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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 2005- » 2005 (March-April) » Archive through March 22, 2005 » Cúpla Rudaí/Cesiteanna « Previous Next »

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Anthony
Member
Username: Anthony

Post Number: 1
Registered: 03-2005
Posted on Saturday, March 12, 2005 - 11:24 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Dia Daoibh. I'm new to the board and thought I'd throw a few questions out there to see if anyone could help. I'm trying to get back into learning Gaeilge, I've a very basic grasp of the language. I am wondering if there's an expression in Gaeilge for "To whom it may concern", for e-mails etc. Also, I saw a great post on the board for Firefox in Gaeilge and I was wondering if there is any other programmes out there that are available in Gaeilge?

Lastly, I wanted to ask about books and other learning materials. I was wondering if anyone could give me a few names for books etc., that might help me get a better understanding. The area where I have the problem is mostly constructing sentences, I have forgotten most of the rules of the language. My prounciation is rusty but could be helped with some practise and I have a dictionary for the vocab, it's mostly just the rules of the verbs and setting up sentences that I don't know anymore.

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Dáithí
Member
Username: Dáithí

Post Number: 37
Registered: 01-2005


Posted on Sunday, March 13, 2005 - 10:20 am:   Edit Post Print Post

A chara a Anthony,

One way of starting an e-mail is how I have done above, where "A chara" stands for "friend" Addressing more than one person would be "A chairde."

For books, if you haven't done so already, take a look at what Daltaí has on this website. Just go to the "siopa" link at the bottom of this web-page. In terms of constructing sentences, I think by just seeing how basic sentences are formed in books like "Learning Irish" and "Buntús Cainte" you'll get a grasp of it. Another way, I suppose, would be to just focus on the grammatical theory and then someday apply that theory. But, I haven't tried that method. I just know that by looking at the sentences printed in books that have translations into English, it's easy enough to figure out.

I also find that posting a question on grammar on this website often gets a great answer. Not only do you get the answer you wanted, but often members will provide additional information and insight along with the answers. This sharing of information by more advanced and fluent speakers is extremely valuable to beginners like me who want to learn more than just the mechanics of the language.

I hope this helps,

Le meas,

Dáithí

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Lúcas
Member
Username: Lúcas

Post Number: 132
Registered: 01-2004


Posted on Sunday, March 13, 2005 - 10:51 am:   Edit Post Print Post

A Anthony, a chara,

Céad míle fáilte romhat.

"To whom it may concern" seems a bit formal, impersonal, and cold, even for English. Irish idiom, on the other hand, tends, I think, to be more of the opposite; more informal, personal, and warm (sometimes hot!) So rather than give you a word-for-word translation, let me recommend, simply "A Chairde," for e-mails, etc. It means, "Friends."

Rud eile. The word "cúpla" requires a singular noun after it, not plural as in English. It should be "cúpla rud," not "cúpla rudaí."

Go n-éirí an teanga leat.

Mise le meas,

Lúcas

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Mícheál
Member
Username: Mícheál

Post Number: 16
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Sunday, March 13, 2005 - 11:28 am:   Edit Post Print Post

A Anthony, a chara, (should it be, A hAnthony?)

And as a registered member of this listserv, you can go to the Users List to see what is in the Favorite Study Aids category.

By the way, Anthony, if you can, I'd highly recommend going to immersion days to experience great teachers like the ones who post on the this list.

Slán,

Mícheál

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Larry
Member
Username: Larry

Post Number: 27
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Sunday, March 13, 2005 - 02:44 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Mhicheáil, a chara,

>>(should it be, A hAnthony?)

No. The vocative particle does not prefix "h" (or any other letter for that matter) to names beginning with a vowel.

The final consonant of most masculine names is made slender. The final consonant of feminine names is not affected. The initial consonant of both masculine and feminine names is lenited where appropriate.

Le meas,

Larry Ackerman

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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 1123
Registered: 08-2004


Posted on Monday, March 14, 2005 - 05:02 am:   Edit Post Print Post

To whom it may concern:

There is a song "Cad é sin don té sin nach mbaineann sin dó" - what is it to those whom it doesn't concern.


I'd translate it as:

"Dóibh siúd a bhaineann sé leo" - for those who are concerned about it:

"Dóibh siúd a bhfuil spéis acu sa cheist": for those who are interested in the matter.

Somebody who has a copy of "Maidir le do litir" which is a manual of writing formal letters might come up with a better version.

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Seán a' Chaipín
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 83.104.38.8
Posted on Monday, March 14, 2005 - 10:00 am:   Edit Post Print Post

How about:

Don té a bhaineann leis...

To the person it concerns....

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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 1130
Registered: 08-2004


Posted on Monday, March 14, 2005 - 10:49 am:   Edit Post Print Post

That would mean "For the person who belongs to it"



baint le (cur isteach ar, teagmháil do; ceangal nó gnó a bheith ag rud le rud eile (ní bhaineann sé liom)).

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Seanog
Member
Username: Seanog

Post Number: 14
Registered: 03-2005
Posted on Friday, March 18, 2005 - 07:59 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Atá bainte leis = associated with?

Sin an rud a d'fhoghlaim mise...

- Seán Ó Treasaigh

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Fear_na_mbróg
Member
Username: Fear_na_mbróg

Post Number: 465
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Saturday, March 19, 2005 - 02:11 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

quote:

Rud eile. The word "cúpla" requires a singular noun after it, not plural as in English. It should be "cúpla rud," not "cúpla rudaí."



Another thing, it's (strangely) followed by the nominative case -- as opposed to the genetive. Take "deoch" for example:

a lán dí

ach:

cúpla deoch

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Seanog
Member
Username: Seanog

Post Number: 17
Registered: 03-2005
Posted on Saturday, March 19, 2005 - 02:36 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I hate the bloody genetive. Writing it is one thing, you have time to think about it, but talking with fluency is another thing!

- Seán Ó Treasaigh

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SMcS
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 83.70.247.201
Posted on Saturday, March 19, 2005 - 11:26 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Don't think about it when your talking. When you're learning a word make sure to put it into a sentence expressing each case and say them a number of times. You can use your computer to remind you of your latest words. Then try find an excuse for using them in e-mail/conversation or whatever. BUT WHEN YOU DO SO, MAKE SURE TO TAKE THE OPPORTUNITY TO REPEAT SAYING YOUR SAMPLE SENTENCES even if you are only typing them so that you have and oral & aural memory of it in context.

As I study French I have imaginary conversations with imaginary people just to use the words I'm learning in an oral/aural context. Your family will think you mad but you'll be able to speak the language with fluency.

If you must think about it give yourself time. How you say. By finding out how Irish speakers pad. People pad in every language for time to think.

Everything from throwing in a "Ar ndóigh" to a "De réir mar a fheictear dom" you name it. Remember also what seems a long time to you is often no more than an appropriate pause to someone else.



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