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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2003 (October-December) » Please Help « Previous Next »

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KerryBlue (64.230.150.64 - 64.230.150.64)
Posted on Monday, November 03, 2003 - 12:01 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Some time ago I met a man who had a Kerry Blue Terrier. It had a really neat name. He said it was an Irish translation of the phrase "to be muddy, to play in the mud, or just mud, I do not recall exactly. Does anyone have an idea what it might be. It was a single word.

Thanks

Bill

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Bradford (216.16.15.66 - 216.16.15.66)
Posted on Monday, November 03, 2003 - 12:56 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Perhaps clábar or lábán?

- Bradford

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Seosamh Mac Muirí (193.1.100.104 - 193.1.100.104)
Posted on Monday, November 03, 2003 - 01:38 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Three that I doubt, but care to mention in non-linear thought mode:

Patachán; putachán; puiteachán.

The last is just a possibility.

Ádh mór.
Seosamh

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KerryBlue (64.230.151.103 - 64.230.151.103)
Posted on Monday, November 03, 2003 - 02:56 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Thanks for the posts so far, It may also mean Marsh Land or something to that effect.

Your help is appreciated

Thanks

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Maidhc Ó G. (67.235.185.220 - 67.235.185.220)
Posted on Monday, November 03, 2003 - 03:40 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Portach? Caorán? - Both mean bog.
Maidhc.

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James (199.112.55.122 - 199.112.55.122)
Posted on Tuesday, November 04, 2003 - 01:24 am:   Edit Post Print Post

OK, this has absolutely nothing to do with this dog's name but it does tie into english words borrowed from Irish.

Clábar given above for muddy strikes a cord from my youth. My Grandma used to make "Clabber" biscuits. These were biscuits made completely from scratch with some flour and water and only Grandma knows what else. At any rate, the consistency was not unlike mud in the pre-cooked state. Given that our part of the world (Rural Southeast US) was heavily populated by Irish and Scots emigrants I'm willing to make this etymological leap.

Sorry for the diversion but I found this very interesting.

Le meas,

James

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Julia (12.91.184.180 - 12.91.184.180)
Posted on Tuesday, November 04, 2003 - 06:58 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

James,

I dunno if this is what you're looking for but there is a baking powder by the name of "Clabber Girl"...maybe there is a web-site that gives the history...I'm gonna look now (sorry for the slangy language, when I'm tired I lapse into NewYorkese). Take care, Julia

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Julia (12.91.184.180 - 12.91.184.180)
Posted on Tuesday, November 04, 2003 - 07:22 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

James,

Boy, that was the most fun I've had in a long while...okey dokey, the Clabber Girl product was produced by guys from Germany back in the 1800's but you were right, in my Random House dictionary the word clabber is a noun from "bonnyclabber"..to become thick in souring (kinda like what I do when I run out of buttermilk, I add vinegar to regular milk and let it sit for a while) but it's from (Irish) bainne clabair. I took a quick look at my beloved Brewer's Dictionary and they list Bonny-clabber as sour buttermilk used as a drink (Irish bainne, (milk); claba (thick or thickened) which leads us to your Grandma's biscuits and whether or not she used the "Clabber Girl" or the vinegar in milk we'll never know but I'm sure they were great. Go raibh maith agat for that diversion... I always wondered what the devil a "Clabber Girl" was!!!

Le meas, Julia

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James (199.112.55.122 - 199.112.55.122)
Posted on Wednesday, November 05, 2003 - 01:01 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Julia,

Thanks for the clarification! I just LOVE this type of etymological stuff.

You are correct....Grandma's biscuits were awesome. The only one's better are my Mom's. She actually sent me some when I was stationed in Korea a few years back. Popped those suckers in the microwave......ohhhhhh what a taste from home!

Thanks again for the research effort...too cool!

James

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Oliver Grennan (217.155.45.122 - 217.155.45.122)
Posted on Wednesday, November 05, 2003 - 08:51 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Maith an fear, James, you were right! I thought it was a very long shot. I learn something new everytime I come here.

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