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Translating Songs
Posted: 21 December 2016 05:21 AM   Ignore ]  
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Dia daoibh,

My Irish is very extremely basic but trying to improve it by translating songs into English with the help of an online dictionary and a bit of basic knowledge. If this is the right place I’m on the right path with the below?


(Chuir mé) mo (mhian amú)
(I put) my (wasted desire)


Níl aon mhaith (leis faoi rún)
Not any good (to be secret?) [as in Ros na Rún?] raspberry


Gan bheith ag breathnú amuigh
Without being at looking outside? [Not sure]


Ach (d’imigh mé) (ar strae)
But I left lost


Go raith maith agat

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Posted: 21 December 2016 05:37 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]  
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I’m not totally fluent, but reasonably!

 

1- I wasted my desire

2- ?? It’s no good ?being a secret .. .. ??

3- Without looking outside .. .. ag breathnú = looking

4- but I went astray/ I got lost

 

(hopefully, someone else will come up with a better go at 2

le dea-ghuí Eadaoin

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Posted: 22 December 2016 07:15 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]  
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Go raibh míle maith agat!

So is Chuir mé ..... amú a way of saying I wasted ....., as in Chuir me sé amú would mean I wasted it?


Got some other ones if that’s ok:


(Ni raibh mé) do (gu) do chuartu
I was not seeking you?
I know do is your in irish but it doesn’t seem to fit

 

(Níl uaim) anam ar bith
I don’t want any soul?
(Although shouldn’t it be Níl anam uaim ar bith?)

 

Chugat atá mé ag rith
To you I am running


Tá fhios a’am gur tú an te
I know you are that person? Stumped

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Posted: 22 December 2016 01:58 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]  
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Níl a bhuíochas ort!


Chuir mé é amú .. é, not sé (because “it” is the object, not the one wasting) .. I’m not sure how the idiom works precisely
amú is wasted, astray, lost, misled etc

To say"I wasted the day” I think you’d say “Chuaigh an lá amú orm” = The day was wasted away on me/ the day went astray on me” .. .. I’ve often said in English ” ah, the whole thing went wrong on me!”

 

The first “do” isn’t “your” .. .. I can’t explain the grammar - we need an expert to jump in here to help
I think it works as a connecting word??

 

?? I’m not missing a soul ..  I don’t need any soul(person??)

 

I’m running to you (probably emphasis on YOU)

 

I know you are the one (?as in the one and only person?)

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Posted: 23 December 2016 09:44 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]  
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Tá sé go maith seo!


Ceithre níos:


Is léir go bhfuil fonn
It’s clear the desire


Go leor an a bheith ann
enough time/existence? Níl a fhios agam


Oíche fhada romhainn
a long night coming


(Cibe áit) a théánn mo stóirín
wherever to go my darling

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Posted: 23 December 2016 12:21 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]  
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1. .. .. can you give us the next line as well


2. ?? AM? ..not AN?
plenty/enough time there ... needs a bit of context

 

3. a long night in front of us (literally)

 

4. (wherever) my darling goes .. .. .. téann sí = she goes

 


eadaoin

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Posted: 27 December 2016 02:05 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]  
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It’s difficult to translate isolated lines without knowing what comes next.
Usually “dúil” would mean desire, as in longing.  “Fonn” means more an inclination, fancy. 
“Oíche fhada romhainn” means a long night ahead of us. 
“Cibé áit a dtéann”, if I’m not mistaken.  When you’re talking about place, manner, etc. you use the indirect relative, so eclipsis not lenition
The explanation of “do do chuartú” is that the first “do” is the preposition, meaning “for” generally, and the second one is “do” meaning “your”.  The logic of the syntax you could think of like “for your searching”.  This is just how the syntax works because there is no genitive of the personal pronouns, meaning ordinarily you would say “Tá mé ag cuartú X” where X is in the genitive of the object (the thing you’re searching for), but if it’s a personal pronoun it’s “Tá mé do X cuartú” where X is the possessive pronoun that agrees with the object, ex. tá sé do mo chuartú” he is looking for me).  Someone else might explain this better, but there it is. 
“Rith chomh fada leat / a fhad leat” is probably better for running to you, implying you run all the way up to the person, not just towards them.  That’s my opinion anyways. 
“Breathnú amach” not “amuigh”, as you’re looking in a direction.  “Amuigh” is if you are looking while you’re outside, not that you’re looking outward. 

I probably missed some but hopefully that helps.

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Posted: 10 January 2017 09:35 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]  
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Go raibh maith agat

Sorry I’ve been away and thanks for all the replies. I’m hoping to get to a point of being able to understand the gist of Irish but still a long way off


@ eadaoin

Next line after Is léir go bhfuil fonn is Go leor am a bheith ann, the whole stanza is:


Is léir go bhfuil fonn
Go leor am a bheith ann
Oíche fhada romhainn
Cíbe áit a théann mo stórín


To which I’ve currrenty got (thanks to yourself and Héilics)

It’s clear the fancy?
enough time there
a long night in front of us
wherever my darling goes


about right?

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Posted: 10 January 2017 09:50 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]  
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@ Héilics


Cibé áit a dtéann mo stórín in place of Cíbe áit a théann mo stórín- The lyrics are just copied from the song rather than my own verse, but that’s not to say they got it right themselves of course.


“do do chuartú”
Interesting, so the first means “for” in the context of looking “for” someone, but not in the context of looking “for” an object?

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Posted: 10 January 2017 09:55 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]  
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Next stanza smile


Hey, chas mé ortsa
Níl fhios a’a, an féidir
Seo dhuit m’uimhir
Cuir glaoch orm b’fhédir


I got from that:
Hey, I turned to you
I don’t know, maybe?
This is my number to you (for you)?
Please call me maybe


Probably far off

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Posted: 10 January 2017 12:40 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]  
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“do do chuartú”
Interesting, so the first means “for” in the context of looking “for” someone, but not in the context of looking “for” an object?

No.  Maybe I explained that badly.  I meant that the first “do” is the preposition usually associated with “for” in English, i.e. dom = for me, duit = for you.  But prepositions are never perfectly corresponding to one another from language to language, i.e. inis dom = tell me (there’s no “for” there, and in this case it means something more like “to me”, i.e. tell it to me).

In this case “do” is just the word you use instead of “ag” in this construction.  Apparently I lack the ability to explain this properly, but just understand that it looks like (depending on what you’re looking for):
Táim ag cuartú ___ (genitive) = i am looking for _____
Táim á chuartú = i am looking for it
Táim do do chuartú = i am looking for you

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Posted: 10 January 2017 05:13 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]  
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Is léir go bhfuil fonn
Go leor am a bheith ann
Oíche fhada romhainn
Cíbe áit a théann mo stórín

To which I’ve currrenty got (thanks to yourself and Héilics)
It’s clear the fancy?
enough time there
a long night in front of us
wherever my darling goes

It’s clear there’s a desire/fancy
to have the time
a long night ahead of us
wherever my love/darling goes

Hey, chas mé ortsa
Níl fhios a’a, an féidir
Seo dhuit m’uimhir
Cuir glaoch orm b’fhédir

I got from that:
Hey, I turned to you
I don’t know, maybe?
This is my number to you (for you)?
Please call me maybe

You’re close. 

“Chas mé ortsa” = I met you
“Seo dhuit m’uimhir” = here’s my number

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Posted: 11 January 2017 07:57 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]  
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Cheers!


Next one:

‘S bíonn tóir ormsa
Idir óg is aosta
(Repeat) Seo dhuit m’uimhir
(Repeat) Cuir glaoch orm b’fhéidir


I’m mostly popular (?)
between young and old
(Repeat) here’s my number
(Repeat) Please call me maybe

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Posted: 11 January 2017 08:59 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]  
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tóir is a pursuit/chase/hunt


so “I’m being chased” (all the time) = I’m popular

idir A agus B = both A and B

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Posted: 12 January 2017 07:18 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]  
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Thanks again!


D’fhán tú i bfhad leis an ádh
Thit mé gan chúis gan aon fáth
Ní raibh ort tada a rá
ach imeacht ar strae


You stay with luck?
I fell without cause, without reason
You did not having nothing to say
but the moment is lost?

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Posted: 12 January 2017 12:30 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]  
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You stayed lucky for a long time (at least I think that’s it - I’ve never heard this expression before)
I fell without cause without reason
You didn’t need to say anything
But go astray (get lost)

By the way, where are these from?  Are they all the same author?  Some of them sound a little weird to me.. like not totally wrong but a little awkward.

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