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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 2005- » 2007 (November-December) » Archive through November 07, 2007 » Word network search: helpful for bi-lingual translation? « Previous Next »

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brn (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 159.134.221.221
Posted on Saturday, October 27, 2007 - 02:47 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

http://www.aimsigh.com/lsg/

This may help those who are translating as it links words in a 'semantic web'

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brn (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 86.43.126.166
Posted on Sunday, October 28, 2007 - 01:10 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

http://borel.slu.edu/fleiscin/mile.html

top 1000, as per corpus checking. Not perfect as one has function words in it, but might be useful to some

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brn (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 159.134.221.99
Posted on Monday, October 29, 2007 - 07:03 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

One can check down the top 1000 and then check how words relate to one another on aimsigh which produces a clickable web of words, where proximity is a measure of similarity.

For example, if one wants to find out about 'láthair' type it into aimsigh:
http://www.aimsigh.com/cgi-bin/lsg.cgi?ionchur=l%C3%A1thair&foirm=Aimsigh+%C3%A9 &coras=Win32

And one sees what it is linked to. One can check new words on http://www.englishirishdictionary.com/home to see how they are used in phrases.

If you want to get a deeper sense of usage, say by going for collocations and derived prepositions, one can go to http://borel.slu.edu/corpas/index.html and type in láthair (sorry, it does not auto link) and one get these forms:

i láthair
fé láthair
as láthair
ina láthair

Put them back into http://www.englishirishdictionary.com/home and now the usages of the phrase comes up

Put 'i láthair' back into the semantic web of aimsigh http://www.aimsigh.com/cgi-bin/lsg.cgi?ionchur=i+l%C3%A1thair&foirm=Aimsigh+%C3% A9&coras=Win32

and more connexions are created. This helps give one a richer sense of the words and usage.

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brn (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 159.134.221.30
Posted on Monday, October 29, 2007 - 10:35 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

http://www.potafocal.com/Search.aspx?Text=i+l%C3%A1thair

cross checking in the above is useful too

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brn (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 159.134.221.30
Posted on Monday, October 29, 2007 - 10:46 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post


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Abigail
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Username: Abigail

Post Number: 579
Registered: 06-2006


Posted on Monday, October 29, 2007 - 10:53 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Or you could do like I do and read FGB on your lunch break, with special attention to any word that takes up over half a column.

Tá fáilte roimh chuile cheartú!

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Fearn
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Username: Fearn

Post Number: 639
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Monday, October 29, 2007 - 11:01 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Chuireann sé sin caint Mháirtín uí Chadhain i gcuimhne dom, gur cheart do gach duine ar mhór aige an Ghaeilge dul a luí gach oíche le Ó Duinnín .i. an foclóir seachas an sagart.

Dar ndóigh, bhí sin sa ré roimh Ó Donaill, ríomhairí is idirlíon ;-)

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Abigail
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Username: Abigail

Post Number: 580
Registered: 06-2006


Posted on Monday, October 29, 2007 - 11:30 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Nárbh fhíor dó! Agus b'fhearr liom i bhfad Duinnín mar fhoclóir leapa... níl sé chomh fuarchúiseach cliniciúil is atá an Dónallach. (An foclóir arís atá i gceist agam, ar eagla na míthuisceana.)

Ach is nós é seo ar chuir mé tús leis sula bhfuair mé cóip d'fhoclóir an Duinnínigh, agus sula mbeinn in ann an seanchló a léamh dá bhfaighinn.

Tá fáilte roimh chuile cheartú!

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Fearn
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Username: Fearn

Post Number: 640
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Monday, October 29, 2007 - 11:38 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Molaim do chleacht!

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Mbm
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Username: Mbm

Post Number: 181
Registered: 01-2006


Posted on Tuesday, October 30, 2007 - 11:46 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Is fearr liomsa foclóir a bheith fuarchúiseach cliniciúil. Is saothar tagartha é foclóir, tar éis an tsaoil, ní saothar ficsin.

Feictear dom uaireanta gur giorra do shaothar ficsin atá Foclóir Uí Dhónaill, áfach. Insíonn sé bréaga anois is arís. Tá frásaí agus patrúin in Ó Dónall nach bhfuil in úsáid níos mó (má bhí riamh) agus nach bhfuil aon fhianaise dóibh sa chorpas. Ní treoir mhaith é Foclóir Uí Dhónaill don té atá ag iarraidh an Ghaeilge chomhaimseartha a thabhairt leis.

Sin é mo thuairim, pé scéal é.

Mo bhlag sa seanchló Gaelach:
www.cainteoir.com

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brn (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 159.134.221.136
Posted on Tuesday, October 30, 2007 - 12:08 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

I see such resources as been a valuable part of any serious revival as corpus linguistics is proving to be a very valuable tool, and is only improving all the time. It is my goal to work out a model of language that can provide the basis for logical teaching practices. People are always interested in how many words are needed to be fluent. Corpus based approaches remind us that languages are systems not objects, thus collocations, colligations and simply put, what is 'string-legal', out-weigh in importance words simply on their own

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 6376
Registered: 08-2004


Posted on Tuesday, October 30, 2007 - 12:20 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post


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brn (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 159.134.220.90
Posted on Tuesday, October 30, 2007 - 03:32 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Ceannaigh mé é. Leabhar go maith.

I forgot to point out that such programs are listed above are rather nascent at the moment, but the might come into their own in a more developed, user friendly incarnation in time.

The semantic web (aimsigh) would be interesting to test if it were bi-lingual for the purposes of drawing out the implicit understanding we have of structure, cross-culturally. For example, I was able to go from carr (rough/uneven ground) to bogach (with portach nearby) to criathrach to ceachrach to lodar (soft fleshy person).

It would be interesting (to me at least) to see how much hints and navigation alone could begin the process of improving vocabulary. Thinking of the phrase 'Micí ar an bPortach' alone helped me keep context in mind, and now even Lodar and súmaire are in my head easy. This may not seem clear from reading about it; its a rather implicit process. I'm not one to believe in learning gimmicks, but I found it worthy of mention at least



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