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a couple o’ questions
Posted: 09 January 2012 08:32 PM   Ignore ]  
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1. Is there any difference between:

Tá sé uaim.
Teastaíonn sé uaim.
Tá sé ag teastáil uaim.

I know that they all mean “I want it” but I was wondering if there are times when you would use one of them instead of the other two - or are they pretty much interchangeable?

Also, are “I want …” and “I need …” said exactly the same way or is there a different way to say them?

2. I ran across these two sentences to-day:

An bhfuilir chun mise d’fhágaint anso?
D’iarr m’athair orm dul go dtí an siopa agus tobac d’fháil dó.

I understand what they mean, but I was wondering what the d’ is - does anybody know?

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Posted: 09 January 2012 10:25 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]  
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I have no answer for 1., so to your 2nd question

Wee_Falorie_Man - 09 January 2012 08:32 PM

2. I ran across these two sentences to-day:

An bhfuilir chun mise d’fhágaint anso?
D’iarr m’athair orm dul go dtí an siopa agus tobac d’fháil dó.

I understand what they mean, but I was wondering what the d’ is - does anybody know?

“a” between objects and verbal nouns is a shortened form of the preposition “do”
to make a thing: “rud do dhéanamh” => rud a dhéanamh
So, here “d’” in front of vowels or fh is exactly the same.
Munster Irish, obviously.

chun mise d’fhágaint anso = chun mise a fhágáil anseo
agus tobac d’fháil dó = agus tobac a fháil dó

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Posted: 09 January 2012 10:32 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]  
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A couple or triple o’ thoughts

1.
Tá sé uaim is probably an abbreviated version of Tá sé ag teastáil uaim, kinda like we all know ‘Morning’ as a greeting means ‘Good morning to you’ or May you have a good morning or It is a fine morning.

The Teastaíonn sounds more like it’s an ongoing need and the ag teastáil sounds more immediate.

2.
I need: Tá…uaim
I want: Ba mhaith liom…
I hope I’ll get: Tá mé ag iarraidh …(I’m trying/looking for it).

3. ‘Looks like the d’ is do and an alternative for a and I’ve seen it in texts usually in Munster Irish.
Just thinking out loud on this.

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Posted: 09 January 2012 11:23 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]  
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An bhfuilir chun mise d’fhágaint anso?
D’iarr m’athair orm dul go dtí an siopa agus tobac d’fháil dó.

Yes the dˈ is a shortened form of “do”, which is the same thing as “a” which is found in other dialects.

ɪn standard Irish you’d get “An bhfuil tú chun mise a fhágáil anseo?”
and
D’iarr m’athair orm dul go dtí an siopa agus tobac a fháil dó.

The standard, C and U “a” is a shortened form of “do” as well, but the “do” and “d’” are only used in parts of Munster now.
There’s another form of it in “a dh’”, that people sometimes use in Ulster before vowel sounds:

mise a dh’fhágáil anseo
tobaca a dh’fháilt dó

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Posted: 10 January 2012 04:49 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]  
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Lughaidh - 09 January 2012 11:23 PM

There’s another form of it in “a dh’”, that people sometimes use in Ulster before vowel sounds:

mise a dh’fhágáil anseo
tobaca a dh’fháilt dó

The same is true for Corca Dhuibhne Irish, i.e. a dh’ before vowel sounds, so:
“An bhfuilir chun mise a dh’fhágaint anso?”
“D’iarr m’athair orm dul go dtí an siopa agus tobac a dh’fháil dó” or even: “Do dh’iarr m’athair orm dul go dtí an siopa agus tobac a dh’fháil dó.”

(According to “Gaeilge Chorca Dhuibhne” Ó Sé)

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Posted: 10 January 2012 10:22 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]  
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Thanks for the help (in chronological order) Labhrás, Tuigim, Lughaidh, and Klisz.

So “Tá sé uaim” can mean “I want it” OR “I need it” - Aha!

A couple or triple o’ thoughts

Very cool lingo cool smile

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