Daltai na Gaeilge
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how would you say in Irish?
Posted: 16 March 2017 09:28 AM   Ignore ]  
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Get your Irish on!

We are looking to put it on a bumper sticker for our Irish Group

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Posted: 17 March 2017 04:23 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]  
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Do you mean the slogan that is typically found on St Patrick’s Day T-shirts? In that case, perhaps “Múscail an Gael/Gaeilgeoir ionat” (“Awaken the Gael/Irish-speaker in you”)?

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Posted: 22 April 2017 09:53 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]  
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I am looking for a cute catchy phrase to add to a bumper sticker to advertise our group and boost membership

our motto is “Ní neart go cur le chéile” but thought something like Get your irish on would be better

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Posted: 24 April 2017 10:05 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]  
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Cuir ort gaelach.
Cuir gaelach ort.
Cuir gaelach ort féin.

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Posted: 27 April 2017 12:49 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]  
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Des Nolan - 24 April 2017 10:05 AM

Cuir ort gaelach.
Cuir gaelach ort.
Cuir gaelach ort féin.

I’m not sure this works. “Gaelach” is an adjective, but “cuir ort” has to be followed by a noun (=put on + your clothes etc). There’s another verb “gléas” which would perhaps work better in such a sentence, e.g. Gléas thú féin ar an nós Gaelach (dress yourself the Irish way). But I don’t know if that’s very catchy. smile

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Posted: 30 April 2017 02:06 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]  
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The only thing not already suggested that occurs to me is something like “tabhair faoin nGaeilge” or “tabhair faoi do chuid Gaeilge.”  I’m not sure if it has the desired connotation though.

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Posted: 30 April 2017 07:30 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]  
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Héilics Órbhuí - 30 April 2017 02:06 AM

The only thing not already suggested that occurs to me is something like “tabhair faoin nGaeilge” or “tabhair faoi do chuid Gaeilge.”  I’m not sure if it has the desired connotation though.


Nach fearr labhairt i nGaeilge ná fúithi?

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Posted: 30 April 2017 11:43 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]  
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‘Tabhair’, chan ‘labhair.’

‘tabhairt faoi’ rud, i.e. get something started, undertake something, muna bhfuil dul amú orm.

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Posted: 30 April 2017 12:06 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]  
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Héilics Órbhuí - 30 April 2017 11:43 AM

‘Tabhair’, chan ‘labhair.’

‘tabhairt faoi’ rud, i.e. get something started, undertake something, muna bhfuil dul amú orm.

Faraor, mo shúile!

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Posted: 02 May 2017 11:17 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]  
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I posted (Des Nolan - 24 April 2017 10:05 AM)

Cuir ort gaelach.
Cuir gaelach ort.
Cuir gaelach ort féin.

Somebody replied

“I’m not sure this works. “Gaelach” is an adjective, but “cuir ort” has to be followed by a noun (=put on + your clothes etc). There’s another verb “gléas” which would perhaps work better in such a sentence, e.g. Gléas thú féin ar an nós Gaelach (dress yourself the Irish way). But I don’t know if that’s very catchy. smile”

I learnt something new, but then I would suggest

Cuir ort Gaeilge.
Cuir ort do Ghaeilge.

(First item confirmed as acceptable to me by one native speaker form Galway.)

Sin é mo dhá phingin, ach níl mé ach mac léinn mé féinféin

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Posted: 03 May 2017 02:53 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]  
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I see. Usually, you would say “chuir mé Gaeilge air” (I put Irish on him, i.e. “I addressed him in Irish”) or “chuir sé Gaeilge orm” (“He addressed me in Irish”), rather than “cuirim Gaeilge orm” or “cuir Gaeilge ort”. But if your native speaker confirms that you can also turn this expression round, then why not? Still, from a grammatical point of view, I think it should be “Cuir ort do chuid Gaeilge” and perhaps also “Cuir ort an Ghaeilge” (with a definite article).

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Posted: 03 May 2017 03:45 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]  
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I’m pretty dubious, to be honest.  I’d need more info to really judge - is this person really a native speaker, what criteria is used to say that (I have seen “native speakers” who grew up speaking the language in some situations but don’t even fit any metric for fluency).  “Cuir ort gaelach”, “cuir gaelach ort”, etc. these all seem totally wrong to me.  “Cuir ort Gaeilge” seems less wrong but still not right and probably doesn’t mean what you want it to even if it were.

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Posted: 03 May 2017 10:55 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]  
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A chara Héilics Órbhuí, I wonder what your own Irish credentials are, I do see you post frequently here, which suggests your more experienced than myself, I would normally defer to you, but I’m having difficulty seeing where you actually come out on this. Based on the original request “get your Irish on” I’m okay with Onuvanja’s suggestion “Cuir ort do chuid Gaeilge”. All-in-all, I was trying to keep it shorter for a bumper sticker. Anyways, I look forward to getting the opinion of my 5 nephews going to the Gaelscoileanna when I go home in August, it should prove interesting. I did enjoy the exchange of ideas here. Des

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Posted: 03 May 2017 01:40 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]  
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My “credentials”?  lol..  I never claimed to have any.  If you enjoyed the exchange of ideas a much as you say you do, you’d be able to exchange ideas without being so defensive.

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Posted: 04 May 2017 12:53 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]  
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For what it’s worth, I think the idea to use “cuir ort” is a great one! First of all, it’s short as already mentioned by Des, and second, it plays on the same metaphor of getting dressed as the English original “Get your Irish on” (“get your kit on” etc). Now what we need is a confirmation from a native speaker or speakers that it actually works in Irish and gets the message across. Between the lot of us, we’ll get there!

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Posted: 04 May 2017 04:09 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]  
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I don’t have such a problem with “cuir ort do chuid Gaeilge”, which sounds more natural and is at least grammatically correct.  I was actually thinking today about the English version of the construction “get your X on” and how there are two ways of interpreting this.  The first is, as you say, like “get your clothes on”, etc. where you’re saying to physically put it on yourself.  The other, which is how I interpret it in my head when I hear it, is like “get your drink on”, i.e. get something started, start to do something (it’s not really implied that you’re putting anything on yourself, but that the activity itself is commencing - “let’s get it on” is another example of this, where you’re saying let’s start doing “it”).  “Get your Irish on” seems to fall more into the latter category, in my opinion, but it’s open to interpretation, I suppose.

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