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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 2005- » 2006 (January-February) » Archive through February 24, 2006 » Ta si « Previous Next »

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Marcia (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 65.3.135.148
Posted on Wednesday, February 15, 2006 - 09:33 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Exactly, how do you say 'yes' in Gaeilge?

I know that 'ta' affirms as a positive yes to someone/something, but is that it... just 'ta'? Why am I thinking of 'ta si' as 'yes'? Is a 'yes' just 'tá'?

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James
Member
Username: James

Post Number: 321
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Wednesday, February 15, 2006 - 11:42 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Marcia,

This is a common source of frustration for beginners. There is no clear cut "yes" and "no" as there is in English. The "yes" and "no" concept is tied directly to the verb associated with the affirmative or negative statement.

For example (mar sampla)...

If you ask, 'would you eat fish' which I think would be
"An d'íosfá tú iasc" the answer would be "I would eat" or "I would eat it".... d'íosfainn or d'íosfainn é if the answer is in the affirmative. Níl d'íosfainn é if in the negative . A simple "yes" or "no" answer does not exist in Irish.

T áis used when the interoggative phrase "An bhfuil" is used. An bhfuíl tú tinn? Tá...tá me tinn.

If the copula "is" is used...Is doctúr é? The response is "is ea"..he is or Ní hea...he is not.

If any of my translations are wrong, the native speakers and fluent students will chime in a put things on track. The translations may be off but the concept is correct.

Like I said...this can be confusing as the devil!! I still struggle with it. I recognize it when it's wrong (at least I think I do!!) but I have a hard time explaining it.

If I've confused more than I've helped..hang in there..we'll both be set straight in no time!

Is minic a bhris beál duine a shrón.

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Larry
Member
Username: Larry

Post Number: 142
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Thursday, February 16, 2006 - 05:34 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

With respect...

An íosfadh tú...? - Would you eat...?

There is no d' with a question in the conditional mood of the verb.

d'íosfá - Yes (I would eat)
Ní íosfá - No (I would not eat)

James was correct with the main thrust of his answer insofar as you echo the verb used.

Larry Ackerman

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Larry
Member
Username: Larry

Post Number: 143
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Thursday, February 16, 2006 - 06:14 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

My apologies...

An íosfá...? - Would you eat...?
...
d'íosfainn - Yes (I would eat)
Ní íosfainn - No (I would not eat)

(Message edited by Larry on February 16, 2006)

Larry Ackerman

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Lughaidh
Member
Username: Lughaidh

Post Number: 1244
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Thursday, February 16, 2006 - 08:37 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

In Irish, in answers you never repeat the subject, except when it is inside the verb (ie. in the ending). I know many teachers who teach their pupils to answer with the verb and the subject after, but actually Gaeltacht speakers never do that.

'Bhfuil sí ann? - Tá / Níl

Munster: an rabhais ann ? - Bhíos / Ní rabhas

etc.

Now, there is an important rule as well that is seldom taught to learners: with the verb "tá a fhios ag + SUBJECT" = to know, you have to repeat "a fhios" in the answer, and not only tá/níl. I have learnt that in Donegal Gaeltacht, but I'm sure it is the same in the other Gaeltachtaí. So:

’Bhfuil a fhios agat...? Tá a fhios / Níl a fhios

pronounced:

/wil' as ogod?/ - /ta:s/, /N'al'əs/. (so: "a fhios" is pronounced /(ə)s/ in sentences with the verb "to know").


In Donegal, many people have simplified the system of "yes/no" answers:

Sé / Ní hé as answers to most questions with the copula.
Ex: An tusa a rinne an cáca sin? - Sé / Ní hé. (heard from an old woman, native speaker from Donegal).

With many young speakers (I've heard that from a native speaker from Tory Island, who was about 20y.o.), the answer will always be "sé" or "nó" for "yes" and "no" respectively.

An bhfuair tú é? - Sé / Nó

Tír Chonaill abú!

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James
Member
Username: James

Post Number: 322
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Thursday, February 16, 2006 - 02:52 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Larry,

Thanks for the correction. Just one more of the many nuances of the language for me to learn!

Is minic a bhris beál duine a shrón.

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Marcia (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 65.3.215.231
Posted on Saturday, February 18, 2006 - 08:28 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

A chairde,

Interesting that somehow, I actually understand it. :)

I suppose it would all be much easier if I spoke/wrote Gaeilge more often.

Míle buíochas!

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Fear_na_mbróg
Member
Username: Fear_na_mbróg

Post Number: 1030
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Sunday, February 19, 2006 - 08:20 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

I'll write a short passage and translate it:

-Seán, did you close the door?
-Yes.
-Good man. Did you open the window?
-No.
-Well if I make you dinner, will you open the window?
-Yes, we have a deal!
-Can you swim?
-Yes.
-Do you swim every morning?
-No.

-A Sheáin, ar dhún tú an doras?
-Dhún.
-Maith an fear. Ar oscail tú an fhuinneog?
-Níor oscail.
-Bhuel dá n-ullmhóin dinnéar dúit, an n-osclófá an fhuinneog?
-D'osclóinn, tá margadh againn! (Note we have both the verb and the person).
-An féidir leat snámh?
-Is féidir (I'm not sure if you repeat "féidir" or if you can just say "Is ea" or "Sea").
-An snámhann tú gach maidin?
-Ní shnámhaim. (Note we have verb plus person).

Fáilte Roimh Cheartúcháin
Correct me for the love of God... I'm a perfectionist! : )

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Julia
Member
Username: Julia

Post Number: 3
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Sunday, February 19, 2006 - 04:31 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

One trick that mo mhúinteoir taught me (and that I've found immensely helpful) is to learn every verb with its question form, affirmative, and negative all togehter.

Mar shampla, when I first learned a sentence with tá in it, my whole class practiced saying:
An bhfuil?
+Tá
-Níl
a few times together. We'd even make a question mark when saying "an bhfuil", and then give the thumbs up for "tá" and the thumbs down for "níl".

It might sound a little inane, but I've learned all my verbs this way. It's really helpful because then when you hear a question, you already have the positive or negative form of the verb stored nearby in your memory. I think it's especially helpful for irregular verbs--if you can hear

an bhfaca?
+Chonaic
-Ni fhaca

in your head, it's easier to actually use the right form to reply.

FRC - Fáilte Roimh Cheartúcháin



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