Daltai na Gaeilge
Username: Password:
Remember Me? forgot password?
   
1 of 2
1
Munster dialect
Posted: 14 March 2013 01:34 PM   Ignore ]  
Comhalta
Rank
Total Posts:  14
Joined  2013-01-02

Can anyone please tell me where I can find Munster lessons?
Go raibh maith agat ! grin

Profile
 
Posted: 14 March 2013 02:35 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]  
Comhalta
Avatar
RankRank
Total Posts:  279
Joined  2011-10-27

A good place to start learning Munster Irish is with Pimsleur.


Here’s a link:

http://www.amazon.com/Irish-Understand-Pimsleur-Language-Programs/dp/0743500156/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1363288404&sr=1-1&keywords=pimsleur+irish

 

When you’re done with Pimsleur, you can give GaelTalk a try.

 

Here’s a link:

http://www.gaeltalk.net/

 

Click on “Personal Focus”, then click on “Sample Lessons”. The first lesson is free so you can check it out and see if you like it.

You can also learn a lot of good Munster Irish from everything that’s posted from Cian Ó Lorcáin on the Gaelchultúr Teoranta channel.

 

Here’s a link to the first one of his sentences:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rP8rrQ2V-Qg

 


And of course, you’re gonna want a copy of the old “Teach Yourself Irish” by Myles Dillon and Donncha Ó Cróinín
This is the older version that was in print from 1961 to 1992. The new version was printed after 1992 and is in “standard” NOT Munster Irish. I recommend getting one of the older hardback editions because they are better made and are generally sold in better condition.

Good Luck!  smile

Profile
 
Posted: 14 March 2013 02:37 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]  
Comhalta
Rank
Total Posts:  14
Joined  2013-01-02

Thank you so much! I will look at these now.

Profile
 
Posted: 15 March 2013 07:45 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]  
Comhalta
Rank
Total Posts:  7
Joined  2011-11-04

Also, didn’t someone create a PDF or something like that of the old TYI by Dillon / Ó Cróinín ? I remember that (along with the sound files) being available free online a few years ago.

Profile
 
Posted: 15 March 2013 09:10 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]  
Comhalta
Rank
Total Posts:  14
Joined  2013-01-02

So you speak the Munster dialect? I’m afraid I’m not an advanced learner.
I’m more like a beginner ...a complete beginner ....I’m talking I’m not even sure how to say ” Hello” beginner wink
I speak a little of the Ulster dialect but not enough to brag about lol

Profile
 
Posted: 15 March 2013 10:04 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]  
Comhalta
Rank
Total Posts:  14
Joined  2013-01-02

I agree about the money part. And you have been a great help to me and I appreciate it very much!
One of the things I love about the Munster dialect is the way it has the ” v ” sound instead of the ” w “
sound.  I think it makes the word sound nicer. Such as ” abhaile” and ” bhfuil ” .
There are some lessons on The Irish People’s Page where they use the v sound but I don’t know which
dialect it is.

Profile
 
Posted: 15 March 2013 10:43 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]  
Comhalta
Rank
Total Posts:  14
Joined  2013-01-02

I didn’t know that! In the Irish People’s lessons that I mentioned earlier has vw for bh followed by broad vowels.
Example ...Cá bhfuil tú....is pronounced ...kaw vwil too.
Is that sort of like Munster?
Also, instead of Cad é mar atá tú....how are you ...it teaches…Conas atá tú. It also says that native speakers
usually drop the first ” a ” so it would be said….Conas (a)tá tú.

Profile
 
Posted: 15 March 2013 10:44 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]  
Comhalta
Avatar
RankRank
Total Posts:  279
Joined  2011-10-27

How reliable are the sources you quote? The reason I ask is that there is a lot of dodgy stuff doing the rounds claiming to be Munster Irish from people who are not native speakers.

Pimsleur Irish is authentic Munster Irish with 2 native Irish speakers – one from the Cork Gaeltacht and one from the Kerry Gaeltacht. Their pronunciations are perfect but when I was first learning Irish, I was a little confused by their slightly different accents. The only bad thing about Pimsleur is that they only give you 8 lessons, so just when you’re starting to catch on to the language, the lessons end.

One thing that I forgot to mention: There is nothing written down in Pimsleur Irish, so you will not learn any reading or spelling. The great thing about Pimsleur is that it forces you to start actually speaking the language right away.

 

Here is a link to the transcript, for anybody who decides to learn from Pimsleur:

 

http://www.gaeilge.org/pimsleurtranscript.html

Profile
 
Posted: 15 March 2013 10:48 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]  
Comhalta
Avatar
RankRank
Total Posts:  279
Joined  2011-10-27

I didn’t know that! In the Irish People’s lessons that I mentioned earlier has vw for bh followed by broad vowels.
Example ...Cá bhfuil tú....is pronounced ...kaw vwil too.
Is that sort of like Munster?
Also, instead of Cad é mar atá tú....how are you ...it teaches…Conas atá tú. It also says that native speakers
usually drop the first ” a ” so it would be said….Conas (a)tá tú.

In good Munster Irish:


Cá bhfuileann tú? – Where are you?


Conas tánn tú? or Conas taoi? – How are you? (singular)

 

Conas tánn sibh? – How are you all? (plural)


The Irish People version of Irish is a curious mix of the different dialects with lots of “standard” thrown in.  confused

Profile
 
Posted: 15 March 2013 11:05 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]  
Comhalta
Avatar
RankRank
Total Posts:  279
Joined  2011-10-27
Carmanach - 15 March 2013 08:45 AM

How reliable are the sources you quote? The reason I ask is that there is a lot of dodgy stuff doing the rounds claiming to be Munster Irish from people who are not native speakers.

GaelTalk’s grammar lessons are in Munster Irish but they also teach you some “standard”. Their pronunciation is sometimes dodgy (and occasionally wrong!) but you can still get a fairly good idea of Munster grammar and pronunciation from the lessons in GaelTalk. I mentioned GaelTalk because the first lesson is free and I really got a lot out of it when I was first learning Munster Irish.

Cian Ó Lorcáin (on YouTube) is not perfect, but about 99% of his posts are in perfect Munster Irish.

 

Which reminds me – you can also find correct pronunciations in Munster Irish from Conchúr on Forvo. Here’s the link:


http://www.forvo.com/user/Conchur/


And the great Carmanach himself! Here’s the link:


http://www.forvo.com/user/Carmanach/

Profile
 
Posted: 15 March 2013 11:17 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]  
Comhalta
Rank
Total Posts:  14
Joined  2013-01-02

Oh I see. Thank you!

Profile
 
Posted: 15 March 2013 11:38 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]  
Comhalta
Avatar
RankRank
Total Posts:  279
Joined  2011-10-27
Carmanach - 15 March 2013 08:45 AM

How reliable are the sources you quote? The reason I ask is that there is a lot of dodgy stuff doing the rounds claiming to be Munster Irish from people who are not native speakers.

The original “Teach Yourself Irish” teaches authentic Munster Irish from the Cork Gaeltacht. The pronunciation on the sound files is virtually perfect and uses fluent native speakers. There are only 161 pages of lessons in Teach Yourself Irish, so there is a lot of information crammed into a small amount of pages. It’s a very hard book to learn from, but you will be utterly fluent if you can learn everything in this book.

Profile
 
Posted: 15 March 2013 11:55 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]  
Comhalta
Rank
Total Posts:  14
Joined  2013-01-02

It may be worth a try though grin

Profile
 
Posted: 15 March 2013 12:01 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]  
Comhalta
Avatar
RankRank
Total Posts:  279
Joined  2011-10-27
Deb - 15 March 2013 11:55 AM

It may be worth a try though grin

Yeah, it’s definitely worth it if you want to learn Irish like a fluent native speaker.  cheese

Profile
 
Posted: 16 March 2013 01:46 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]  
Comhalta
Rank
Total Posts:  14
Joined  2013-01-02

I was just thinking, I think I have the book..Teach Yourself Irish!
I’m going to look for it today. grin

Profile
 
Posted: 17 March 2013 08:34 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]  
Comhalta
Rank
Total Posts:  7
Joined  2011-11-04

If you’re unable to find it, here’s a link to it. It looks like you can either view it online or download it as a PDF.

http://archive.org/details/TeachYourselfIrish

Profile
 
   
1 of 2
1
 
‹‹ Suimiúil...      Gaeilge ››