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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2002 (January-June) » Present tense habitual « Previous Next »

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Lisa ORourke (caribbean-34.dialin.uakron.edu - 130.101.31.35)
Posted on Sunday, January 20, 2002 - 01:39 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Is there a present tense habitual for verbs other than tá? Is it that it can be implied or is it seperate? We had questions regarding "Cuirimid ag imirt cluichí iad." etc in lesson 127 of the second Buntus book.
Any help is appreciated.
Thank you all so much for the previous suggestions. I have been to the solas site and used their quiz. It is fun. I also liked finding answers to the "Progress in Irish" book. I am nearly through it without knowing if I was right or not. It does make you work harder when you can't check so quickly. Thanks again, Lisa

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Seosamh (3cust45.tnt48.nyc3.da.uu.net - 67.193.93.45)
Posted on Sunday, January 20, 2002 - 06:47 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

There is only one present tense for verbs (other than tá) in the indicative mood in Irish. (There is also a present subjunctive.)

The present tense in Irish was explained to me in the beginning as habitual but that seems to be basically true of English as well. Irish seems to allow for the same nonhabitual exceptions as English. For example, verbs of perception or saying can describe either habitual or in-the-moment activity: Cluinim é sin go minic. I hear that often. (habitual) Cluinim an t-éan anois. I hear the bird now. (present)

Feicim anois iad. I see them now. Ní thuigeann sé. He doesn't understand. Ní airím ró-mhaith. I don't feel too good (either right now or regularly). I don't hear too well. Deirim go bhfuil sé sin mícheart. I say that that is not right.

There is the dramatic usage in story-telling and narration: Téann sí isteach. Suíonn sí síos. Dearcann sí thart. She goes inside. She sits down. She looks about. The title of Alan Titley's play "Tagann Godot" uses the present tense that way: Godot comes.

There may be differences between the two languages that aren't coming to mind. Maybe others here will help. The future tense of the verb 'caith' is used for both future and present action: Caithfidh mé ceann nua a cheannach. I must/have to buy a new one. I will/shall have to buy a new one. But after 'má' (if) you would revert to the present: Má chaitheann tú imeacht, tuigim. If you have to leave, I understand.

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Lisa ORourke (ontario45-145.infoserv.uakron.edu - 130.101.2.145)
Posted on Monday, January 21, 2002 - 08:06 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Thank you so much for the answer. Your help is very appreciated. Lisa

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