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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2002 (January-June) » Names and translations - please help! « Previous Next »

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Crystal (216.26.216.224)
Posted on Friday, February 15, 2002 - 04:17 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Dia daoibh:
I am Canadian with Irish heritage (grandpa from Inniskillen)and out of repect for him and the Irish people, I do want to learn to speakGaelic. I have never been the world's best language student but this means a lot to me and what little I have heard spoken was truly beautiful. I'm grateful for the tips I have already read on this board and would appreciate any further advise you may have. I have heard that the "Teach Yourself" Gaelic book and tapes are good. What do you think? Any suggestions
Also, I am soon to bring home a new baby - a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, which you may or may not know, originated in the UK. I would very much like to name this little one with an Irish name. I have in mind something along the lines of Royal dog, Royal boy, Royal child, special, dear, child. You get the idea. And the only translation for dog that I was able to find was cu, which I believe is hounddog and not appropriate. I would very much appreciate any help and I will be back to this site for help when I start my Gaelic study.Post here or E-mail me at jingles82@hotmail.com
Slan, Chrissy

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Bob Clark (d252.as1.clev.oh.voyager.net - 209.81.166.253)
Posted on Friday, February 15, 2002 - 09:51 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

http://www.bbc.co.uk/northernireland/blas/learners_main.shtml

Chrissy,
If you're just starting, try the above email address for a series of 30 weekly lessons, which you can play using realaudio. It's the Ulster dialect, a bit different from many of the book/cassette programs out there, but not so different that you couldn't easily adjust if you graduate to a book/cassette program. If you can afford the time and the money, I've heard great things about the Daltai total immersion week in July, as well as the Oideas Gael program in Gleann Cholm Cille, county Donegal, Ireland. I'm a beginner too, so I'll wish us both luck! I think the word for dog is "madra."
Slán go foill!
Bob

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Bocstaí (proxy2.dcu.ie - 136.206.1.18)
Posted on Saturday, February 16, 2002 - 07:08 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Check out the folowing sites.
www.acmhainn.ie
www.beo.ie
www.oideas-gael.com
www.fainne.org
www.eo-feasa.com
www.gaelsaoire.com

With regard to the dog, how about Scibilín /scib a lean/
no particular meaning but its a dog's name.

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Chrissy (216.26.216.184)
Posted on Saturday, February 16, 2002 - 11:36 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Thanks folks.
That was helpful. I will check out those sites and if anyone has further advise I am more than willing to listen.
I would also be interested in getting a translation for the phrase: Cymru fo am byth! It is from the song, Men of Harlech and I believe it is some sort of cry to battle. Any ideas?
Thanks Again for your willingness to help.

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Seosamh Mac Muirí (proxy-server3.ul.ie - 136.201.1.52)
Posted on Monday, February 18, 2002 - 11:16 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Chrissy, a Chara,

Is there a little something extra here, in your post?

'Cymru am byth' is 'Wales forever'.

Guím gach rath ar do chuid foghlama. / Good luck with your effort.

Bain sult as / Enjoy it.

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Aonghus (vpn.parthus.com - 62.221.5.1)
Posted on Tuesday, February 19, 2002 - 03:47 am:   Edit Post Print Post

And the phrase is Welsh, rather than Irish

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Seosamh (0-1pool240-77.nas19.new-york2.ny.us.da.qwest.net - 65.144.240.77)
Posted on Tuesday, February 19, 2002 - 11:49 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Chrystal: "Teach Yourself Gaelic" is for learning Scots Gaelic. There is a corresponding volume in the same series (with tapes) called "Teach Yourself Irish". That's what you want, although there are better ways to learn the language than that particular title. People above give you good suggestions. The BBC/Blas introduction that Bob Clark mentions would probably be a good start. The book and tapes entitled "Now You're Talking/ Irish on Your Own" would be good too, maybe together with or after the BBC intro. It's a course in Ulster Irish (I don't know which title is in the bookshops in Canada, but it's the same book.)

Cù is the Scots Gaelic word for dog, madra or madah is most common in Irish Gaelic (where cù means 'hound). 'Bran' is maybe the best known dog in Irish literature and folklore. Sceolaing, Caoldubh and Adhnuall are others, Setanta is another. Spota can be used from English.

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