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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 2005- » 2005 (September-October) » Archive through September 15, 2005 » Béarlachas & Alternatives « Previous Next »

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Dennis
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Username: Dennis

Post Number: 156
Registered: 02-2005


Posted on Tuesday, August 30, 2005 - 11:50 am:   Edit Post Print Post

quote:

For example, you hear things like 'Tá sé suas leat féin' for 'It's up to you.' Can anyone think of others that you've heard -- and what the more natural way of saying them in Irish might be?



Fút féin atá sé.

Here's one I used here a few days ago. It sounds almost natural to me, although I know that it's an English encroachment:

*Tá sé chomh leadránach. = It's so boring.

Better: Tá sé an-leadránach. What else works?

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 1835
Registered: 08-2004


Posted on Tuesday, August 30, 2005 - 12:00 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Ceann ar fuath liom, agus ar thagar Nollaig Ó Gadhra dhó i bhFoinse na seachtaine; nós na nuasal a bheith de shíor ag "lainseáil" rudaí i leaba bheith dá "sheoladh"

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TSJ
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Posted From: 66.105.234.5
Posted on Tuesday, August 30, 2005 - 03:19 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Can anyone tell me where I can get material to study real Irish in order to get rid of my bearlachas?

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Dalta
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Posted From: 83.70.240.222
Posted on Tuesday, August 30, 2005 - 03:57 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

TSJ, I think it just comes from being around Irish speakers and picking it up. Of course, a lot of Béarlachas is used even in the Gaeltacht nowadays. Usually though, you can tell yourself when it's Béarlachas. If it translates literally asa Hiberno-English, then it's probably ok, otherwise, it's probably not. Of course, nowadays, even Hiberno-English is on the slide.

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Domhnall
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Username: Domhnall

Post Number: 82
Registered: 06-2005


Posted on Tuesday, August 30, 2005 - 05:31 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Caithfidh mé a rá nach maith liomsa Béarlachas in aon chor ach ;
Is fearr Gaeilge briste ná Béarla Cliste - nach ceart an rud é?!

(Message edited by Domhnall on August 30, 2005)

Ní Síocháin Go Saoirse.
Is í slánú na Gaeilge athghabháil na Saoirse

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TSJ
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Posted From: 66.105.234.19
Posted on Tuesday, August 30, 2005 - 09:54 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Thank you for your comments. They were all very helpful. However I live in California and there are no speakers around to converse with. I was thinking more about printed and/or recorded material specially designed to teach non-native speakers how to express themselves in genuine Irish. Is fearr Gaeilge bhriste na bearla cliste has always been my motto. I am usually aware of when I am speaking bearlachas but I see it as a step in the right direction.In order to proceed further towards real Irish I need to find
a book or a course which addresses the problems of going from bearlachas to Irish as it is spoken by the native speakers. There are many courses on the market and they are very good but unfortunately they tend to be more entertaining than instructive. I don't need any more grammar books either. What I am looking for is a conversational manual with Gaeltacht Irish. If you see any out there please let me know. I would be very grateful.

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Lughaidh
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Username: Lughaidh

Post Number: 652
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Wednesday, August 31, 2005 - 03:56 am:   Edit Post Print Post

>Ceann ar fuath liom, agus ar thagar Nollaig Ó Gadhra >dhó i bhFoinse na seachtaine; nós na nuasal a bheith de >shíor ag "lainseáil" rudaí i leaba bheith dá "sheoladh"

You are mixing two things there: Anglicism and loanword.

An Anglicism is more an expression or an idiom translated literally from English to Irish. A loanword isn't "dangerous" for the language: there have always been loanwords, even in Old Irish and before. But ANglicisms are more dangerous because it means you think in English when speaking in Irish: Irish is loosing its originality to become a copy of English. You can make a sentence with only loanwords, it will be Irish anyway. But if you make a sentence with only Gaelic words, put together in an English way, it won't be Irish anymore.

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Lughaidh
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Username: Lughaidh

Post Number: 653
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Wednesday, August 31, 2005 - 03:58 am:   Edit Post Print Post

>*Tá sé chomh leadránach. = It's so boring.

>Better: Tá sé an-leadránach. What else works?

I think that you can say "tá sé chomh leadránach sin".

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Antaine
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Username: Antaine

Post Number: 483
Registered: 10-2004


Posted on Wednesday, August 31, 2005 - 10:02 am:   Edit Post Print Post

"However I live in California and there are no speakers around to converse with."

!!!!!


http://www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/gaeilge/ranganna/SA/California.html

plus whatever else you can find on the Daltaí "Events" page...

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Dennis
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Username: Dennis

Post Number: 159
Registered: 02-2005


Posted on Wednesday, August 31, 2005 - 11:08 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Lughaidh a dúirt:
quote:

I think that you can say "tá sé chomh leadránach sin".



You can, but it doesn't mean quite the same thing. "Tá sé chomh leadránach sin" implies a comparison (It's that boring = it's as boring as that) while our target expression (It's so boring) does not.

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 1842
Registered: 08-2004


Posted on Wednesday, August 31, 2005 - 11:45 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Is an dara bhrí a bhaineadh mise as "tá sé chomh leadránach sin".

Mar shampla: Tá sé chomh fada sin ó chuir mé ríomhaithne ortsa don chéad uair.

Gach seans gur tionchar an Bhéarla atá ansin, áfach.

quote:

You are mixing two things there: Anglicism and loanword.



Tá sin fíor. Ach tá "continuum" ann ó abairtí iomlána i Béarla nó béarlagar an Bhéarla, chomh fada le corr focail san ait go bhfuil focal bhreá sa ghaeilge cheana.

Bfhearrde muid gan an rud an fad, ach is deacair fail réidh leis. Go hairithe nuair atá na nuachtáin go holc sa dóigh sin.

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Dennis
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Username: Dennis

Post Number: 160
Registered: 02-2005


Posted on Wednesday, August 31, 2005 - 11:58 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Dúirt Aonghus:
quote:

Tá sé chomh fada sin ó chuir mé ríomhaithne ortsa don chéad uair.



Bheinn sásta leis sin i gcomhrá mar seo:

- Cathain a tháinig tú go Bleá Cliath? Ní cuimhin liom.
- Fiche bliain ó shin.
- Fiche bliain?! Dáiríre?
- Sea, tá sé chomh fada sin ó chuir mé aithne ort den chéad uair.

Dála an scéil, "ríomhaithne"?? Sin ceann nua domsa.

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TSJ
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Posted From: 66.105.234.36
Posted on Wednesday, August 31, 2005 - 01:12 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Thank you, Antaine, for the link which shows where Irish Language classes are available in California. However the information given for San Diego is out of date. As far as I know, Fintan Moore has not taught Irish classes here for ten years. Shanti Hofshi teaches a beginners' class on Friday evenings at 7 pm. at The House of Ireland in Balboa Park. This class is attended mostly by Americans who are studying Irish for the first time. What I was looking for specifically was some written and/or recorded material which would be appropriate for those who already have attained a certain level of fluency but who wish to improve their conversational skills in authentic Gaeltacht Irish. For example, a Manual of Irish Conversation {with real Irish as spoken by the native speakers, not bearlachas). Are there any comic books available in Irish? These would be a tremendous help in acquiring fluency in genuine Irish conversation. There used to be one in Irleand when I was growing up. It was called Tir na n-Og. Your help is always appreciaited.

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Max
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Username: Max

Post Number: 132
Registered: 05-2005
Posted on Wednesday, August 31, 2005 - 01:32 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

>>You can, but it doesn't mean quite the same thing. "Tá sé chomh leadránach sin" implies a comparison (It's that boring = it's as boring as that) while our target expression (It's so boring) does not.

how about:

Chomh leadránach leis! (How boring it is!)

??

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Dennis
Member
Username: Dennis

Post Number: 166
Registered: 02-2005


Posted on Wednesday, August 31, 2005 - 04:50 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Dúirt Max:
quote:

Chomh leadránach leis! (How boring it is!)



That's good Irish, too, but my sense is that the pattern "Chomh X leis/léi/leat!" is mainly used as an exclamation about people, not things, and tends to express a degree of surprise, real or feigned, and some familiarity.

Oh, chomh mór leat! (to a little boy: "How big you've gotten!")

Oh, chomh hálainn leat! (to a girl/woman: "How beautiful you are!")

Personally I won't say "chomh leadránach leis!" in the context of "Is fuath liom an clár sin. Tá sé (thar a bheith) leadránach." (I hate that programme. It's sooooo boring.) Maybe others would.

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Dalta
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Posted From: 83.70.240.222
Posted on Wednesday, August 31, 2005 - 05:01 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

TSJ, the only thing I can really think of, short of going to the Gaeltacht yourself, is listen to Raidió na Gaeltachta whenever you can. The adress is rnag.ie . Alot of it is music, but they do occasionaly stop for a chat about something. Try also www.tg4.ie , a TV station,but you have to pay for that one. I think Lughaidh might know some courses that help in pronunciation and genuine Gaeltacht speak.

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Maidhc_Ó_g
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Username: Maidhc_Ó_g

Post Number: 67
Registered: 05-2005
Posted on Thursday, September 01, 2005 - 04:49 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Tá sé chomh leadránach le sin, I think could be used. The English version is really an incomplete phrase that begs to be the first part of a punchline.
It's sooo boring. How boring is it?! Tá sé chomh leadránach is gáifeach le sin go mbeadh sé mo spreagadh isteach m'uaigh ar a laghad ag BÁS!

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Dennis
Member
Username: Dennis

Post Number: 173
Registered: 02-2005


Posted on Thursday, September 01, 2005 - 12:01 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

quote:

Tá sé chomh leadránach is gáifeach le sin go mbeadh sé mo spreagadh isteach m'uaigh ar a laghad ag BÁS!



Sin leadránach! Ach ní dhéanann "le sin" aon obair san abairt sin. Is féidir é a fhágáil ar lár:

- Cé chomh leadránach agus atá sé?

- Tá sé chomh leadránach agus go gcuirfeadh sé néal an bháis ar dhuine!

Aren' t there jokes like that? "How boring is it? It's so boring that..."

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Lughaidh
Member
Username: Lughaidh

Post Number: 661
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Thursday, September 01, 2005 - 01:01 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Is féidir na rudaí sin a ráidht mar seo:

nach álainn í!
nach leadránach é!

srl

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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 1843
Registered: 08-2004


Posted on Thursday, September 01, 2005 - 03:09 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

quote:

Dála an scéil, "ríomhaithne"?? Sin ceann nua domsa.



ríomhaire + aithne. Níor bhuaileamar le chéile sa seomra mór gorm riamh, ce go bhfuil muid ag léamh tchtí a chéile leis na blianta anois.

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Maidhc_Ó_g
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Username: Maidhc_Ó_g

Post Number: 68
Registered: 05-2005
Posted on Friday, September 02, 2005 - 01:35 am:   Edit Post Print Post

A Dhennis,
Yes, that was my point. 'It's so boring' is accepted as a complete phrase even though, grammarically, it really isn't. Ok,... It's so boring - what? And you might here someone ask, "How boring is it?" and get sarcastic punchline answers, such as the ones provided by the two of us, in return.
Oh yes, agus GRMA len gceartúchan le mo ghramadach.

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Dennis
Member
Username: Dennis

Post Number: 178
Registered: 02-2005


Posted on Friday, September 02, 2005 - 11:44 am:   Edit Post Print Post

"He's so boring that he can't even entertain a doubt."

Fuair mé é sin ar an idirlíon (a bhuí le Google). Ní féidir an t-imeartas focal sin a aistriú go Gaeilge, ar ndóigh.


Seo ceann eile, cé nach bhfuil sé chomh cliste leis an gceann thuas:

Tá sé chomh leadránach agus go gcuirfeadh sé codladh ar iasc.

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Robert
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Posted From: 62.75.220.209
Posted on Tuesday, September 06, 2005 - 06:45 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Maybe one could start by saying 'in Irish' as i nGaeilge, as opposed to the more fabricated 'as Gaeilge'.

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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 1873
Registered: 08-2004


Posted on Tuesday, September 06, 2005 - 08:27 am:   Edit Post Print Post

quote:

to the more fabricated 'as Gaeilge'



What is that comment based on? Both versions are common among fluent speakers, with "as Gaeilge" probably having the edge.

I know Google is not always reliable, but the results for "as Gaeilge" outnumber those for "i nGaeilge" by about 5:1

http://www.google.com/search?hl=ga&rls=GGLD%2CGGLD%3A2004-41%2CGGLD%3Aen&q=%22as+gaeilge%22 117,000 hits

GGLD:2004-41,GGLD:en&q=%22i+ngaeilge%22,http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=navclient&ie=UTF-8&rls=GGLD,GGLD:2004-41,GGLD:en&q=%22i+ngaeilge%22 18,300 hits

(Message edited by aonghus on September 06, 2005)

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Lughaidh
Member
Username: Lughaidh

Post Number: 693
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Tuesday, September 06, 2005 - 09:00 am:   Edit Post Print Post

>quote:to the more fabricated 'as Gaeilge'

>What is that comment based on? Both versions are common >among fluent speakers, with "as Gaeilge" probably >having the edge.

>I know Google is not always reliable, but the results >for "as Gaeilge" outnumber those for "i nGaeilge" by >about 5:1

Yes, it isn't reliable. "As Gaeilge" is the most used among learners (there are much more learners than native speakers on the web!), because it's what is taught in most schools! Why do they teach "as Gaeilge" rather than "i nGaeilge"? According to my old teacher, because "as" is not followed by any mutation (urú nor séimhiú) so it's easier to learn, than "i" that is followed by urú.

Actually, I know that some natives use "as Gaeilge", especially in Munster I think, but I'm sure that most native speakers do use "i nGaeilge" and never "as Gaeilge". In Donegal, where there is the biggest number of native speakers, I think, people wouldn't ever say "as Gaeilge". I don't know for the other Gaeltachtaí, maybe some of you will be able to talk about what they heard.

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 1874
Registered: 08-2004


Posted on Tuesday, September 06, 2005 - 10:24 am:   Edit Post Print Post

quote:

In Donegal, where there is the biggest number of native speakers



That is open to challenge. As I understand it, the Conamara gaeltacht is largest in terms of daily speakers of Irish.

And if it is a valid construct in Munster, then it is not fabricated.

I find this dialect parochialism very tiresome. You have been wrong on usage several times before for this particular reason.

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Robert
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Posted From: 62.75.220.209
Posted on Tuesday, September 06, 2005 - 10:38 am:   Edit Post Print Post

"What is that comment based on?"

Well, if you wanna be more gaeilgeoir than gailygore, then I think such touches, used in good spirit, are a start.

For me see below for a decent beginnings of a tool:
http://borel.slu.edu/gramadoir/foirm.html

more from the creator:
http://borel.slu.edu/nlp.html

If that was crossed with this:
http://www.ucc.ie/celt/

...one could have a body of written texts spanning the last 8 centuries, and ones grammar could be set aginst it (allowing for modern innovations and the possibly archaic writting styles of the old scools, of course -meaning a valid reconstrcution of irish since the 12th century as it was used would ahve to be created, thus the corpus is not in itself a true mirror of sppech, by any means). A parallel corpus of middle to modern English would be searched simoultanously, with the aim of highlighting anglicisms.

It would ahve to have some sort of 'depth coding' to distinguish naturalised angilicisms from centuries past.

And I know lampwhiches change (how I pronounce 'languages' when in the country), but it is all about keeping it genetically Irish

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Lughaidh
Member
Username: Lughaidh

Post Number: 696
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Tuesday, September 06, 2005 - 12:05 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

>That is open to challenge. As I understand it, the >Conamara gaeltacht is largest in terms of daily >speakers of Irish.

I said it was Donegal because I saw a paper made by RnaG with the percentage and number of Irish speakers in the Gaeltachtaí, and Ulster one was the biggest. Now if you don't agree with that, just contact RnaG ;-)

>And if it is a valid construct in Munster, then it is >not fabricated.

I have NEVER said it was fabricated, I wanted to say that the fact that learners, and websites, use more "as Gaeilge" than "i nGaeilge" is not representative of what is most said by native speakers, because most of these don't say "as Gaeilge".

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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 1875
Registered: 08-2004


Posted on Tuesday, September 06, 2005 - 12:12 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Tá mé buartha. Mheasc mé an rud a dúirt tusa agus an rud a dúirt Robert. Ní raibh mé ag iarraidh a chruthú le google narbh "Béarlachas" a bhí ann; ní raibh mé ach ag rá go raibh sé níos coitianta.

Glacaim le do phointe. Ach tá sé sa bhfoclóir!

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Lughaidh
Member
Username: Lughaidh

Post Number: 698
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Tuesday, September 06, 2005 - 12:16 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Tá sé san fhoclóir, chomh maith le rudaí nach ndeirtear ach i gcupla baile beag. Ní chiallaíonn sé gurb é sin a’ rud is coitianta.

Ní féidir gur Béarlachas é "as Gaeilge", siocair go bhfaigheadh muid "out (of) Irish" i mBéarla, ní dóigh liom gur Béarla ceart sin. To speak out of Irish, a book out of Irish. Tá cuma aisteach air sin, nach bhfuil?

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Dennis
Member
Username: Dennis

Post Number: 211
Registered: 02-2005


Posted on Tuesday, September 06, 2005 - 01:52 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

quote:

Tá sé san fhoclóir, chomh maith le rudaí nach ndeirtear ach i gcupla baile beag.



Rudaí cosúil le "cha"? Cé chomh forleathan is atá an focal sin sa Ghaeltacht inniu? An gcloistear go minic é i measc an aois óig i nGaoth Dobhair? An bhfuil sé le fáil i gcúrsaí ar nós "Now You're Talking" atá bunaithe ar Ghaeilge an Tuaiscirt?

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Séamas_Ó_neachtain
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Username: Séamas_Ó_neachtain

Post Number: 163
Registered: 11-2004


Posted on Tuesday, September 06, 2005 - 03:20 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

On the original subject, here are some good resources:

Conas a Rá - phrases collected by Gearóid Ó Laoi:
http://www.scoilgaeilge.org/lessons/GLee.htm

This is very difficult, but excellent for seeing the differences between forced and natural Irish:
http://www.acmhainn.ie/athchlo/lorganbhearla/index.html

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Lughaidh
Member
Username: Lughaidh

Post Number: 700
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Tuesday, September 06, 2005 - 04:15 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

>Rudaí cosúil le "cha"? Cé chomh forleathan is atá an >focal sin sa Ghaeltacht inniu?

tá sé le fáil i nGaeltacht Thír Chonaill go léir. Níl sé coitianta i dTeilinn, agus éiríonn sé coitianta nuair a théid tú ó thuaidh. Is é "ní" is coitianta ar an taobh theas de dh’Abhainn Ghaoth Dobhair, agus is é "cha" is coitianta ar an taobh thuaidh, is é sin le ráidht gur minice a chluintear "cha" i bparóistí Ghaoth Dobhair, Chloich Cheannfhaola, Toraigh, Ros Goill, srl.

>An gcloistear go minic é >i measc an aois óig i nGaoth Dobhair?

cluintear.

>An bhfuil sé le >fáil i gcúrsaí ar nós "Now You're Talking" atá bunaithe >ar Ghaeilge an Tuaiscirt?

Is dóigh liom é, ach chan chomh minic is a chluintear i nGaoth Dobhair é.

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Dennis
Member
Username: Dennis

Post Number: 214
Registered: 02-2005


Posted on Tuesday, September 06, 2005 - 04:57 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

quote:

is é sin le ráidht gur minice a chluintear "cha" i bparóistí Ghaoth Dobhair...



Is é an fáth ar chuir mé an cheist ná gur cuimhin liom daoine á rá ar Ghaelic-L nach raibh sé coitianta i nGaoth Dobhair. Chuaigh mé go dtí an chartlann anois díreach agus fuair mé na teachtaireachtaí seo leanas ón téad "Re: Files..." ó Mhí Eanáir 1996:

Willie Arbuckle:

Ní cluintear fá cheantar Ghaoth Dobhair é ach oiréad, a Bhriain. An té is coitianta ónár chuala mise é (agus cha lena chois) ná Panu s'againnne. Chaith mé cuid mhaith ama fá cheantar Gaoth Dobhair/Rann na Feirste agus níl cuimhne ar bith agamsa á chluinstin.

Ciarán McGuiness:

Tá an ceart agaibh - níl 'chan' coitianta thart fá Ghaoth Dobhair. Níl sé le cluinstean thíos i ngleann Cholm Cille ach an oiread. Cluintear 'chan fhuil', 'cha raibh' srl. i nGaeilge Thuaisceart Thír Chonaill - thart fá Mhachaire Rabhartaigh is Gort a' Choirce. Ar ndóigh is é sin an áit is gaire do Thoraigh na dTonn.

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Fear_na_mbróg
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Username: Fear_na_mbróg

Post Number: 783
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Wednesday, September 07, 2005 - 12:55 am:   Edit Post Print Post

quote:

Ní féidir gur Béarlachas é "as Gaeilge", siocair go bhfaigheadh muid "out (of) Irish" i mBéarla, ní dóigh liom gur Béarla ceart sin. To speak out of Irish, a book out of Irish. Tá cuma aisteach air sin, nach bhfuil?

Aontaím leat; ní as Béarla a tháinig "as Gaeilge". Dá dtabharfadh buille faoi thuairim mé:, má tógadh ceann díobh ó Bhéarla, déarfainn gurb "i nGaeilge" a tógadh.

quote:

http://borel.slu.edu/gramadoir/foirm.html

Láithrean Iontach!

Fáilte Roimh Cheartúcháin

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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 1880
Registered: 08-2004


Posted on Wednesday, September 07, 2005 - 05:40 am:   Edit Post Print Post

quote:

Tá sé san fhoclóir, chomh maith le rudaí nach ndeirtear ach i gcupla baile beag. Ní chiallaíonn sé gurb é sin a’ rud is coitianta.



Glacaim leis sin. Ach ní ghlacaim leis go bhfuil sé, mar a mhaígh Robert "fabricated". Ní gheobaidh tú leaganacha Béarla cosúil le "Tá sé suas agatsa" sna foclóirí - go fóill, pé scéil é.


Agus, cuma cad a chreideann aoinne, is iad na foghlaimeoirí cuid de thodhchaí na teangan - níl ach thart ar 25,000 duine ag labhairt Gaeilge go laethiúl sa Ghaeltacht, de réir Udarás na Gaeltachta.. "As gaeilge" atá i usáid ag móran ranna rialtas, agus fiú Ollscoile na hÉireann, Gaillimh, i gcaipéis a bhaineann leis an roinn i gCarna, sa ghaeltacht.

Dála an scéil, an cuimhin leat teideal an páipéir úd le RnaG a luaigh tú? Bhfuil sé le fail ar líne?

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Lughaidh
Member
Username: Lughaidh

Post Number: 704
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Wednesday, September 07, 2005 - 07:22 am:   Edit Post Print Post

>Ní cluintear fá cheantar Ghaoth Dobhair é ach oiréad, a >Bhriain. An té is coitianta ónár chuala mise é (agus >cha lena chois) ná Panu s'againnne. Chaith mé cuid >mhaith ama fá cheantar Gaoth Dobhair/Rann na Feirste >agus níl cuimhne ar bith agamsa á chluinstin.

>Ciarán McGuiness:

>Tá an ceart agaibh - níl 'chan' coitianta thart fá >Ghaoth Dobhair. Níl sé le cluinstean thíos i ngleann >Cholm Cille ach an oiread. Cluintear 'chan fhuil', 'cha >raibh' srl. i nGaeilge Thuaisceart Thír Chonaill - >thart fá Mhachaire Rabhartaigh

Go bhfios domh tá Machaire Rabhartaigh i bparóiste Ghaoth Dobhair!

>is Gort a' Choirce. Ar >ndóigh is é sin an áit is gaire do Thoraigh na dTonn.

Chuala mise féin i nGaoth Dobhair é (chan fhuair mé=i didn’t get, srl). Agus amharc ar an LASID agus ar altannaí le Wagner, Ó Buachalla agus Ó Dochartaigh (Éigse 16), agus tchífidh tú sin fosta. Gheobhfaidh tú cuid mhór "cha"-annaí i leabhar D. Uí Mhuirí fá Chomhréir Ghaeilge Ghaoth Dobhair.
Níl "chan fhuil" coitianta i nGaoth Dobhair (gheobhfá i gCloich Cheannfhaola é agus níos fuide thoir: Ros Goill, srl): deirtear "níl" i dtólamh i nGD. Ach maidir leis na briathra eile, is minic a chluintear "cha", "chan", "char". Ach is féidir gur lú a bhaineas na daoiní óga úsáid as "cha" ná daoiní níos sine: tá tionchar Gaeilg na scoile ar Ghaeilg na ndaoiní óga, agus níl mórán "cha"-ann i nGaeilg na scoile agus ins a’ chaighdeán go ginearálta.

>Dála an scéil, an cuimhin leat teideal an páipéir úd le >RnaG a luaigh tú? Bhfuil sé le fail ar líne?

Péipeár ginearálta fógra atá ann, le stair an Raidió srl. Fuair mé é cúig bliana ó shin, b’fhéidir, i láithreán an Raidió thuaidh i nDoirí Beaga. Níl ’s agam an bhfuil leagan dó ar fáil ar líne. Is féidir gur hathraíodh é anois fosta.

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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 1885
Registered: 08-2004


Posted on Wednesday, September 07, 2005 - 08:24 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Bheul, níl a suíomh idirlinn fhéin acu níos mó, faraor.

Is beag eolais atá ann anois anseo:
http://www.rte.ie/rnag/stair.html

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Asal_eater
Member
Username: Asal_eater

Post Number: 4
Registered: 08-2005
Posted on Thursday, September 08, 2005 - 03:38 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Chuala mé i gcontae Chill Dara:-

"Thugaim dó cic láidir ina liathróidí" = "I gave him a big kick in the b***cks."

"Fuar!" = "Cool"!

"Táim fuctaithe ar fad" = "I'm shagged out/very tired."

Mo neacht (13 bliana d'aois) atá i gceist.

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Dennis
Member
Username: Dennis

Post Number: 229
Registered: 02-2005


Posted on Thursday, September 08, 2005 - 04:52 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

quote:

"Fuar!" = "Cool"!



Céard faoi Togha!? An bhfuil sé sin aici?

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Dalta
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 83.70.240.222
Posted on Thursday, September 08, 2005 - 06:04 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Go raibh maith agat a Dhennis, bhí mé ag ceapadh roimhe sin faoi fhocal ar 'Cool'.

""Thugaim dó cic láidir ina liathróidí" = "I gave him a big kick in the b***cks." "

Wrong for a number of reasons. But I'm sure there's a real word for 'bollocks', get out that 500 mallacht book and have a look

""Fuar!" = "Cool"! "
I think I heard that on Radio na Life a while back, see Dennis's post.

""Táim fuctaithe ar fad" = "I'm shagged out/very tired.""
Cad faoi 'traochta', an bhfuil Gaeilge ar bith ag an bpáistín seo?

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Maidhc_Ó_g
Member
Username: Maidhc_Ó_g

Post Number: 72
Registered: 05-2005
Posted on Thursday, September 08, 2005 - 06:41 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Bullán : masc. n. 1st decl. - Ábhar tairbh coillte.

Bológ : fem. n. 2nd decl. - Bullán.

An Foclóir Beag.

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Dennis
Member
Username: Dennis

Post Number: 232
Registered: 02-2005


Posted on Thursday, September 08, 2005 - 07:06 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

quote:

cic láidir ina liathróidí
Wrong for a number of reasons.



B'fhéidir é, ach téann "cic" agus "liathróid" le chéile. Is maith liom é dá bhrí sin. Agus is féidir "caideanna" a thabhairt ar mhagairlí: cic sna magairlí, sna caideanna, sa dá chloch/chloich.

Agus ós ag caint faoi "balls" atá muid, is maith liom an líne seo ón bhfile Michael Davitt:

Tá do cheannsa cosúil le liathróid rugbaí
ó bheith sáite suas i do dheireadh

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Dalta
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 83.70.240.222
Posted on Friday, September 09, 2005 - 03:35 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Dhennis, is laoch thú. Thug tú Togha dom agus anois, tá magairlí agus caideanna agam. ...Bhuel, bhí siad agam roimhe sin, ach...

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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 1907
Registered: 08-2004


Posted on Friday, September 09, 2005 - 03:44 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Caid = peil i gCorca Dhuibhne.

Sean scéal grinn. Liathróid peile ag an maistir agus é ag fiafraí "Ca(i)d é seo?



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