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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 2005- » 2006 (September-October) » Archive through September 24, 2006 » Poor use of Irish in Place/house names etc « Previous Next »

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Mickrua
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Username: Mickrua

Post Number: 64
Registered: 07-2005
Posted on Tuesday, August 08, 2006 - 10:32 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Spotted this on a flagstone at the gate of a prominent local person in Milltown ,Co .Galway on the Dunmore/Garafrauns road. Lis na bin. An fiú dom é/í a cheartú agus a rá leo gur déanamh amadáin dóibh nuair a d'íoc siad ar an leac ainmne seo i mballa geata an tí.B'fhéidir nach bhfeiceann siad gur truailliú na teanga é seo in áit rud nua-aoise
"hip " i nGaeilge a chur ar an mbealach isteach chun an tí.

(Message edited by mickrua on August 08, 2006)

(Message edited by mickrua on August 08, 2006)

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Dennis
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Username: Dennis

Post Number: 1707
Registered: 02-2005


Posted on Tuesday, August 08, 2006 - 12:42 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

quote:

Lis na bin.

Bin? = Bosca bruscair?
quote:

An fiú dom é/í a cheartú...?

Ba chóir duit an leac sin a aoradh, mar a dhéanadh na filí anallód! ;-)

(Message edited by dennis on August 08, 2006)

Go raibh [do rogha meafar] leat!

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steph mcdowall (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 85.210.99.16
Posted on Monday, August 14, 2006 - 03:42 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

We would like to name our new house Many blessings, am I correct in thinking that it would be Beannachtai Mor?

Is there anything shorter/tidier we could use ?

Many thanks!

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Dennis
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Username: Dennis

Post Number: 1725
Registered: 02-2005


Posted on Monday, August 14, 2006 - 04:19 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Beannachtaí Móra = Big Blessings (the adj. has to agree in number with the plural noun)

Anything with "beannacht" is going to be a mouthful:

Beannachtaí Iomadúla = numerous/diverse blessings

Ilbheannachtaí = many/varied blessings (a compound with the prefix "il-")

Something snappier:

Teach Séanta = a charmed/blessed house (But then, depending where you are, you might have people asking "Teach Santa (Claus) what?"

Go raibh [do rogha meafar] leat!

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 3633
Registered: 08-2004


Posted on Monday, August 14, 2006 - 05:00 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Perhaps:

Míle Beannacht

(A Thousand blessings, but often used for "many")

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Taidhgín
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Username: Taidhgín

Post Number: 16
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Tuesday, August 15, 2006 - 07:40 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Is dána an mhaise dom é agus b'fhearra dhom gan é a lua ach .... samhlaítear dom gurb ionann "teach séanta" agus "a denied house" / "a rejected house". I know I shouldn't say it since the dictionary doesn't but I thought "teach séanta" meant "a rejected house" when I saw it first. "Séan" is a verb meaning "deny". Then I looked up "séanta" and found it has other meanings but dare I suggest the word "archaic" in relation to any Irish word? I never heard "séanta" used in any context. I never saw it written. "Séan" yes: "Guímid rath agus séan ort" "We wish you good fortune and happiness". But I'm no expert ... and less of a scholar ... (Thought: could the scholars be wrong? No! Perish that!) "Séanta" must have been used at some time if it is in Ó Dónaill. I'm sure I'm going to be enlightened. :-)

Incidentally what is "Lis na Bin" supposed to mean?

I like "Míle Beannacht" for "Many Blessings".

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Dennis
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Username: Dennis

Post Number: 1727
Registered: 02-2005


Posted on Tuesday, August 15, 2006 - 10:27 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

quote:

"Séanta" must have been used at some time if it is in Ó Dónaill.

Is fíor duit, a Thaidhgín, is focal "liteartha" anois é, cé go bhfuil sé beo bríomhar fós sna sean-téacsanna, áit a gcaithim a lán ama! Tá altanna sách fada in DIL faoi "sénaid" (an briathar), "sénad" (an t-ainm briathartha) agus "sénta" (an aidiacht bhriathartha) = "charmed, lucky, blessed". Seo cúpla sampla:

an slúag sénta so-ullamh

an phroinn-se de phlúr shéanta

go rug bean isan Bheithil / an t-eo séanta...


The three verbal forms I mentioned above are naturally all derived from the noun "séan", from Old Irish "sén", from Latin "signum". It has a fairly encompassing semantic range: sign, omen; incantation, charm; favorable sign, blessing; success, happiness. The verb "sénaid" often was used to mean "sign with the cross, bless".

Is focal é a bhfuil sean-aithne agam air, focal nár mhaith liom a chailleadh. GRMA as an cheist a chur: thug tú deis dom beagán a rá faoi! :-)

Go raibh [do rogha meafar] leat!

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Taidhgín
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Username: Taidhgín

Post Number: 17
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Wednesday, August 16, 2006 - 03:50 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Go raibh maith agat, Dennis. Is breá liom do léann is do fhoighne. Murach do leithéid cá bhfaigheadh Gaeilgeoir maoilscríbeach mar mise eolas ar a leithéid.

Thanks for that Dennis. I admire and respect your knowledge and patience. Ordinary Irish-speakers like me need scholars like you. And the wonder of the Internet is that we get to meet on neutral ground outside the Groves of Academe.

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Dennis
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Username: Dennis

Post Number: 1745
Registered: 02-2005


Posted on Friday, August 18, 2006 - 05:18 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Signage mishaps befall our sister language (An Bhreatnais atá mé a rá), too. This one is a scream!

http://itre.cis.upenn.edu/~myl/languagelog/archives/003469.html#more

Go raibh [do rogha meafar] leat!

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Róman
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Username: Róman

Post Number: 469
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Saturday, August 19, 2006 - 03:05 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

As we at name places - does anyone know the CORRECT Irish version of Gougan Barra? I have seen (on official direction signs):

Gúgán Barra
Gúagan Barra (unbelievable, isn't it? - sign in Béal Átha'n Ghaorthaigh)
Gúgan Barra

Other thing is Renaneery (which is invariably pronounced Renaree by locals):

Réidh na nDoirí (the map)
Reidh na nDoirí (on the entrence to the baile)
Rae na nDoirí (sign on Oifig an Phoist)

Macroom:

Maigh Chromtha (must be correct according to me)
Magh Chromtha
Machromtha

Is it really so controversial to have signs right? Cannot imagine something like this in any other country!

(Message edited by Róman on August 19, 2006)

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Eoin
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Username: Eoin

Post Number: 121
Registered: 10-2004


Posted on Saturday, August 19, 2006 - 04:14 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

There was a famous one on the Luas (Dublin's new Street Car) where a sign stated boldly "Féach an ceart!"

Turns out they were trying to say "Look to the right!"

I think the sign was only up for about two days when the red-faced authorities removed it. Don't know what's there now but not before Lá published a picture.

A new street was called Cows Lane/Lána an bhó. There were ructions and letters were written etc etc. that it should be Lána na mbó.

The Corporation recognised that there was a mistake and the name was corrected but not in the way that everybody expected. I understand it now reads Cow's Lane/Lána an Bhó.

E

Nuacht Ghaeltacht na Gaillimhe agus Deisceart Mhuigheó http://anghaeltacht.net/ce

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William
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Username: William

Post Number: 16
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Saturday, August 19, 2006 - 05:10 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

This is the country that produced "The Third Policeman", "An Béal Bocht" and "Finnegans Wake".

Of course, all the signs are right.

No Celtic Tiger will ever scare the de Selby out of Ireland.

"Human existence being an hallucination containing in itself the secondary hallucinations of day and night (the latter an insanitary condition of the atmosphere due to the accretions of black air) it ill becomes any man of sense to be concerned at the illusory approach of the supreme hallucination called death."

--DE SELBY

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Taidhgín
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Username: Taidhgín

Post Number: 18
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Saturday, August 19, 2006 - 05:34 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

A little knowledge is dangerous when it comes to Irish ... Near the all-Irish school, Coláiste Chilliain, in Cluain Dolcáin, Co Bhaile Átha Cliath is "Grange Road" Unless it has been changed recently the Irish version given was "Bóthar an Ghráinseach" (recte "Bóthar na Gráinsí") and most unfortunately on that road a new public golf course has been built with a very fine large granite entrance that carries its title in both Irish and English in huge letters engraved into the stone. "Grange Golf Club" appears on one side and on the other? "Galfchúrsa an Ghráinseach" (recte "Galfchúrsa na Gráinsí")

I phoned the relevant authority and someone made the comment "Aw! That's M ---- M ----, he's very enthusiastic about Irish."

Tá súil agam go dtiocfaidh feabhas ar an scéal leis an Acht Teanga / I hope matters will improve as a result of the Languages Act and that -- accurate -- bilingual signage will be erected as in Wales. (I know mistranslations will occur but that is the state of the languages. Learners have to be employed since Irish-dominant native speakers hardly exist any more.)

Then there is the issue of whether Dublin's main street should be "Sráid Uí Chonaill" or "Sráid Ó Conaill". That's another topic.

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Róman
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Username: Róman

Post Number: 471
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Saturday, August 19, 2006 - 05:50 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Is it "Sráid Ó Conaill"?!? Unbelievable!

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Taidhgín
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Username: Taidhgín

Post Number: 19
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Saturday, August 19, 2006 - 07:15 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

No. It is not. But there are those who claim that the Tuiseal Ginideach should not be used in such situations. I do not honestly know where they get that idea from but then I'm only a learner and there is much at the end of Chapters that I never even reached in my study of Irish -- such as the use of the Nominative / Tuiseal Ainmneach instead of the Genitive or Possessive / Tuiseal Ginideach. I suspect there may be a difference between "Uí Chonaill" where ownership or possession is involved and "Ó Conaill" which may be "attributive" whatever that means. I wonder does anyone here know if there are references to this in the grammar books? I have been pulled up on it in the Gaeltacht by people who knew traditional Irish well. Us learners probably use the TG more than is necessary.

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Róman
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Username: Róman

Post Number: 472
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Saturday, August 19, 2006 - 07:41 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Gaeltacht people (especially in Conamara) often skip TG altogether. What with all due respect, still, doesn't make their Irish "a traditional Irish". In my conviction good traditional Irish is only to be found in the books published at the turn XXth century. Later on it was just downhill.

The only instance where TG has to substituted for TA - is the sequences of several TG one after another (but still séimhiú is a must in these situations).

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Fear_na_mbróg
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Username: Fear_na_mbróg

Post Number: 1178
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Saturday, August 19, 2006 - 11:28 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

quote:

The only instance where TG has to substituted for TA - is the sequences of several TG one after another (but still séimhiú is a must in these situations)

One might argue that they are in the TG, but that they aren't mutated ;).

Yes, I've seen plenty of bad Irish on signs. I've driven through Clondalkin myself in the past, and seen the large granite sign, "Galfchúrsa na Gráinsí". The question that comes to mind for me is: Who the hell did they ask? Even if we supplied them with a phone number they could ring to confirm the grammar, do you think they'd use it?

Fáilte Roimh Cheartúcháin
Ceartaigh rud ar bith atá mícheart -- úsáid phrásaí go háirithe.

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Dennis
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Username: Dennis

Post Number: 1748
Registered: 02-2005


Posted on Saturday, August 19, 2006 - 11:49 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

quote:

Macroom:

Maigh Chromtha (must be correct according to me)
Magh Chromtha
Machromtha

This is complicated. The Irish language and its spelling have evolved. I've also seen "Má Chromtha". Maynooth (NUI), in its official publications used to be (as recently as a few decades ago) "Má Nuad" and is now "Maigh Nuad". We're dealing with the word for "plain", which is now "má" in standard orthography. It was spelled "mag" in OI, and "magh" in Classical Modern Irish. "Maigh" is actually the old dative form, but datives have had a way of getting petrified in place names (such as Corcaigh, for instance), since placenames are usually found following prepositions ("in X, at X, to X"). So, the three forms "Magh, Má, Maigh" all have a logical claim on being the "proper" spelling. Apparently the place name authorities finally decided that "Maigh" is the form to use in logainmneacha. But it takes a while to propogate such decisions, and old signage doesn't get replaced overnight.

Go raibh [do rogha meafar] leat!

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Dennis
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Username: Dennis

Post Number: 1749
Registered: 02-2005


Posted on Saturday, August 19, 2006 - 12:07 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

A Rogues' Gallery of Dublin street signs:

I nGaeilge:
http://www.photopol.com/signs/sraidbac/sraidbac.html

Agus i mBéarla:
http://www.photopol.com/signs/sraidbac/dubstreet.html

Go raibh [do rogha meafar] leat!

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Suaimhneas
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Username: Suaimhneas

Post Number: 3
Registered: 08-2006
Posted on Monday, August 21, 2006 - 06:19 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

I've heard a story that when the offices of the devolved Scottish administration were being built in Edinburgh it was decided that the nameplates for the various government departments would be bilingual, English and Gaelic. However, in every single case the word "Roinn" was mispelled as "Rionn"

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Antaine
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Username: Antaine

Post Number: 836
Registered: 10-2004


Posted on Monday, August 21, 2006 - 03:00 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

"House of the Carpenter"

Teach An Shaor Adhmaid?

(out of curiosity)

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Barney (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 159.134.220.193
Posted on Monday, August 21, 2006 - 03:49 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

You might hear both:

teach an saor adhmad

teach an saor adhmaid

Saor is an old word for mason or carpenter. Relates to noble, so I dont know it there is cultural history in that. Maybe it originated in the feudal part of Ireland (freeman ~noble to be free etc, but that is conjecture).Does anyone know more about it?

No lenition if you follow the dental rule. The noun is as you put it masc and in the genetive.

How about this:

Teach an chearpantóra (if you follow an initially slender modality, see the dative thread for reference)

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Taidhgín
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Username: Taidhgín

Post Number: 23
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Monday, August 21, 2006 - 04:16 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Why am I thinking "teach an tsaoir"?

Would "teach an tsaor adhmaid" be correct? Putting in the "t roimh s = séimhiú" but not inflecting the first word since it is part of the Tuiseal Ginideach following? I haven't a clue how to explain the grammar there but I have a notion it is correct, treating "saor adhmaid" as if they were one word? Tá sé níos fusa Gaeilge a labhairt ná an ghramadach a mhíniú.

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Fear_na_mbróg
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Username: Fear_na_mbróg

Post Number: 1179
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Monday, August 21, 2006 - 04:21 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

quote:

"House of the Carpenter"

Teach An Shaor Adhmaid?

If we were dealing with any other consonant, yes. However, "S" gets special treatment. See below.

quote:

You might hear both:

teach an saor adhmad

teach an saor adhmaid

These are both wrong.

Nominative case: An Saor Adhmaid
Genitive case: An tSaoir Adhmaid

"The Carpenter's House" would indeed be "Teach an tSaoir Adhmaid"

Fáilte Roimh Cheartúcháin
Ceartaigh rud ar bith atá mícheart -- úsáid phrásaí go háirithe.

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Fear_na_mbróg
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Username: Fear_na_mbróg

Post Number: 1180
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Monday, August 21, 2006 - 04:23 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Also, consider the Irish surname:

Séamas Mac an tSaoir

"Son of the craftsman"

Fáilte Roimh Cheartúcháin
Ceartaigh rud ar bith atá mícheart -- úsáid phrásaí go háirithe.

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Barney (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 159.134.220.8
Posted on Monday, August 21, 2006 - 04:39 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Ya, thats a bad one indeed (from a written perspective).

My apologies to anyone I mislead.

The old Irish def art for a s-initial masc was in the genitive 'int', thus '(an t)saoir adhmaid' would logically follow today (if im not incorrect again)

However, my confusion is understandable in one sense, as I listen for the sounds, more so than grammar. Listening to irish been spoken, there is no difference between -ir and -or for many people, i.e. only one r is used.

So why the writing of it different?

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Barney (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 159.134.220.8
Posted on Monday, August 21, 2006 - 04:43 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

PS,

FnamB,

what about t-prefix to s in prepositional phrases, such as 'on the X'? Would it be correct to say that in Donegal both masc and fem nouns have t before s, where as it is more likely to be just masculine nouns elsewhere, i.e in the dative

bear with me -i'm internalising the grammar

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Abigail
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Username: Abigail

Post Number: 33
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Monday, August 21, 2006 - 05:12 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

That's correct, so far as I know.

But no difference between broad and slender 'r'? I think I'm hearing one, at least from Connemara and Munster speakers. It's not often I get to talk to anyone from an Ulster Gaeltacht so I couldn't tell you about that.

(Hearing the difference and producing it correctly myself are two different things, of course...)

Abigail

Tá fáilte roimh chuile cheartú!

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Pangur_dubh
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Username: Pangur_dubh

Post Number: 124
Registered: 03-2006


Posted on Monday, August 21, 2006 - 06:19 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

A Fhir na mBróg & Uile,


I would say Teach an tSaor Adhmaid.

Compare: Imeachtaí Dháil Éireann - NOT Imeachtaí Dála Éireann. (Proceedings of the Dail of Ireland).

The rule here, as far as I can remember is that when two self-referencing genitives occur, the first one assumes the nominative form, but takes lenition where possible.

Anyone agree/disagree?

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lee walshe (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 62.254.32.18
Posted on Monday, August 21, 2006 - 06:19 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

hi there

i am a (very poor) irish speaker living in the north of ireland.. friends of ours have bought a lovely wee cottage and want to call it an irish name.. BUT the problem is people up here dont really speak irish so whilst something like "ard na mara" is ok, others give a problem.

Can anyone suggest a nice, pronouncable name for a country cottage?

Also can you tell me what "peaceful cottage" would be? i guessed teachín síocháin but not sure!

I'd be most grateful if you can help.. thanks

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Pangur_dubh
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Username: Pangur_dubh

Post Number: 125
Registered: 03-2006


Posted on Monday, August 21, 2006 - 06:24 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Bothán Aoibhinn- pleasant Cottage... or Teachín Aoibhinn

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Barney (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 159.134.220.22
Posted on Monday, August 21, 2006 - 08:03 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Pangur Dubh's example sounds like the use of the Null form instead of the Gen:

ruball CHAT Bhearnaigh (Barney's cat's tail)

The middle noun seems to be partially declined; the last one fully (if possible).

Maybe it is that all 'middle' ones are partial/partitive:

teach mhac chat Bhearnaigh (Barney's cat's son's house)

Question: do feminine nouns inflect this way too? Ex:
this is the 'normal' form -teach na fuinneoige (House of the window), that is, with no initial mutation, normally.

Now however~ solas fhuinneog Choinn (conn's window's light)????????



Abigail,
there is of course a distinction between -ir and -ar in (tradional/native) speech, but a few days ago someone rubbished the idea of a distinction between -ob and -ib, which leads me to think there is no difference made by many on this board as regards velar and palatal, hence my question as to the stringent constraints in grammar when the speaker might not make that distinction. I'm not casting aspersions on FnamB's faculty, as he has not pointed out either way, nor is it relivant to the wider discusion, just my observation.

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Fear_na_mbróg
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Username: Fear_na_mbróg

Post Number: 1181
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Monday, August 21, 2006 - 09:25 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

quote:

Listening to irish been spoken, there is no difference between -ir and -or for many people, i.e. only one r is used.

So why the writing of it different?

I pronounce "saor" like the first syllable of the female name "Sarah". I pronounce "saoir" like the first syllable of "Sears Catalogue".

Regardless of whether it's pronounced differently, you'll eventually have to acquiesce to the idea of same-sounding words having different spellings. Think "no" Vs "know". You spell it wrong if you leave out the "i", plain and simple.

quote:

what about t-prefix to s in prepositional phrases, such as 'on the X'? Would it be correct to say that in Donegal both masc and fem nouns have t before s, where as it is more likely to be just masculine nouns elsewhere, i.e in the dative

Let's take sample words.

Masculine: siúcra
Feminine: sráid

Chonaic mé an tsráid. Chonaic mé an siúcra.
Is maith liom cuma na sráide. Is maith liom cuma an tsiúcra.
Táim ag féachaint ar an tsráid. Táim ag féachaint ar an siúcra.

(In Ulster, they'll say "ar an tsiúcra").

quote:

I would say Teach an tSaor Adhmaid.

Compare: Imeachtaí Dháil Éireann - NOT Imeachtaí Dála Éireann. (Proceedings of the Dail of Ireland).

The rule here, as far as I can remember is that when two self-referencing genitives occur, the first one assumes the nominative form, but takes lenition where possible.

Anyone agree/disagree?

I'm not fluent in Irish -- my vocabulary is too measly. However, my grammar is top-notch... so I feel I can give a slightly authoritive answer here.

"Teach an tSaor Adhmaid" is wrong -- "saor" should be in its mutated genitive form, "saoir".

What's happening with "Imeachtaí Dháil Éireann" is this:

1) "Éire" is a definite noun.
2) "Dáil" is indefinite, but when its described by a definite noun, they combine to form a definite noun. As per usual, the second word mutates to its genitive form.
3) Now "Dáil Éireann" is a definite noun in and of itself.

The rule is this: Only the right-most definite noun gets mutated. Any other definite nouns simply take a séimhiú. Examples:

Cóta Sheáin
Cara Mháire
Ainm Dheartháir an Bhuachalla
Imeachtaí Dháil Éireann
Bratach Shasana
Cóta Chara Sheáin
Cóta Mhac Chara Dheartháir an tSeinnteora

Any indefinite nouns (and also adjectives) abide by the usual rules (i.e. séimhiú for feminine):

cóta gorm an bhuachalla
feadóg ghorm an bhuachalla

Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia = Iar-Phoblacht Iúgslavach na Macadóine

Take the following example:

the leaky rusty pipe of the large school's faulty heating system = píopa ligeach meirgeach chóras téimh lochtach na scoile móire

1) We see "córas" is the left-most definite noun (except for "píopa" of course). It doesn't get mutated because only the last definite noun gets mutated. Instead, it simply takes a séimhiú.
2) "téamh" is in its mutated genitive form because it's indefinite.
3) "lochtach" describes "córas"; there is no séimhiú on "lochtach".
4) "an scoil mhór" is the right-most definite noun, so it takes on its mutated genitive form: na scoile móire.

quote:

teach na fuinneoige (House of the window)
solas fhuinneog Choinn

These are both correct.

Fáilte Roimh Cheartúcháin
Ceartaigh rud ar bith atá mícheart -- úsáid phrásaí go háirithe.

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Johnny_filters
Member
Username: Johnny_filters

Post Number: 4
Registered: 05-2006
Posted on Tuesday, August 22, 2006 - 07:03 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Chonac comhartha ar an ndroichead i Neidín le aistiú uafásach. Is é Inbhear Scéinne an ainm ceart nó Kenmare River as Gaeilge, ach úsáidtear 'An Ribhéar'!

FRC

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Steph McDowall (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 85.210.60.183
Posted on Thursday, August 24, 2006 - 05:02 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Thank you all for your help with our house name, we have decided after deliberation on all your suggestions to call it Beannachtai !

Many thanks,

Steph.

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Mickrua
Member
Username: Mickrua

Post Number: 67
Registered: 07-2005
Posted on Thursday, August 24, 2006 - 10:29 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

siúinéir = carpenter
Teach an t-Siúinéara = Carpenter's House
A saor is a craftsperson m.sh saor cloch/cloiche = stone mason/craftsman
gabh = blacksmith would also be a saor

(Message edited by Mickrua on August 24, 2006)

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Fear_na_mbróg
Member
Username: Fear_na_mbróg

Post Number: 1192
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Thursday, August 24, 2006 - 12:02 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

quote:

Teach an t-Siúinéara = Carpenter's House

I don't think a hyphen is ever used to separate "t" and "s".

Fáilte Roimh Cheartúcháin
Ceartaigh rud ar bith atá mícheart -- úsáid phrásaí go háirithe.

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Ní Bhirin (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 213.94.134.80
Posted on Monday, September 11, 2006 - 02:29 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

I am currently building a house in the south east of ireland and would like to give it an irish name i love Irish but am not very good at it!

I would be grateful for any help!
Gó raibh míle maith agát!!!

Ní Bhirin.

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