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rince
Posted: 13 December 2011 10:35 AM   Ignore ]  
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Ages ago I posted about the word damhsa,which is of French origin.I wondered what the real English for dance might be since both English and Irish terms seemed to be French in reality.Back then I thought the real Irish word was rince.But Aonghus - I think- explained the word is actually Old Norse,the plot thickens.Recently a mate of mine drove through Rylane,County Cork and said it was as slippery as a skating rink.

Funny,as the name is Reileán na Rince as Gaeilge.Tis plenty cold in Norway,could rince have meant skating too back then?

PS they keep messing with the road signs.The one for Nadd used to read Nead an Iolar underneath.now tis just Nadd/Nead which just looks daft and leaves out the meaning.But back to the dance! Rince appears in placenames more often it seems to me.Damhsa is there in songs though,must be a fairly old borrowing.I’m only talking about Munster I must add.Any info re Connacht/Ulster gratefully received.

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Posted: 13 December 2011 12:59 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]  
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The borrowing from the French could have come during Norman rule. ??? Just a thought.

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Posted: 13 December 2011 04:40 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]  
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The French word is “danse” (pronounced [dɑ͂s] today). I think “rin(n)ce” is more a Munster word. In Ulster people say “damhsa” pronounced [dawsə].
In Scottish Gaelic the form is closer to the English word: dannsa.
I read in some book, that the Gaelic (and maybe all Celtic languages) have no native word to say “dance”, they all use loanwords.

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Posted: 13 December 2011 05:10 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]  
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I understood that the Irish word “rince” and the English words “rink” and “ring” are all connected. They all refer to the action of somehow going around in a ring, as in dancing, skating etc. So I reckon both “rince” and “damhsa” are loan words.

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Posted: 14 December 2011 02:34 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]  
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So,there is no word for ‘dance’ in Irish or English.Fair enough,although I’m a pretty good mover for my age,though I say so myself!

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Posted: 14 December 2011 04:49 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]  
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Well, damhsa and rince are Irish words, dance is an ENglish word, but they are all loanwords (Gaelicized and Anglicized, of course).

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Posted: 16 December 2011 06:48 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]  
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Skeheenarinky is actually my favourite placename.I just love the sound of it.Sceach is the hawthorn of course.So ‘Little Hawthorn Bush of the Dances’.

Presumably the said dances took place in May,when, in times gone by,girls would carry flowering branches of mayflower through the villages.This seems to be what is described in the song ‘Thugamar Fein an Samradh Linn’.All very magical,which is why Cromwell outllawed Maypole dancing in England.

But I’m only guessing,maybe I have it all wrong?

The song is special to me also;my grandad liked to sing and this is the only song he knew in Irish.

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