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A little help
Posted: 29 October 2016 05:26 PM   Ignore ]  
Comhalta
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Total Posts:  12
Joined  2013-09-05

This bit of grammar been at me for years, would like some help clarifying when to use which one.
Here is an example:
Atá tú
A bhfuil tú
What is the difference and when can you use which?

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Posted: 31 October 2016 03:15 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]  
Comhalta
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Total Posts:  182
Joined  2011-11-03
Séamas O’Conaill - 29 October 2016 05:26 PM

This bit of grammar been at me for years, would like some help clarifying when to use which one.
Here is an example:
Atá tú
A bhfuil tú
What is the difference and when can you use which?

Different relative clauses


X atá tú, direct relative clause,
X is subject or object of the relative clause (both impossible here. There’s no object of tá and it’s subject must be tú here.) or predicate of a cleft sentence
e.g. Is ag scríobh ata tú, Is ann atá tú 


X a bhfuil tú indirect relative clause.
A resumptive pronoun in the relative clause is referring back to the antecedent X ,
e.g. an sliabh a bhfuil tú air = the mountain on which you are, an file a bhfuil tú ag léamh a leabhair = the poet whose book you’re reading,
Or there’s an adverbial relation.
e.g. an áit a bhfuil tú = the place where you are

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Posted: 08 November 2016 04:48 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]  
Comhalta
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Joined  2011-10-27

In many cases, the use of “atá tú” or “a bhfuil tú” depends on the question word preceding it. For example, “conas” is followed by a direct relative clause (atá tú), whereas “cén chaoi” is followed by in indirect relative clause (a bhfuil tú). Which is why you get “conas atá tú”, but “cén chaoi a bhfuil tú”. The list could be extended, of course.

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Posted: 11 November 2016 04:41 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]  
Comhalta
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Joined  2012-04-22

Yes, I definitely recommend reading about the subject of direct relative vs. indirect relative, as it affects how the verb is treated regardless of whether it is a form of “bí”, the copula, or any other verb.

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