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Try to do it
Posted: 02 September 2018 05:42 AM   Ignore ]  
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Dia Dhaoibh!
How to say “he tries to do it” in Irish?
I tried to translate, ach tá móran botún agam:
Deineann sé iarracht é a dhéanamh.
Chíonn sé le hé a dhéanamh.
Triaileann sé é a dhéanamh.
How say it irish people usually?
Is correct this variant:
“Baineann sé triail as….é a dhéanamh”?

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Posted: 04 September 2018 06:43 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]  
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I think using some form of “déan” is actually redundant in some of these cases.  You can just say “Baineann sé triail as”, mar shampla.  The “doing” is implicit here.  Even in English you can say “give it a try”, you don’t need to say “give doing it a try”.

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Posted: 04 September 2018 09:59 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]  
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I agree. Indeed, “Baineann sé triail as” is the first thing that springs to mind. “Déanann sé iarracht é a dhéanamh” and “Triaileann sé é a dhéanamh” are both grammatically correct, but “Tugann sé iarraidh air/faoi” or “tugann sé faoi” would sound more natural. “Chíonn sé le hé a dhéanamh” doesn’t sound correct to me. “Le” and “é” usually give “lena” when standing next to each other.

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Posted: 04 September 2018 10:19 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]  
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In Connacht, féachann sé lena dhéanamh would be a valid way of saying it. See:
https://www.teanglann.ie/en/fgb/féach_le

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Posted: 04 September 2018 12:38 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]  
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Thanks to You All!
If i want to say: “i try to find a job”, can i say:
“Bainim triail as post a fháil” ?

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Posted: 04 September 2018 02:31 PM   Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]  
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For that I’d say something like “Táim ag lorg poist”, or “táim ag iarraidh post a fháil.” 

Keep in mind that when translating, you should really seek to boil down the essence of the *meaning* you’re trying to convey and not attempt to do things word for word.  This is actually challenging, but it’s generally a skill that’s very much worth cultivating.  In other words, not all statements that begin in English with “I’m trying” or “I try” will begin the same way in Irish (or any other language for that matter).

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Posted: 12 September 2018 10:02 AM   Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]  
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Onuvanja - 04 September 2018 09:59 AM

“Chíonn sé le hé a dhéanamh” doesn’t sound correct to me. “Le” and “é” usually give “lena” when standing next to each other.

I don’t know for chíonn + le (rather féachann + le)


but:


le hé a dhéanamh (“in order to do it”) is correct Standard and Ulster Irish. 
In Connacht len é a dhéanamh (le n-é)  or le é a dhéanamh (le é > l’é) can be heard.
In Munster it is rather chun é a dhéanamh.


Of course, lena dhéanamh (chun a dhéanta) is an alternative version.

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