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Mnathan etymology
Posted: 19 May 2015 03:23 AM   Ignore ]  
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Anyone know what mnathan is derived from and how it relates to bean?

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Posted: 19 May 2015 05:42 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]  
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I’m aware the Irish equivialent of mnthan is mná but I presume same etymology.

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Posted: 19 May 2015 02:45 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]  
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charlie - 19 May 2015 03:23 AM

Anyone know what mnathan is derived from and how it relates to bean?


McBain’s Etymological Dictionary:

bean, wife, so Ir., O. Ir.  ben, W. bunbenyw, Cor. benen, sponsa, Celtic benâ, g. bnâs, pl. n. bnâs ; Gr. gyné, Bœot. Gr. baná, Got. ginô, Eng. queen, Sc. queyn, Skr. gnâ


Celtic benâ, genitive bnâs


benâ -> bean
bnâs -> mná


-than plural suffix.

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Posted: 19 May 2015 05:49 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]  
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Cheers
Is there any reason why no other words don’t work the same way (you’ll need to excuse my ignorance).

Is it cause it was so common a word it carried on through and survived other language changes.

Thanks again

Charlie

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Posted: 20 May 2015 04:33 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]  
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Labhrás - 19 May 2015 02:45 PM

benâ -> bean
bnâs -> mná


-than plural suffix.

Labhrás, would you happen to know if this is a purely Scottish Gaelic suffix or did the form “mnathan” at some point also exist in Irish Gaelic? I thought the plural form was “mná” already in Classical Old Irish…

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Posted: 20 May 2015 03:22 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]  
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Onuvanja - 20 May 2015 04:33 AM
Labhrás - 19 May 2015 02:45 PM

benâ -> bean
bnâs -> mná


-than plural suffix.

Labhrás, would you happen to know if this is a purely Scottish Gaelic suffix or did the form “mnathan” at some point also exist in Irish Gaelic? I thought the plural form was “mná” already in Classical Old Irish…


I don’t know if other plural forms of “bean” beside “mná” (/mna:/, /mra:/) exist or existed in Irish.
I guess the Irish equivalent for -an is -anna , The th in Scottish Gaelic -than is probably silent and due to the hiatus between mna- and -an .
-an is a frequent plural suffix in Gàidhlig, much more so than Irish -anna, so I’m not surprised about “mnathan”.

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Posted: 20 May 2015 03:30 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]  
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charlie - 19 May 2015 05:49 PM

Is it cause it was so common a word it carried on through and survived other language changes.

Yes, certainly.
Irregular forms are most common in the most frequent words. in every language.

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Posted: 20 May 2015 06:21 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]  
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Cheers, wiser,  a wee bit and a big bit wink

Beannacht dhuit

Charlie

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Posted: 21 May 2015 03:24 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]  
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Labhrás - 20 May 2015 03:22 PM
Onuvanja - 20 May 2015 04:33 AM
Labhrás - 19 May 2015 02:45 PM

benâ -> bean
bnâs -> mná


-than plural suffix.

Labhrás, would you happen to know if this is a purely Scottish Gaelic suffix or did the form “mnathan” at some point also exist in Irish Gaelic? I thought the plural form was “mná” already in Classical Old Irish…


I don’t know if other plural forms of “bean” beside “mná” (/mna:/, /mra:/) exist or existed in Irish.
I guess the Irish equivalent for -an is -anna , The th in Scottish Gaelic -than is probably silent and due to the hiatus between mna- and -an .
-an is a frequent plural suffix in Gàidhlig, much more so than Irish -anna, so I’m not surprised about “mnathan”.

Ah, that’s interesting! So technically, “mnathan” has two plular markers - the special plural stem “mna” plus the plural ending “-an”. smile

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