Daltai na Gaeilge
Username: Password:
Remember Me? forgot password?
   
 
Cén bhaint atá aige sin leis?
Posted: 05 May 2015 12:45 PM   Ignore ]  
Comhalta
Rank
Total Posts:  10
Joined  2015-01-13

I think this is an interesting sentence. I know it means “What has that got to do with you?”

But can it also mean:

“What connection do you have with yer man there?”.

In other words, can aige also refer to a man in this context? And if not, why not?

Can you say: “Cén bhaint atá aige leis?” for “What has it got to do with you?” and “What is your connection to him?”.

I’m also interested in this sentence:

“Níl aon mhaith le duine ar bith aige sin”  -  He thinks nobody is any good.

I can appreciate that aige here mean “according to himself” but what is the function of sin?

Thank you!

Profile
 
Posted: 05 May 2015 05:26 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]  
Comhalta
RankRank
Total Posts:  691
Joined  2012-04-22

I think this is an interesting sentence. I know it means “What has that got to do with you?”

No, it means what has it/he got to do with it/him?

But can it also mean:
“What connection do you have with yer man there?”.

No. 

Can you say: “Cén bhaint atá aige leis?” for “What has it got to do with you?” and “What is your connection to him?”

As with the others, you’re mixing up “leis”(with him/it) with “leat” (with you)

“Níl aon mhaith le duine ar bith aige sin”  -  He thinks nobody is any good.

To be honest, I don’t 100% understand this sentence myself.  I know it comes from Ó Donaill, so I am confident it’s right, but it’s an expression I haven’t seen before.  I can only assume that the prototype, so to speak, of the phrase is “maith a bheith ag duine le duine eile” (literally, for someone to ‘have good/ness’ with someone else) means to think highly of someone or to think they are any good.  “Níl aon mhaith .... ag an duine sin” = “that (the function of “sin”) person doesn’t have”, “aon mhaith le duine ar bith” = any good (here, meaning good opinion, I assume) with/for any person.  Using this formula, if you wanted to say “I don’t think anyone is any good”, you’d presumably say “Níl aon mhaith le duine ar bith agam”.  “The man doesn’t think the movie is any good” (assuming the idiom works for this type of thing) would be “Níl aon mhaith leis an scannán ag an bhfear”. 
But that’s partially speculation, like I say, because I’ve never heard that before.  Someone will probably correct me if I’m wrong.

I can appreciate that aige here mean “according to himself” but what is the function of sin?

No, “aige” means literally “at him”, combined with a form of “tá” in any form (i.e. “níl”, “an bhfuil” etc) means “he has”.  “Sin” is not directly in the translation they gave but it means “that”, i.e. that one there.  If you wanted to get slightly more literal, the translation should really read something like “That man/person/thing (it isn’t specified) thinks nobody is any good”.

Profile