Daltai na Gaeilge
Username: Password:
Remember Me? forgot password?
   
 
Grammatical and phonetic terms
Posted: 06 May 2015 08:39 PM   Ignore ]  
Comhalta
Rank
Total Posts:  9
Joined  2013-08-19

Greetings to y’all,

One thing I’m noticing in reading the majority of these great posts is my grievous lack of knowledge in this area. I realize that many of these terms aren’t essential to learning Irish, but I’d like to be able to join in on the conversation. Might anyone know of a good resource online or off that does a good job of explaining such terms as “past subjunctive” and “future past tense objective”?

Many thanks

John

Profile
 
Posted: 06 May 2015 11:04 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]  
Comhalta
RankRank
Total Posts:  692
Joined  2012-04-22

A lot of the basic terms for parts of speech are used in An Foclóir Beag, which is an Irish dictionary in Irish.  [link]http://193.1.97.44/focloir/[/link]

The Nualeargais grammar site also has every section headed by both the Irish and English names for things.  [link]http://nualeargais.ie/gnag/gram.htm[/link]

That should pretty much cover you.

Profile
 
Posted: 07 May 2015 05:02 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]  
Comhalta
RankRank
Total Posts:  643
Joined  2011-10-26

I don’t even know what ““future past tense objective” could mean (and I’m a linguist). In what context have you read that?
Past subjunctive is “foshuiteach caite” in Irish. Actually it’s the name one gives to a form that has the same meaning as the conditional present, but that can only be used after particles like dá, go etc (ie. not alone).

Signature 

Is fearr Gaeilg chliste ná Gaeilg bhriste
Agus is í Gaeilg Ghaoth Dobhair is binne

Profile
 
Posted: 15 May 2015 12:21 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]  
Comhalta
Rank
Total Posts:  9
Joined  2013-08-19

Yes, well, sorry about that. I was quite exhausted when I wrote the post and couldn’t think of another grammatical term, so I kinda made one. My mother taught by example regarding “loss of words”. How can you be at a loss for words when there are so many around?

I am serious about my post however. I’m not really looking for Irish translations of grammatical terms, rather their practical meaning. At 59 I’m playing catch up with a lot of things. Grammatical terms are only one of them.

Many thanks,

John

Profile
 
Posted: 15 May 2015 05:19 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]  
Comhalta
RankRank
Total Posts:  692
Joined  2012-04-22

The second site I linked you to should have a pretty good practical meaning of most of the terms.  Whatever lesson material you are using should have some explanation of the grammar involved.  If you run into any terms of concepts you don’t understand, feel free to ask here.  There are too many terms/concepts for us to summarize and most of them should hopefully be clear as you progress through whatever you’re using as learning material, but I and other people here will be happy to help fill in the gaps if there’s something that doesn’t make sense to you.

Profile
 
Posted: 15 May 2015 06:29 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]  
Comhalta
Rank
Total Posts:  9
Joined  2013-08-19

Many thanks! I will take you up on your offer!  Have a great weekend!

Profile
 
Posted: 16 May 2015 07:17 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]  
Comhalta
Rank
Total Posts:  81
Joined  2011-11-09

Are you happy with the meaning of English grammatical terms?
Most people under 60 seem not to have done much grammar at school. In the late 1960s, schools in many English-speaking countries changed their emphasis to other aspects. Apologies if this isn’t your snag!


I always recommend buying a cheap basic English grammar to people learning a foreign language.
Not all the terms will arise in English, but many will - like subjunctive and objective etc

le dea-ghuí eadaoin

Profile