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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2000 (January-June) » "grab a few winks of sleep" « Previous Next »

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Nani (spider-wa073.proxy.aol.com - 205.188.192.53)
Posted on Friday, February 25, 2000 - 01:52 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

How would you suggest to someone to "grab a few winks of sleep", (or perhaps just say "take a nap") in Irish Gaelic?

Does the word "Lochdain" or "lochd" mean "a wink of sleep"?

Thank you to anyone who can help with this!

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Aonghus (cw02.b1.srv.t-online.de - 212.185.252.2)
Posted on Friday, February 25, 2000 - 02:24 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

"Glac sos" is take a rest/nap.
I would tend to say "Bíodh coladh beag agat", i.e. take a little sleep. De Bhaldraithe confirms me on "néal codlata" as being a nap.

I've never heard of "lochd" or "lochdain", nor can I find them either in Ó Donaill or Dineen.

Lochta is a loft, where perhaps someone might sleep.

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Seosamh
Posted on Friday, February 25, 2000 - 02:29 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Lig néal (codlata). Or, Déan néal codlata. Instead of 'néal codlata', you could also say 'dreas codlata'. (Pronounced roughly LIG/DJAYN NAYL KOLL-uh-tuh or DRASS ...)

Lochd and lochdan ar Scots Gaelic. I don't think they would be part of any Irish speaker's vocabulary. Maybe some Ulster speakers would have them?

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Nani (spider-we051.proxy.aol.com - 205.188.195.41)
Posted on Friday, February 25, 2000 - 06:49 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Thanks so much (!) to both of you on your responses. I saw lochdain in a Scots/Gaelic dictionary (MacBains)--it was lochdan, but it listed "lochdain" as the Irish form. So that is where I got that idea from.

So what is the literal translation of "glac sos"?
I guess glac is "to take"? and "sos" is....?

And can you say just "lig néal", or must you say "lig néal codlata"? And how does that literally translate?

thank you!

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Seosamh (1cust190.tnt10.nyc1.da.uu.net - 63.16.18.190)
Posted on Saturday, February 26, 2000 - 12:01 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Nani, If McBains gives 'lochdain' as Irish, then the word must have been in Irish Gaelic too. Not just in Old Irish as it happens, because I see that Dinneen's Irish-English Dictionary has lochadh or locht as meaning 'sleep, nap'. I don't know if it's still used or where. Maybe some one else can tell us.

Lig néal (codlata) means 'let (out) a nap (of sleep)'. As far as I know, you could use either. Néal basically means 'cloud' and also various kinds of cloudlike states. You can also say, 'Lig néal de chodladh.' 'Glac sos' means 'take a break/respite' but fits the situation.

At this hour, I assume my answer won't collide with similar info from Aongus, as happened above. But maybe he can add to this. Next a definitive study on sleep in Irish, Scots and Manx Gaelic. Codlah sámh.

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Nani (spider-wl021.proxy.aol.com - 205.188.199.26)
Posted on Saturday, February 26, 2000 - 04:44 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Seosamh,
Thank you again for your help on this.
I am sorry to be so dense...But when you said, "As far as I know, you could use either", then you ARE saying that both "Lig néal codlata" as well as more simple, just " Lig néal" would appropriately convey the meaning, "take a nap"?
Sorry to ask again, but I was not perfectly clear on your answer, and didn't want to end up conveying the idea "let a cloud" or something, by leaving out an essential word! :)

Also, I was reading the posting listed just above this one, entitled "sleep well" and was wondering:
If coladh sámh, translates "sleep well", then would it be possible to say "dream well" (to convey the idea "sweet dreams" or "pleasant dreams") by simply replacing the word coladh, with the appropriate word for "dream"(which would be....?) Or does it not work that way?
Also, is your "Codlah sámh" at the end of your posting, the same thing as coladh sámh? I have also seen it spelled, "Codladh sámh"--so now I am quite confused!
Do you know if there is a good online Irish Gaelic dictionary?
MacBain's is a good online dictionary, but since it is Scottish Gaelic, it is not too helpful with the Irish.
(The only translation I found in MacBain's for "sos" was, "a coarse mess or mixture", so I guess the Irish meaning for "sos" must be quite different and from different roots, if it means "rest" or "break"!)

Go raimh maith agat

(Hopefully I got that right!--thank you)
Nani

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