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Can anyone help with these grammer questions?
Posted: 13 November 2011 01:43 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]  
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Well, after “An fada” you would definitely use “a” not “go” - For example:

An fada a bhís ag obair inné?

You also use “a” after a question word like “Cathain”:

Cathain a bhíonn tú ann?

hmm ... I can’t think of another question that is followed by “go” except for “Cad ‘na thaobh”. I’m hoping that maybe Lughaidh can help out with this (hint, hint)

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Posted: 13 November 2011 01:49 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]  
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I think you might be right, I can’t think of any others either except maybe cén t-am.

I used to translate literally… ‘go’ meaning ‘that’ (which in some cases it does)

Dúirt sí go raibh sé ann….she said that he was there

so I figured that it actually made sense to say, cén fáth/cad ina thaobh go raibh tú ann…why is it that you were there.

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Posted: 13 November 2011 02:25 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]  
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Cad ‘na thaobh go rabhais ann? - Why is it that you were there?

You’re right, it often makes sense to think of “go” as “that”.

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Posted: 14 November 2011 03:53 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]  
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I think in Munster Irish, you would use “a” (or “do”) in direct relative clauses and “go” in indirect relative clauses.

So your choice would depend on the particular question word, e.g. “conas” takes direct relative, therefore you would have something like “Conas (a)tánn tú?” On the other hand, “can ina thaobh” takes indirect relative, therefore you would have “Cad ina thaobh go fuileann tú anso?” (sorry, if my examples contain mistakes, as I’m not that familiar with Munster Irish).

In his “Modern Irish”, Mícheál O Siadhail gives a list of question words, indicating whether they take direct or indirect relative in a certain dialect. You can consult it on google.books (scroll to page 318): http://books.google.com/books?id=QUlGDUBmB50C&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f;=false

However, he also adds that there is a tendency for indirect relative to be replaced by direct relative in Munster…

Perhaps other members who are well-versed in Munster Irish can provide more information on this?

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Posted: 14 November 2011 10:12 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]  
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The Standard—imho—does not recommend particular forms of expression.  Cén fáth and Cad ina thaobh are both perfectly acceptable.  If you were to write “canathaobh” however your “standard check program”—if there were such and there is not—would suggest you use “cad ina thaobh” instead.  You are quite free to use your grannie’s strange expressions never recorded yet in any dictionary or grammar.  If the language is alive and being used there are new expressions being coined daily.  The standard is a guide. Níl teir ná toirmeasc ar cheartfhoirmeacha eile.  If Irish is dead and frozen in aspic that is another matter.

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Posted: 17 November 2011 04:25 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]  
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In Munster Irish, I have also heard ‘Cad as duit’ and ‘Cad as tú’? for ‘where are you’?


Funilly enough, the only response I have ever heard is ’ is as ...... mé’

I have never heard ‘is as ....DOM’

even in response to ‘Cad as DUIT’

Any thoughts?

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Posted: 17 November 2011 04:40 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]  
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“Is as X dom(h)” does exist though (I was taught it in the university and my teacher wasn’t the kind if man who teaches nonsense), but I don’t know where. Maybe in Ulster?

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Posted: 17 November 2011 04:45 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]  
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I was taught:

“Cad as duit?” or “Cad as thú?”

Is ó Alburquerque mé.
or
Is as Alburquerque mé.

“Is as Alburquerque DOM” sounds right but I wasn’t taught to say it that way.

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Posted: 17 November 2011 04:50 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]  
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When I spent time in Corca Dhuibhne, I also learned ‘Is ó Phort Láirge mé’ agus ’ Is as Pórt Láirge mé’ in response to ‘Cad as duit’

Although I never heard ( either back then or since) ‘Is as Port Láirge DOM’, it would seem to me to be correct.

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Posted: 17 November 2011 05:35 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 25 ]  
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Make me wonder… since you often use ó in Munster to say where something/someone comes from, why don’t you ask “Cad uaidh tú” instead of “Cad as tú/duit” ? smile

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Posted: 17 November 2011 05:39 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 26 ]  
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It’s a Munster thing!

I wouldn’t expect you to understand! tongue wink

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Posted: 17 November 2011 05:43 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 27 ]  
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LOL  LOL  LOL  LOL  LOL  LOL

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Posted: 17 November 2011 07:25 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 28 ]  
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Not quite relevant but in Árainn long ago I asked a youngster “Cé leis thú” and was surprised to get the reply “Leis an teach sin.”  Given that the old naming system in the Gaeltacht celebrates three if not more generations I expected “Jimmy Nóra John” to which I would reply “Cén t-ainm atá ort féin?” expecting “Pat” or some such. Jimmy being the father’s name, Nóra the grandmother’s, and John the great-grandfather.  Only a social-welfare spy would ask for “An tUasal Ó Flaithbheartaigh.”

Regarding “Where are you from?” I heard “Cé as ab as tus’” in Erris.

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