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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 2005- » 2005 (March-April) » Archive through March 22, 2005 » Broad or slender glottals « Previous Next »

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'dj@ks
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 159.134.221.211
Posted on Saturday, March 19, 2005 - 04:10 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

An bhfuil aon difríocht idir h (caol) agua h (leathan)?
Sampla: maith vs. math

Is there any (audiable) differecne betwixt the h in a slender context and a broad one?

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Jonas
Member
Username: Jonas

Post Number: 658
Registered: 08-2004


Posted on Sunday, March 20, 2005 - 06:38 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Déarfainn féin ná fuil. Is féidir difríocht a dhéanamh idir h caol and h leathan (Béarla: "hue" agus "how") ach tá sé fíor-annamh as Gaelainn.

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Lughaidh
Member
Username: Lughaidh

Post Number: 203
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Sunday, March 20, 2005 - 08:43 am:   Edit Post Print Post

There is only one h sound in Irish. But in the case of
at the end of a (one-syllable) word it's different, because maith, caith etc are pronounced as if they were maich, caith /majx'/, /kajx'/ in Ulster. A slender th at the end of a word can be pronounced as -ich in Ulster.
Otherwise, when it's a real h (not at the end of a word), there's only one sound: thig sé (he comes) and thuig sé (he understood) are pronounced the same way.

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Lughaidh
Member
Username: Lughaidh

Post Number: 204
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Sunday, March 20, 2005 - 08:44 am:   Edit Post Print Post

There is only one h sound in Irish. But in the case of 'th' at the end of a (one-syllable) word it's different, because maith, caith etc are pronounced as if they were maich, caith /majx'/, /kajx'/ in Ulster. A slender th at the end of a word can be pronounced as -ich in Ulster.
Otherwise, when it's a real h (not at the end of a word), there's only one sound: thig sé (he comes) and thuig sé (he understood) are pronounced the same way.

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Jonas
Member
Username: Jonas

Post Number: 659
Registered: 08-2004


Posted on Sunday, March 20, 2005 - 09:14 am:   Edit Post Print Post

The same is also true for An Rinn in Waterford. Slender [h] turns into [x´] in a number of circumstances there.

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'dj@ks
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 159.134.221.97
Posted on Sunday, March 20, 2005 - 10:29 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Thnx 4 de help ladz.

An bhfuil aon daoine eile ag feicáil an bhanda móir ar a taobh dheis? agus a lán focail ó Lughaidh istigh?

Is anyone else getting a formatting problem with the page (Lughaidh's answer is in a big band at the right).

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Lughaidh
Member
Username: Lughaidh

Post Number: 205
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Sunday, March 20, 2005 - 07:50 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Yeah i have that problem as well, it's because i typed "th" between , i think it does strange things. I'm really sorry, i didn't manage to remove that...

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'dj@ks
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 159.134.220.67
Posted on Sunday, March 20, 2005 - 08:19 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Lughaidh,
I did it before once too, but really bad with an orange band around the screen and huge black bands, so it can happen a few ways.

Rinne mé ríomh, ach in olcas. Bhí an banda oráiste timpeall an scáthláin agus bhanda móir dubh.



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