - 213.202.165.48)
Posted on Friday, November 21, 2003 - 07:22 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

is he particularly attached to saint paddy?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

LinzyAnne (68.193.51.55 - 68.193.51.55)
Posted on Friday, November 21, 2003 - 08:18 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Hey my boyfriend sent me something in gaeilge and i wanted to know if someone could tell me what it means.

Gra a thabhaurt do tusa
Thanks
Linzy

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Erin (64.229.29.13 - 64.229.29.13)
Posted on Friday, November 21, 2003 - 10:29 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

does anyone know how to spell ERIN in gaelic?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jessica ní chonchúbhair (213.202.160.154 - 213.202.160.154)
Posted on Saturday, November 22, 2003 - 09:28 am:   Edit Post Print Post

erin as in ireland is Éireann, but for a name im not sure.

grá a thabhairt do tusa litreally means "love to give to you" i think he means i love you!

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jonas (213.243.178.133 - 213.243.178.133)
Posted on Saturday, November 22, 2003 - 12:24 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

The correct phrase is
"Grá a thabhairt duitse", "duitse" is the correct form of "do tusa". Never mind that though, the message is clear enough ;-)

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

LinzyAnne (68.193.51.55 - 68.193.51.55)
Posted on Saturday, November 22, 2003 - 01:10 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Thank you Jessica and Jonas for your translation. :) I'm glad I know what it means now, and that its good.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Monday, November 24, 2003 - 04:42 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Erin is not used as a name in Irish!
The form Jessica gave is correct for the country, it is the genitive of Éire

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Monday, November 24, 2003 - 04:47 am:   Edit Post Print Post

This is the text Maidhc mentioned. It's old Irish.
If Dennis is about he ought to be able to point you to the correct verses.
There is no mention of Tara in this version, and I suspect it was added to the English translation.
I suspect also that what you have is a poem based on this poem, and taking some liberty with it!

Atomriug indiu niurt tréun:
togairm Trindóit
faístin Oendatad,
i nDúlemon dáil.

Atomriug indiu
niurt gene Críst cona bathius,
niurt a chrochtho cona adnacul,
niurt a essérgi cona fhresgabáil,
niurt a thoíniudo fri brithemnas mbrátho.

Atomriug indiu
niurt gráid hiruphin,
i n-aurlataid aingel,
i frestul inna n-archaingel,
i freiscisin esséirgi
ar chiunn fochraicce,
i n-ernaigthib uasalathrach,
i tairchetlaib fáithe,
i preceptaib apstal,
i n-iresaib foísmedach,
i n-enccai noebingen,
i ngnímaib fer firén.

Atomriug indiu
niurt nime,
soilsi gréne,
étrochtai éscai,
áni thened,
déni lóchet,
luaithi gaíthe,
fudomnai mara,
tairismigi thalman,
cobsaidi ailech.

Atomriug indiu
niurt Dé dom luamairecht.
Cumachtae nDé dom chumgabáil,
ciall Dé dom inthús,
rose nDé dom remcisiu,
cluas Dé dom étsecht,
briathar Dé dom erlabrai,
lám Dé dom imdegail,
intech Dé dom remthechtas,
sciath Dé dom imdítin,
sochraite Dé dom anacul
ar intledaib demnae,
ar aslagib dualche,
ar forimthechtaib aicnid,
ar cech duine mídúthrastar dam,
i céin ocus i n-ocus,
i n'uathud ocus i sochaidi.

Tocuiriur etrum indiu inna uili nert-so
fri cech nert n-amnas n-étrocar frista-i dom churp ocus dom anmain,
fri tinchetla sa-ibfh-aithe,
fri dubrechtu gentliuchtae,
fri saíbrechtu heretecdae,
fri imchellacht n-ídlachtae,
fri brichtu ban ocus goban ocus druad,
fri cech fiss arachuille corp ocus anmain duini.

Crist dom imdegail indiu
ar neim, ar loscud, ar bádud, ar guin,
condom-thair ilar fochraicce.
Críst limm, Críst reum,
Críst im degaid,
Críst indium, Críst ísum,
Críst uasum,
Críst desum, Críst tuathum,
Críst i llius, Críst i sius,
Críst i n-erus,
Críst i cridiu cech duini immumrorda,
Críst i ngin cech oín rodom-labrathar,
Críst i cech rusc nonom-dercathar,
Críst i cech cluais rodom-chloathar.

Atomriug indiu niurt tréun:
togairm Trindóit,
cretim Treodatad,
faístin Oendatad,
i nDúlemon dáil.

Domini est salus,
Domini est salus,
Christi est salusñ
salus tua, Domine, sit semper nobiscum.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

James (199.112.55.122 - 199.112.55.122)
Posted on Monday, November 24, 2003 - 06:34 am:   Edit Post Print Post

"The Rune of St. Patrick" "The Lorica of St. Patrick" "The Cry of The Deer".....but what I see from Aonghus is what I know as St. Patrick's Breastplate. I've also heard this referred to as "The Lorica" so no big suprise there, but are the "Rune" and "Cry of the Deer" other terms for the same thing?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Monday, November 24, 2003 - 07:04 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Lorica is a corruption of the Irish word liúreach (must check spelling) - breastplate

The Cry of the Deer refers to the legend that when Laoghaire, the High King, sent a troop out to kill Patrick, who was on his way to Tara, Patrick and his monks chanted this prayer, and all the soldiers saw was some Deer.

I've never heard the name "Rune" being used; I'd be surprised because Rune is a Norse term.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Monday, November 24, 2003 - 07:06 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Hah. typo above. The word is "lúireach"

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

James (199.112.55.122 - 199.112.55.122)
Posted on Monday, November 24, 2003 - 07:16 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Excellent bit of information!

Go raibh mile maith agat, mo chara.

Le meas,

James

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Monday, November 24, 2003 - 07:31 am:   Edit Post Print Post

This link gives a reference to the text above from a novel by Madeleine L'Engle, using the title "Rune"
http://www.geocities.com/branwaedd/p05.html

see also
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Acropolis/8838/sept2/msg00022.html


This is a translation by someone called Charles Mangan

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Larry (217.43.57.197 - 217.43.57.197)
Posted on Monday, November 24, 2003 - 09:29 am:   Edit Post Print Post

If I'm not very much mistaken, Rita Connolly recorded a version of "The Deer's Cry", albeit in English...

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

James (199.112.55.122 - 199.112.55.122)
Posted on Monday, November 24, 2003 - 01:01 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Oddly, I just received a package from my wife today and in it was a book of prayers for deployed Catholics in the military. This prayer is listed there under yet another name: "The Warrior's Breastplate."

Many names but still a beautiful prayer in my opinion. I've actually used part of it in my Irish Language study group (currently on hold while I'm away) to illustrate the concept of the prepositional pronoun.

Ard mheas,

James

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Maidhc Ó G. (67.235.185.182 - 67.235.185.182)
Posted on Monday, November 24, 2003 - 01:46 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Maith thú, a Aonghuis,
You beat me back. A few things came up around the home and I hadn't had the chance to come back in the past cupla days.
But that's exactly the translation that I was able to find.
I don't know what Dennis would recommend, But I myself would go for the final two verses. The English translation I have being,

"I bind unto myself the Name,
The strong Name of the Trinity,
By invocation of the same,
The Three in One and One in Three.

By Whom all nature hath creation,
Eternal Father, Spirit, Word:
Praise to the Lord of my salvation,

Salvation is of Christ the Lord."

Le árd mheas,
-Maidhc.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Maidhc Ó G. (67.235.185.182 - 67.235.185.182)
Posted on Monday, November 24, 2003 - 01:50 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

P.S. The first half of that, "I bind unto....One in Three," is also the very first verse of the poem given. So, actually you'd be using the first and last verses of the poem.
-Maidhc.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Seosamh Mac Muirí (193.1.100.104 - 193.1.100.104)
Posted on Monday, November 24, 2003 - 03:06 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

... I've actually used part of it in my Irish Language study group (currently on hold while I'm away) to illustrate the concept of the prepositional pronoun.


Is maith an obair í sin a Shéamais. Faigheann siad comhthéacs agus meas ar an litríocht leis an gceacht sin.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

cecelia Cooper (193.120.23.122 - 193.120.23.122)
Posted on Tuesday, November 25, 2003 - 08:52 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Thankyou all very much for your help and detailed knowledge of this poem. My brother's name is Patrick and we are of Irish decent so I guess he feels a connection somehow.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Christina (81.131.149.142 - 81.131.149.142)
Posted on Wednesday, November 26, 2003 - 04:07 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I came across this 8th Century prayer a couple of years ago and was curious about its origins.
I was surprised to see how similar it is to "THE CRY OF THE DEER"

I go forth today
in the might of heaven,
in the brighness of the sun,
in the whiteness of snow,
in the splendour of fire,
in the speed of lightening,
in the swiftness of wind,
in the firmness of rock,
I go forth today
In the hand of God.

I'm interested to see what you guys find out about it and whether it is related to Saint Patrick.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Maidhc Ó G. (67.235.185.69 - 67.235.185.69)
Posted on Thursday, November 27, 2003 - 10:39 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Christina, a chara,
The translation I have of the 4th verse of the above given by Aonghus -

I bind unto myself today
The virtues of the star lit heaven,
The glorious sun's life giving ray,
The whiteness of the moon at even,
The flashing of the lightning free,
The whirling wind's tempestuous shocks,
The stable earth, the deep sea salt,
Around the old eternal rocks.

-Maidhc.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Thursday, November 27, 2003 - 11:25 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Christina
the poem attributed to St Patrick is unlikely to have been written by him. He was 5th Century, the poem is at least 8th and possibly later.

There were strong poetic conventions and rules in Old Irish, so it is not surprising that similar concepts are expressed in similar language.

I don't know the poem you've given: can you tell us anything else about it? I googled briefly for the text, but turned up nothing.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Maidhc Ó G. (67.235.185.70 - 67.235.185.70)
Posted on Friday, November 28, 2003 - 04:10 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I typed in a simple search for " Lorica, St. Patrick " straight into the internet and got many with the beginnings of, " I rise today...", "I bind myself..., or, "I arise..."
They're all similar and different.
As Aonghus said, Patrick "was 5th Century, the poem is 8th and possibly later." THe poem was probably written by a monk with great devotion towards St. Patrick, but noone really knows the truth of the legend except for those who may or mayn't've been there.
So, choose your favorite version. They all lend their own flavor and beauty.
-Maidhc.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Christina (213.122.253.20 - 213.122.253.20)
Posted on Saturday, November 29, 2003 - 11:23 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Aonghus agus Maidhc, sorry I can't help you any further,I came across it a couple of years ago by chance and had no information about its origins, but you have confirmed as I expected that it was probably written at a later stage from the original poem. I know St Patrick was fifth century I just hadn't linked my version with the original. Maidhc, thanks for the translation its a good version but I think I'll stick with my original, as it is a favourite.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Maidhc Ó G. (67.235.185.168 - 67.235.185.168)
Posted on Saturday, November 29, 2003 - 01:40 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Fáilte romhat, a Christina,
That's basically my point. Your should keep your favorite. I realy gave the translation to ilustrate that it seems, to me, that most of the shorter versions link themselves to the forth verse of the original(?) because of the ties between God and nature.
Le árd mheas,
-Maidhc.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Tom ODonnell (24.49.84.27 - 24.49.84.27)
Posted on Tuesday, December 02, 2003 - 08:12 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Would anyone know the English translation for the following? I saw this on a bumper sticker at a local Irish Festival.
"Pog Mo Thoín"

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bradford (24.220.0.48 - 24.220.0.48)
Posted on Tuesday, December 02, 2003 - 10:14 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Tom,

Póg mo thóin = Kiss my ass

- Bradford

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dion (24.6.174.223 - 24.6.174.223)
Posted on Thursday, December 04, 2003 - 09:12 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I've seen shirts with that on the back.
dion

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Heidi Manahan (205.188.209.10 - 205.188.209.10)
Posted on Monday, December 08, 2003 - 01:00 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Could someone help me with the english translation for the irish word Armagh. My husband is using it as a prefix to our Morgan Horse Farm. I want to make a sign for Christmas, but would like to add a graphic that relates.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Seosamh Mac Muirí (193.1.100.104 - 193.1.100.104)
Posted on Monday, December 08, 2003 - 01:55 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

You may be surprised to find that it is two words in the original, Heidi.

Ard Mhacha.

'Ard' is height.

The second element is a genitive and is nowadays lenited, officially and otherwise. Placename (read 'public house') lore attributes it to the pre-historic 'Macha', while the lesser-UFO academia offers 'ground cleared for agriculture'.

As you're into horses you shall like the reason for Macha's cursing the Ulaid with the 'ces noiden'. Read on and you shall see what the 'ces noiden' is all about, as if men didn't have it hard enough when times were hard and men were harder.
http://www.homebirth.ie/celticmythshomebirth.htm

The second photo here is of Eamhain Macha : http://www.mcmahonsofmonaghan.org/legend_ulaid.html

As usual, you may find more info under the anglicised form of the name, Navan Fort.

Go n-éirí an t-ainm ceart libh,

S.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Heidi Manahan (152.163.252.163 - 152.163.252.163)
Posted on Friday, December 12, 2003 - 07:05 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Thanks Seosamh for the information. It was very helpful. Is there a city in Irland by this name? If so, Is there any history behind the city and St. Patrick?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (62.77.191.130 - 62.77.191.130)
Posted on Friday, December 12, 2003 - 07:11 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Ard Mhacha is the Irish name for Armagh, of which Patrick is assumes to have been the first bishop. The Primate of All Ireland is still the bishop of Armagh in both the Roman Catholic Church and Church of Ireland (Anglican).

Add Your Message Here
Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.


©Daltaí na Gaeilge