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tà an obair déanta agam
Posted: 31 December 2011 08:04 AM   Ignore ]  
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Dia daoibh! I’m not quite sure about the translation of the above sentence. The work is actually done by me (I did it) or by somebody else (I have it done, I ordered somebody to do it)?

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Posted: 31 December 2011 08:35 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]  
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I have done the work.Or ,in Hiberno-English as spoken here in Cork - I have the work done.

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Posted: 31 December 2011 11:05 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]  
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thank you

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Posted: 31 December 2011 03:29 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]  
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I think it goes like this:

Do dheineas an obair. - I did the work.
Tá an obair déanta agam. - I have done the work.

An bhfuil an ceart agam??

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Posted: 31 December 2011 06:17 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]  
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Tà an ceart agat, ach ni féidir liom “do dheineas” a thuiscint. “do” is a verbal particle of the past tense, ok, but why “deineas” which I feel should be an impersonal form? Is it from a dialect or from old irish?

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Posted: 31 December 2011 08:31 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]  
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do dheineas = rinne mé
It’s Munster Irish

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Posted: 31 December 2011 09:16 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]  
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Yikes! I would have never guessed that “rinne mé” means the same thing as Do dheineas   ohh

I checked my big verb book and found:

do dheineas (Munster)

rinne mé/rinneas (Connaught)

rinn mé (Ulster)

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Posted: 01 January 2012 06:36 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]  
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Yes,we learnt rinne at school,even tho native speakers in Munster don’t use it.The verb is surely not irregular without ‘rinne’ ?

But we worked hard on the irregular verbs so it’skinda stuck in my head now!

Is this like saying ‘tá an bia ite agam’ as opposed to ‘d’ith me an bia’?

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Posted: 01 January 2012 11:03 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]  
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I’ve been learning Munster Irish on my own, and reading books and poems from native speakers in Kerry, Cork, and Waterford, so I almost never run across any “standard” Irish or Irish from other dialects.

You’re right, this verb does look very irregular in other dialects - according to my verb book:

Ar dheineas?  (Munster)

An ndearna mé? (Connaught)

An dtearn mé?  (Ulster)

Mario Berti said that I was right on the last one, so here’s how I would translate the sentences that you mentioned:

Tá an bia ite agam. - I have eaten the food.
D’itheas an bia. - I ate the food.

I’m hoping that we get a little input from some of the fluent speakers around here - Lughaidh, Aonghus, Jeaicín …

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Posted: 01 January 2012 01:57 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]  
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You’re right, this verb does look very irregular in other dialects - according to my verb book:

Ar dheineas?  (Munster)

An ndearna mé? (Connaught)

An dtearn mé?  (Ulster)

In parts of Munster I think they may say “an ndearnas” or sthg like that, otherwise “ar dheineas” or “an ndeineas” (I think).
Connachta : an ndearna mé or ar rinne mé.
Ulster: An dtearn mé or an dtearr mé...

Tá an bia ite agam. - I have eaten the food.
D’itheas an bia. - I ate the food.

I think you may use “D’itheas an bia” to say “I have eaten the food” too.
You can also say “tà mè i ndiaidh an bia a ithe”.

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Posted: 01 January 2012 02:06 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]  
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Thanks for helping us out with this stuff Lughaidh!

Is “Táim i ndiaidh an bia a ithe” like saying “Táim tar éis an bia a ithe”?

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Posted: 01 January 2012 02:42 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]  
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Yes, “tar éis +vn” is Munster and Connachta, and “i ndiaidh+vn” is Ulster, but they mean the same thing and are used in the same way.

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Posted: 01 January 2012 03:22 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]  
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d’fhoghlaim mé a lán inniu buíochas libh a cháirde (tá a lán foghlamtha agam anois)

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Posted: 02 January 2012 07:59 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]  
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Tá an leagan “Ní Rinne” ( Ní Rinní i gCondae Mhaigh Eo) cloiste agam in agallamh a rinne cainteoir dúchais as Inis Gé, meas sibh an botún a bhí ann, nó leagan canúnach?

Deirtear “In éis” comh maith in áit tar éis/in dhiaidh…..meascán eatarthu is dóigh liom!

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Posted: 02 January 2012 11:10 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]  
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Màs cainteoir dùchais (Gaeltachta) a d’ùrt é, caithfidh nach meancòg atà ann.
Ach is féidir gur “nìor rinne” a d’ùrt sé. Bheadh sè nìos aistì “nì rinne” (agus dà rèir sin, “nach rinne” srl) a ràidht, nà “nìor rinne (gur rinne, nàr rinne), a bheadh nìos nàdùrtha b’fhéidir.

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