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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 2005- » 2005 (May-June) » Archive through May 08, 2005 » "Éireann go brách' vs "Éire go brách" « Previous Next »

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Ralph
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 24.150.222.75
Posted on Friday, April 29, 2005 - 01:37 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I would like your opinion about the following comment:

" 'Ireland Forever' should be written 'Éire go brách'. 'éireann' is the genitive form as in 'muintir na hÉireann' (the people of Ireland ) or Córas Iompar (the Transport System of Ireland."

Is "Éireann go brách" seen or heard most often because it has been North Americanized? Is "Éire go brách" in fact the correct translation of "Ireland Forever". If so, why are so many people accepting of "Éireann go brách"? Educate me please.

Ralph

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Peadar_Ó_gríofa
Member
Username: Peadar_Ó_gríofa

Post Number: 225
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Friday, April 29, 2005 - 02:17 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

In southern Conamara the dative form "Éirinn" is extended to the nominative, so "Éirinn go brách" is correct in that dialect — just as they say "Oscail an fhuinneoig" instead of "Oscail an fhuinneog."

Peadar Ó Gríofa

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Jonas
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Username: Jonas

Post Number: 677
Registered: 08-2004


Posted on Saturday, April 30, 2005 - 09:39 am:   Edit Post Print Post

And not only in Conamara. In Kerry, Éirinn is the form used in normal speech. "Éire" sounds very formal indeed. So "Éirinn go brách" is definitely correct and in no way a corrupted form.

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Dáithí
Member
Username: Dáithí

Post Number: 70
Registered: 01-2005


Posted on Saturday, April 30, 2005 - 03:12 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Please excuse my ignorance, but I've seen the phrase spelled with "bragh," instead of "brách." I remember reading that "bragh" stood for Judgement Day.

Appreciate any comments.

Le meas,

Dáithí

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Dáithí
Member
Username: Dáithí

Post Number: 71
Registered: 01-2005


Posted on Saturday, April 30, 2005 - 03:20 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Please excuse my ignorance, but I've seen the phrase spelled with "bragh." Is "bragh" the same word as "brách?" I remember reading that "bragh" meant "Judgement Day," so I'm just wondering if "brách" also means "Judgement Day," or does it mean "forever," as indicated in Focloir Scoile.

Go raibh maith agaibh,

Dáithí

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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 1314
Registered: 08-2004


Posted on Saturday, April 30, 2005 - 04:03 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Bragh is a transliteration of brách.

"Forever" and "until judgement day" are pretty much the same thing.

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Lughaidh
Member
Username: Lughaidh

Post Number: 278
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Tuesday, May 03, 2005 - 12:48 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Éireann is the genitive, so it means "of Ireland", or "Ireland's". So you can't say "Éireann go brách". As it has been said above, it's Éirinn go brách or Éire go brách.

In order to precise what Aonghas wrote above, "bragh" is an "English" transliteration for brách - trying to write the Irish word with an English spelling.



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