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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2003 (April-June) » 2003 (April-June) » "Fairy" « Previous Next »

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Grahill (cache-dq08.proxy.aol.com - 205.188.209.140)
Posted on Thursday, September 19, 2002 - 03:10 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Need the spelling, in Gaelic for the English word "Fairy"

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James (wcs1.norfolk.nipr.mil - 198.26.132.101)
Posted on Thursday, September 19, 2002 - 03:53 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Sibhe is what comes to mind. Could be wrong.

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sam (cache-loh-ae04.proxy.aol.com - 195.93.49.10)
Posted on Thursday, September 19, 2002 - 07:04 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

a chairde,
In my Irish dictionary 'focloir scoile'
it gives síog = fairy agus síofra = sprite,changeling
hope this helps
slan go foill
Sam

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Antaine (194.165.171.218)
Posted on Thursday, September 19, 2002 - 07:19 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

"Learners English/Irish Dictionary" by Ó Siochfhradha has:

fairy = sióg, síofra, na daoine maithe

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alec1 (m7-mp1.cvx1-a.dub.dial.ntli.net - 62.254.100.7)
Posted on Friday, September 20, 2002 - 04:32 am:   Edit Post Print Post

síog=fairy


Síoga


Cónaíonn na sióga ar an gnoc
Is bíonn siad ag súgradh is ag léim,
Ní bhacann siad le rud ar bith.

Nuair a bhím in airde ar an gcrann
Feicim iad faoin ngrian.
Nuair a chuaigh mé i mbun na leabhar aréir
D'fhéach mé amach an fhuinneog
Bhí siad ag canadh go sásta, na sióga.

Ach ansin chonaic mé solas.
Bhí sé go hálainn.
Agus chuaigh mé a chodladh.

Nuair a d'éirigh mé ar maidin
Ní raibh sióg ar bith ann.
Nuair a chuaigh mé amach
Thosaigh mé ag crith...
Agus dúirt mé slán leo.

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alec1 (m52-mp1.cvx1-b.dub.dial.ntli.net - 62.254.104.52)
Posted on Friday, September 20, 2002 - 07:39 am:   Edit Post Print Post


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alec1 (m41-mp1.cvx1-b.dub.dial.ntli.net - 62.254.104.41)
Posted on Friday, September 20, 2002 - 08:09 am:   Edit Post Print Post


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James (wcs1.norfolk.nipr.mil - 198.26.132.101)
Posted on Friday, September 20, 2002 - 09:13 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Also may consider Bean sí (Fairy Woman). In traditional Irish mythology she is not the evil spirit popularized in Darby O'Gill but merely a woman who inabits the fairy mounds.

Another variation of síofra is síofróg which Ó DÓNAILL defines as an "elf-woman, fairy" or "Enchantress"

Disregard my earlier suggestion as the meanderings of an overburdened mind.

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Grahill (cache-dq08.proxy.aol.com - 205.188.209.140)
Posted on Friday, September 20, 2002 - 06:38 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I appreciate all responses. Doesn't seem quite right. Perhaps "Gaelic" is not what I'm after. I need the "old" IRISH for "fairy." One I got was "fairie" another was "fayie" If you can help it will be appreciated.

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alec1 (m40-mp1.cvx1-b.dub.dial.ntli.net - 62.254.104.40)
Posted on Friday, September 20, 2002 - 06:45 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Maybe this is yopur type of Faery?


Where dips the rocky highland of Sleuth Wood in the lake,
There lies a leafy island where flapping herons wake
The drowsy water-rats.
There we’ve hid our fairy vats full of berries,
And of reddest stolen cherries.
Come away, O, human child!
To the woods and waters wild with a fairy hand in hand,
For the worlds more full of weeping than you can understand.

Where the wave of moonlight glosses the dim gray sand with light,
Far off by farthest Rosses we foot it all the night,
Weaving olden dances, Mingling hands, and mingling glances,
Till the moon has taken flight;
To and fro we leap, and chase the frothy bubbles;
While the world is full of troubles.
And is anxious in its sleep.
Come away! O, human child! To the woods and waters wild.
With a fairy hand in hand,
For the world’s more full of weeping than you can understand.

Where the wandering water gushes from the hills above Glen-Car,
In pools among the rushes, that scarce could bathe a star,
We seek for slumbering trout, And whispering in their ears;
We give them evil dreams,
Leaning softly out from ferns that drop their tears
Of dew on the young streams.
Come! O human child! To the woods and waters wild,
With a fairy hand in hand,
For the world’s more full of weeping than you can understand.

Away with us, he’s going, the solemn-eyed;
He’ll hear no more the lowing of the calves on the warm hill-side.
Or the kettle on the hob sing peace into his breast;
Or see the brown mice bob round and round the oatmeal chest.
For he comes the human child, to the woods and waters wild,
With a fairy hand in hand,
For the world’s more full of weeping than he can understand.


William Butler Yeats

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Grahill (cache-dq08.proxy.aol.com - 205.188.209.140)
Posted on Friday, September 20, 2002 - 06:50 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Alec 1....................thank you, thank you, that's it

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Ailís ní hAllmhúráin (213-98-215-172.uc.nombres.ttd.es - 213.98.215.172)
Posted on Friday, September 27, 2002 - 12:59 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Dia daoibh, a chairde!


What's the correct Irish spelling for the word Banshee? I've seen it written as Bean Sidhe, Bean Sith and Bean Sí.

Is there any word to refer to a human-fae hybrid? If there isn't any, what is the word for hybrid/crossbreed? If possible, with non-offensive connotations (that is, tell me which ones would be applicable only for people and which ones for animals, etc).


Is mise le meas,
Ailís ní hAllmhúráin

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Ectaliel (80.254.3.194 - 80.254.3.194)
Posted on Saturday, May 17, 2003 - 04:17 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Tell me please,the base of the Elven language composed by J.R.R. Tolkien is celtic language?

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Phil (159.134.209.65 - 159.134.209.65)
Posted on Saturday, May 17, 2003 - 07:21 am:   Edit Post Print Post

"Celtic Language" is like saying "European Country". It doesn't refer to any specific country, but it is a category into which a country may fall.

Celtic Languages
----------------

Gaeilge
Manx
Breatnaish
Cornish


There's a few I know.

-

In response to Ailís:

There's no Gaeilge equivilent of "hybrid", but my dictionary gives "hibrid", which is obviously just taken from English.

I'm Irish, and the word we use most for a crossbred animal is "mongrel", especially for dogs. None of my dictionaries give a word for "mongrel".

"crossbreed" = "idirphró" or "crosphró".

If you're talking about breeding a human person with an animal, then feel free to use any word you want, you're only gonna offend priests. As for breeding say between a black and white or asian person ( I realize that breeding isn't a very pretty word to use here ), then use "multiracial".

multiracial = "ilchiníoch"


-Phil

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Íosac Mac Daibhéid (216.221.81.99 - 216.221.81.99)
Posted on Sunday, May 18, 2003 - 05:06 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Ectaliel, I assume you're talking about Sindarin. Sindarin is based on Welsh, mostly. It has the lenition, which is common to all Insular Celtic languages, but it sounds Welsh, and I've read that Tolkien had the Welsh language in mind when he created Sindarin.

The Celtic languages that are still spoken are:

Irish (Gaeilge)
Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig)
Manx (Gaelck or Gailg)*
Welsh (Cymraeg)
Breton (Brezhoneg)
Cornish (Kernowek)*

The first three are the Goidelic, or Gaelic languages, and the second three are Brythonic, or Brittonic languages. The Gaelic languages developed in Ireland and spread from there to Scotland and the Isle of Man; the Brythonic languages developed on the big British Island. What is now England, Wales, and Cornwall (and southern Scotland, come to that). Breton is spoken on the Mainland, but that's because when the Angles, Saxons, Jutes and Frisians were invading, in the power vaccuum left by the departure of the Romans, there was a lot of displacement of Celtic peoples, and many of them up and moved to Armorica, which was later called Brittany, or Little Britain, because of the Brythonic settlers.


* Cornish and Manx are not, by some people's definitions, living languages. They ceased to be taught to children as native languages at some point. I'm not sure about Cornish, but Manx has never ceased to be spoken. When it's learned, it's generally learned as an adult, and the speakers tend to be amateur or professional linguists.

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Ectaliel (80.254.3.194 - 80.254.3.194)
Posted on Thursday, May 22, 2003 - 08:05 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Wow... Thank you... Great.
I know few yet about Ireland. This country is like a dwelling of fairy-tales and riddles. There`s something mystical,I guess... or I`m not right?

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Phil (159.134.209.155 - 159.134.209.155)
Posted on Thursday, May 22, 2003 - 01:47 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

You obviously haven't been to Temple Bar, Dublin City Centre. Or O'Connell street at midnight.

-Phil

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Ectaliel (80.254.3.194 - 80.254.3.194)
Posted on Sunday, May 25, 2003 - 04:40 am:   Edit Post Print Post

:):):)Once I`ll visit these places,I hope.

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Phil (159.134.209.36 - 159.134.209.36)
Posted on Sunday, May 25, 2003 - 07:15 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Dublin City Centre has the highest concentration of weirdos in the whole of Ireland. Temple Bar is full of rockers/goths. I wouldn't suggest a visit, unless you want something to laugh at. And O'Connell street, nice place, but wouldn't suggest it at night, unless ofcourse you bring a weapon. O'Connell street has the highest crime rate in the whole of Ireland. There's numerous assults, attacks, fights, muggings, even rapes and murders sometimes, and that's EVERY night. The cover of "The Evening Hearld", Ireland's no.1 newspaper, about a 3 weeks ago was "Streets of blood and vomit". The front page and another page was dedicated to none other than O'Connell Street.

-Phil

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Spíd (193.122.47.178 - 193.122.47.178)
Posted on Sunday, May 25, 2003 - 12:13 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Yes, but it's mystical vomit :-)

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Ectaliel (80.254.3.194 - 80.254.3.194)
Posted on Sunday, May 25, 2003 - 04:02 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I want to Ireland!:( I`m in Ukraine now...

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Phil (159.134.209.204 - 159.134.209.204)
Posted on Monday, May 26, 2003 - 04:30 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

As I read that there I wondered why so many people call "Ukraine" "The Ukraine"?

I was in the Ukraine.

strange


-Phil

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