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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 2005- » 2007 (March-April) » Archive through April 21, 2007 » "Go" as Gaeilge « Previous Next »

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Domhnall_Ó_h_aireachtaigh
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Username: Domhnall_Ó_h_aireachtaigh

Post Number: 149
Registered: 09-2006
Posted on Thursday, April 05, 2007 - 02:16 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Apologies if this has been covered before.

"To go." Is there a standard explanation of when to prefer one of these over another.

téigh
gabh
imigh
tabhair

(Also, I thought the last meant "give," but perhaps this is a feature of Irish I'm not familiar with.)

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Lughaidh
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Username: Lughaidh

Post Number: 1595
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Thursday, April 05, 2007 - 05:40 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

There's a difference between them:

téigh = gabh = go (somewhere). Gabh is used in Donegal and in Connemara. I don't know where "téigh" is used: according to my books about dialects, it isn't used in Donegal, nor in Connemara, nor in Kerry...

imigh = go away

tabhair = give, I don't know why it is in your list.

Learn Irish pronunciation here: www.phouka.com/gaelic/sounds/sounds.htm

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(Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 84.64.184.231
Posted on Thursday, April 05, 2007 - 06:10 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

'Thug mé Meiriceá orm féin', means i went to America. It only takes on the 'go' meaning when it is used with a réamhfhocal(preposition)

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Mac_léinn
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Username: Mac_léinn

Post Number: 411
Registered: 01-2007


Posted on Thursday, April 05, 2007 - 08:00 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

I don't know where "téigh" is used: according to my books about dialects, it isn't used in Donegal, nor in Connemara, nor in Kerry...

Ó Dónaill's Foclóir Gaeilge Bearla contains nearly four pages describing the use of the word téigh, so I would be surprised if the word doesn't have it's place in the parlance of native Irish speakers.

'Thug mé Meiriceá orm féin', means i went to America.

Tabhair can also mean take, bring, out of as in Thug mé as Albain iad I brought them from Scotland.

Fáilte Roimh Ceartúcháin - Go Raibh Maith Agaibh
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/teachyourselfirish
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/irishlinguistics

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Domhnall
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Username: Domhnall

Post Number: 929
Registered: 06-2005


Posted on Thursday, April 05, 2007 - 08:03 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Téigh would be caighdeán i'd say..

A people without a language of its own is only half a nation.A nation should guard its language more than its territories, 'tis a surer barrier and a more important frontier than mountain or river

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(Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 83.147.191.60
Posted on Thursday, April 05, 2007 - 09:38 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Dúirt Lughaidh,
"according to my books about dialects"
An mbeadh sé de dhánacht orm ceist a chur ort ainmneacha na leabhar seo?
GRMA.

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Lughaidh
Member
Username: Lughaidh

Post Number: 1596
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Thursday, April 05, 2007 - 12:58 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Duine gan ainm > An Teanga Bheo: Conamara, Corca Dhuibhne...

Domhnall > ok, but caighdeán is just a mix of the other dialects. There aren’t things in caighdeán that don’t exist anywhere in the Gaeltacht... (hopefully!)

Learn Irish pronunciation here: www.phouka.com/gaelic/sounds/sounds.htm

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Riona
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Username: Riona

Post Number: 1096
Registered: 01-2006


Posted on Thursday, April 05, 2007 - 07:43 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

What about ag dul for going?

Beir bua agus beannacht

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(Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 71.112.204.43
Posted on Thursday, April 05, 2007 - 09:14 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Actually, yes... for which verb is "ag dul" the verbal noun?

God I need more resources. Oof.

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Méabh
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Username: Méabh

Post Number: 36
Registered: 02-2005


Posted on Friday, April 06, 2007 - 11:05 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

"ag dul" is the verbal noun of téigh

téigh abhaile = go home
tá mé ag dul abhaile

(Message edited by méabh on April 06, 2007)

(Message edited by méabh on April 06, 2007)

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Fear_na_mbróg
Member
Username: Fear_na_mbróg

Post Number: 1466
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Friday, April 06, 2007 - 11:47 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

I myself use "téigh" and "imigh", but in different contexts. I don't use "gabh"; that's more of a Northern thing as far as I know. As for "tabhair"... must be some sort of idiom you're talking about sort of like English's "let's hit the road".

I use "imigh" when the person is going off somewhere, e.g.:

He went off to America -- D'imigh sé go Meiriceá

and I use "téigh" for every other usage. "imigh" is like a "téigh" injected with a wreckless abandon, as in "I'm going, you can't reach me by phone or mail, and I'll be home in 6 months", as in "He went off to war".

-- Fáilte Roimh Cheartú --
Mura mbíonn téarma Gaeilge agaibh ar rud éigin, bígí cruthaitheach! Ná téigí i muinín focail Bhéarla a úsáid, údar truaillithe é sin dod chuid cainte.

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Domhnall_Ó_h_aireachtaigh
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Username: Domhnall_Ó_h_aireachtaigh

Post Number: 150
Registered: 09-2006
Posted on Saturday, April 07, 2007 - 01:46 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Thank you! The difference between "téigh" and "imigh" is clear now.

For the record, however, the work "gabh" continues to intrigues me, as it would seem to sound like "go," as Bearla.

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Domhnall
Member
Username: Domhnall

Post Number: 932
Registered: 06-2005


Posted on Saturday, April 07, 2007 - 05:31 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

I posted a thread before Domhnall on "Gabh" i thought people were being lazy and just using the English "Go" but from experience it is the most used verb for "To go" in Belfast and all of Ulster..

"Gabh ar aghaidh" -> Go ahead...

A people without a language of its own is only half a nation.A nation should guard its language more than its territories, 'tis a surer barrier and a more important frontier than mountain or river

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Lughaidh
Member
Username: Lughaidh

Post Number: 1597
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Saturday, April 07, 2007 - 02:21 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

As I said before, "gabh" is also used in Connemara Irish: it isn't a typical Ulster form.

Learn Irish pronunciation here: www.phouka.com/gaelic/sounds/sounds.htm

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Mac_léinn
Member
Username: Mac_léinn

Post Number: 412
Registered: 01-2007


Posted on Saturday, April 07, 2007 - 04:31 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Scríobh Fear na mBrog: I don't use "gabh";

Dáiríre píre? Ceard faoi gabh mo leithscéal?

I suppose gabh used in the context of take as in excuse me may be universal used amongst the dialects?

I find it slightly amusing that when I first started visting this forum about 5 or 6 years ago, I was told point-blank that gabh and its variant verbal noun "goil" was not found in writing and literature in general and that the "correct" form for go was "teigh." It's good to see "gabh" getting the respect in deserves in this thread.

Happy Easter!

Fáilte Roimh Ceartúcháin - Go Raibh Maith Agaibh
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/teachyourselfirish
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/irishlinguistics

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Fear_na_mbróg
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Username: Fear_na_mbróg

Post Number: 1467
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Saturday, April 07, 2007 - 05:18 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

I don't use "gabh" to mean "go".

-- Fáilte Roimh Cheartú --
Mura mbíonn téarma Gaeilge agaibh ar rud éigin, bígí cruthaitheach! Ná téigí i muinín focail Bhéarla a úsáid, údar truaillithe é sin dod chuid cainte.

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Mac_léinn
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Username: Mac_léinn

Post Number: 413
Registered: 01-2007


Posted on Saturday, April 07, 2007 - 06:51 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

A Fhear na mBrog, tuigim, gabh mo leithscéal.

Fáilte Roimh Ceartúcháin - Go Raibh Maith Agaibh
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/teachyourselfirish
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/irishlinguistics

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Suaimhneas
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Username: Suaimhneas

Post Number: 257
Registered: 08-2006
Posted on Wednesday, April 11, 2007 - 06:03 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

quote:

As I said before, "gabh" is also used in Connemara Irish: it isn't a typical Ulster form.



TG4 did a "reality TV" show last year where "celebs" were locaked away for a week to learn Irish. I recall Breandan de Gallai who is a native speaker from Gaoth Dobhair always used the word Gabh for Go

Anybody of my generation (primary school in Ireland in the early 60s) will well remember the teacher's instruction to "teigh a choladh" whenever the teacher want a moment's peace. It was my favourite subject!

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BRN (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 159.134.221.224
Posted on Wednesday, April 11, 2007 - 06:09 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

I remember that!

And 'tá Mamaí ag cócaireacht, cócaireact etc while you had to spin around your little arms pretending to stir dough

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FRV (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 87.198.196.90
Posted on Saturday, April 14, 2007 - 04:28 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

is 'gabh' pronounced 'gau' or 'gó' (probably latter in Donegal)

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Lughaidh
Member
Username: Lughaidh

Post Number: 1610
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Saturday, April 14, 2007 - 06:56 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Yes, gabh is [gˠo] in Donegal (short o).

Learn Irish pronunciation here: www.phouka.com/gaelic/sounds/sounds.htm



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