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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 2005- » 2005 (March-April) » Archive through April 19, 2005 » Nose tax? « Previous Next »

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Roy
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 195.212.29.91
Posted on Thursday, April 07, 2005 - 04:28 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Regarding the legend that the Vikings collected tax from the Irish they called "nose tax", what is the Irish equivalent of that expression?

The story tells that if the localers couldn't pay, the cruel Vikings slit their nosetips off...


With regards
Roy

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Fear_na_mbróg
Member
Username: Fear_na_mbróg

Post Number: 485
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Thursday, April 07, 2005 - 04:57 am:   Edit Post Print Post

A word-for-word literal translation would be:

cáin shróine

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Lughaidh
Member
Username: Lughaidh

Post Number: 248
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Friday, April 08, 2005 - 10:52 am:   Edit Post Print Post

cáin sróine (without séimhiú on s in such case). Cáin ghaosáin in Donegal.

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Fear_na_mbróg
Member
Username: Fear_na_mbróg

Post Number: 487
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Saturday, April 09, 2005 - 03:34 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Cén fáth nach séimhítear "sróine"... 'sé mo thuiscint ná go séimhítear "d t s" tar éis "d t s l n" nuair a bhíonn an focal tar éis ainmfhocail -- mar shampla:

bean dheas
cáin shróine

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Lughaidh
Member
Username: Lughaidh

Post Number: 255
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Saturday, April 09, 2005 - 10:04 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Bean dheas in the standard, most of the time "bean deas" in Gaeltacht speech. Séimhiú in the standard on adjectives

Sróine is a noun in the genitive. In speech, a noun in the genitive and that begins with d, t, s is not lenited most of the time if the preceding noun ends in d n t l s. In New Irish Grammar they they it can (they give the example "maidin shamhraidh", but except such examples, i've never seen or heard lenition in such case). Another example that illustrates what i say, in a song from an Rinn (Co. Waterford):

Maidin Domhnaigh 's mé ag dul go hEochaill...

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Fear_na_mbróg
Member
Username: Fear_na_mbróg

Post Number: 488
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Sunday, April 10, 2005 - 03:22 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

So could you have "Scéal Seáin" in place of "Scéal Sheáin"?



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