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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 2005- » 2005 (March-April) » Archive through April 19, 2005 » What did you do today? (Irish + English) #2 « Previous Next »

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Dearg
Member
Username: Dearg

Post Number: 47
Registered: 10-2004


Posted on Tuesday, April 05, 2005 - 03:14 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Well, not today, but a few days ago:

Bhí mé grianghrafadóir cois abhainn.

"I was a photographer by the river."

(Because I don't know how to say, "I took photographs by the river" or "I took photographs of whitewater kayakers on the river.")

http://www.mirandacorp.com/photos/paddling/20050402KettleWow/

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Aonghus
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Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 1236
Registered: 08-2004


Posted on Tuesday, April 05, 2005 - 03:46 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Bhí mé mar ghrianghrafadóir cois abhann



Bhí mé ag glacadh grianghraif cois na habhann




Bhí mé ag glacadh grianghraif de cadhcadoirí uisce gheal ar an abhann.

(That last one is spur of the moment composed, so caution needed)




kayak s (Sp.) cadhc m4 (pl -anna)

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Lughaidh
Member
Username: Lughaidh

Post Number: 246
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Tuesday, April 05, 2005 - 04:48 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

grianghraf has to be in the genitive plural > grianghraf or grianghrafanna(í) (or grianghrafann in Donegal).

on the river > ar an abhainn (abhann is the genitive).

de chadhcadóirí uisce ghil (genitive).


Isn't it a direct translation from English? Especially for "whitewater" ? It looks like an English idiomatic expression (water isn't white!)...

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Dearg
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Username: Dearg

Post Number: 48
Registered: 10-2004


Posted on Tuesday, April 05, 2005 - 04:53 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Go raibh maith agat, a Aonghus.

Literally, "I was as a photographer by the river" ? Interesting.

OK, so "glac" is "take, so "ag glacadh" is "taking". That makes sense. So what causes "cois abhann" to become "cois na habhann" when you add "ag glacadh"?

Ah, "cadhc" is not in my Foclóir Póca. Is that pronounced like kayak or is it more like a one-syllable "kayk"?

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Natalie
Member
Username: Natalie

Post Number: 114
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Tuesday, April 05, 2005 - 06:24 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Ok, it's been a while since we've had one of these conversations so it'd be nice to keep it going.

Bhí ceithre thriail agam inniu ach sílim go ndearna mé go breá. Bíonn Lón uair agus leathuair na laethanta seo mar is dócha go mbeidh na múinteoirí ar stailc anseo gan mhoill. Tá muid sásta.

I had four tests today but I think I did fine. Lunch is an hour and a half these days because the teachers will probably be on strike here soon. We're happy. [i.e. the reason our lunch is an hour and a half is because the teachers are doing this weird little pre-thing before they go on strike...if it ever comes down to that...]

(By the way, I'm cheating and using a dictionary because I could use some practice writing! And I'm only now just realizing as I re-read my sentences how choppy they are in English but that's ok!)

Natalie

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Paul
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 67.101.197.28
Posted on Tuesday, April 05, 2005 - 11:05 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Natalie, a chara,

I'd use "uair go leith" for "an hour and a half."

Is mise, le meas,
Paul

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Seán a' Chaipín
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 83.104.38.8
Posted on Wednesday, April 06, 2005 - 04:44 am:   Edit Post Print Post

You might also say:

Ba ghrianghrafadóir mé cois abhann

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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 1237
Registered: 08-2004


Posted on Wednesday, April 06, 2005 - 05:07 am:   Edit Post Print Post

test (in school) is usually "scrúdú" a Natalie;

Lughaidh, I said I was guessing at "white water" - the white water that kayaks go through is in fact white.

What's it called in French? (Kayaking through rapids in rivers?)

Kayak is an Inuit word, so I think it would be pronounced as in Inuit/English, and cadhc , which I got from http://www.acmhainn.ie is an attempted transliteration.

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Natalie
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Username: Natalie

Post Number: 115
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Wednesday, April 06, 2005 - 05:32 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Go raibh maith agaibh.

Natalie

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Mack
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 12.75.203.21
Posted on Wednesday, April 06, 2005 - 05:39 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Aonghuis - Rapids is fánsruth. Maybe this would be appropriate.

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Philosophe
Member
Username: Philosophe

Post Number: 38
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Thursday, April 07, 2005 - 08:58 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Táim ag an ríomhaire san ollscoil. Bíonn na scamaill atá feicthe agam amuigh tríd an fhuinneog, dorcha, ach nuair a shroich mé an leabharlann maidin inniu bhí dath gorm ar an spéir. Tá boladh humous timpeall na háite-beagán neamhgnách
Ach sin é faoin am sin

I'm at a computer in College. The clouds I can see(but think what I wrote actually meant "that I have seen"?!) outside through the window are dark but when I got to the library this morning the sky was blue. There is a smell of homous around the place-little bit unusual
But that's it for the moment

Hope that wasn't too botched an attempt

much meas
x

ps how do you say "because of something" like,
bhí dorchadas ar an cathair __"because of"__ an aimsir

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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 1244
Registered: 08-2004


Posted on Thursday, April 07, 2005 - 09:03 am:   Edit Post Print Post

de bharr (neutral)
de dheasca (negative)

sin é faoi láthairgo fóill

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Philosophe
Member
Username: Philosophe

Post Number: 39
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Thursday, April 07, 2005 - 09:35 am:   Edit Post Print Post

GRMA
So would "de dheasca" be "despite"?
Bhí mé ag gáire de dheasca an aimsir
I was smiling despite of the weather

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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 1246
Registered: 08-2004


Posted on Thursday, April 07, 2005 - 10:42 am:   Edit Post Print Post

No, sorry. Negative is ambigious. I meant "de dheasca" has negative connotations. (because of something bad = de dheasca)

"in ainneoin" is what you want.

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Philosophe
Member
Username: Philosophe

Post Number: 40
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Thursday, April 07, 2005 - 10:48 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Oh, tuigim :)
go raibh maith agat

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Lughaidh
Member
Username: Lughaidh

Post Number: 249
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Friday, April 08, 2005 - 10:55 am:   Edit Post Print Post

>What's it called in French? (Kayaking through rapids in >rivers?)

du kayak en eaux vives (cadhc in uiscí beo / uiscí gasta, if u translate literally. That sounds a bit strange in Irish as well).

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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 1248
Registered: 08-2004


Posted on Friday, April 08, 2005 - 11:47 am:   Edit Post Print Post

So you don't use whitewater? Interesting. They do in German.

I think "uisce bheo" would be better than "uisce gheal". I don't think one would use the plural.

But I'm sure there is a better way to say it. The word for (water) foam is still escaping me, I'd say it would be best.

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Lughaidh
Member
Username: Lughaidh

Post Number: 252
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Friday, April 08, 2005 - 11:10 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Foam = cúr.

Tá ’s agam nach gcuirfí ’uisce’ san iolraidh, ach tá sé san iolraidh i bhFraincis agus d’aistrigh mé é focal ar fhocal ionas go bhfeice tú cad é atá ann i bhFraincis (munab fhuil Fraincis agat, níl ’s agam).

Whitewater would be "eau blanche" in French, it wouldn't mean anything because water can be white, in French - foam is white, not water. Nobody would understand what "eau blanche" refers to.

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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 1250
Registered: 08-2004


Posted on Saturday, April 09, 2005 - 08:20 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Sin é. Ar chúis éigin is "cúar" a bhí im cheann.

Tá fraincís na scoile agam!

Bhí me ag iarradh leagan ciallmhar a dhéanamh: is maith liom "uisce bheo" seachas "uisce gheal".

Ach fós tá cuma aisteach orthu go léir.

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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 1251
Registered: 08-2004


Posted on Saturday, April 09, 2005 - 08:38 am:   Edit Post Print Post

But I'm not sure.

Whitewater is not exactly only foam: it is agitated water which appears white. (For example, most waterfalls appear white - and that is not foam).


An Béal Beo gives "gaiseadh sruatha" for fast moving water.

Anybody know a gaeltacht kayaker?

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Cailindoll
Member
Username: Cailindoll

Post Number: 52
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Saturday, April 09, 2005 - 07:47 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

b'fhéidir go mbeadh a fhios ag lucht 'uisce.com'!

seoltóireacht sailing
currachóireacht canoeing
seoltóireacht toinne windsurfing
marcaiocht toinne surfing


Uisce is the only centre of its kind in Ireland, mixing adventure sports with Gaeilge in a new, exciting and extremely successful way of learning Irish

The teaching media of windsurfing, surfing, canoeing, sailing, pony trekking, swimming and orienteering takes Irish out of the classroom and gives children a new perspective of the language. In this way Irish itself is being developed by being associated with modern, exciting adventure sports.

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The incentive for students to learn also exists because not only do they return from the Gaeltacht speaking Irish naturally but they also have achieved Level 1 competency and qualififcations in various sports.

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Lughaidh
Member
Username: Lughaidh

Post Number: 254
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Saturday, April 09, 2005 - 09:54 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Aonghais > tá "uisce" firinscneach, mar sin > uisce beo, uisce geal.



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