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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 2005- » 2005 (January-February) » Archive through February 28, 2005 » Bustús Cainte going cheap. Roll up! Roll up! « Previous Next »

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'dj@ks
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 213.190.137.221
Posted on Wednesday, February 23, 2005 - 10:28 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Welcome folks to ye olde gaelick shoppe!

Hark! Today verily I did spie and made for meself all 3 of that venerable line and with neu CD dans l'accompagnement in that procurer of booken en Daws Sons street, Duublan 2

Offerz: @ Hoggis Figgis, Dawson Street
Buntús Cainte: not 1, not 2, but all 3 togedder in one go, and with CDs included. Begone olde tape!

A warning upon you:
doz nice peopul at Conradh na Gaeilge bade me look ajar at the offer lest the governance of the realm come upon me...for it is sold in dem shoppes with nay a taxx. Yes king Bertie the 1st has a retained tax in it, which the fiendz du flauent!

Basically, buy the series for €20.65 in hoggis figgis and pay €45 less than one would do on tape, and €5 euro less than in Conradh na Gaeilge. Why is that? Because HF are business people, and no one should pay a premium to learn the other offical langue of the state.

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Fear_na_mbróg
Member
Username: Fear_na_mbróg

Post Number: 444
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Wednesday, February 23, 2005 - 10:31 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Why do so many people say "langue" on this forum?

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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 996
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Wednesday, February 23, 2005 - 10:41 am:   Edit Post Print Post

So many? Jakes (or whatever he's calling himself today) seems to be the only one who uses it as a synonym for language.

It's a technical term, it seems (from dictionary.com):

langue

language

(Message edited by aonghus on February 23, 2005)

(Message edited by aonghus on February 23, 2005)

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Philosophe
Member
Username: Philosophe

Post Number: 28
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Wednesday, February 23, 2005 - 11:35 am:   Edit Post Print Post

tis french is it not?

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Lughaidh
Member
Username: Lughaidh

Post Number: 130
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Wednesday, February 23, 2005 - 12:47 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Langue = both "tongue" (in the mouth) and "language" in French.

I didn't know that "langue" did exist in English before Jakes wrote it.

In French, "langage" (from which the English word "language" comes) has a more general meaning, it can be used for any mean of communication (computer language like html etc, animals' languages, etc).

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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 1000
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Wednesday, February 23, 2005 - 02:24 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

It has the same broad meaning in English.

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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 1001
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Wednesday, February 23, 2005 - 02:26 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Jakes' posts are peppered with linguistic jargon, whcih is why I went to look up "langue" - I've never heard it used before.

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Mack
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 12.75.184.173
Posted on Wednesday, February 23, 2005 - 05:42 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Sometimes it's difficult to know what he's saying. Maybe he should come out of the jakes.

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'dj@ks
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 159.134.221.137
Posted on Wednesday, February 23, 2005 - 06:04 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

"Maybe he should come out of the jakes."
-Mack
Do you mean 'japes', that old colloquial term for joking about in England? Popular in the Beano, I recall.

As for my spelling of 'langue' it is French, and a throwback to a summer I spent there and the result of speaking no English till I returned; a sort of interlarding in writing became habit, such as 'more good' (plus bon) as opposed to the native adjective 'better'. But really its only a small habit.

The point of the post was that the complete series of Buntús Cainte is now out on CD. Another thread covered the issue of courses on CD and the transference to mp3 for the Zen or iPOD etc.

Since I seen it today, I bought it, and for less than I paid for the BC 1 with double tape last year. The lady at C na G had a go at me when I mentioned the price differntial between them and a store down the road. She lambasted me for not paying the price of €4.50 more. I asked who said so. The goverment she replied. Since the Irish government provides no services for its €45 Billion take in (yes small by American standards) I am not to keen to throw more down its black hole gullet. Anyway the tax was dis-ensentive either way -less buy it and and it ads nothing to the langue.

In retrospect it was a daft bastard of a post.

PS it is only a handle, and is kinds like d'@cs

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Dearg
Member
Username: Dearg

Post Number: 40
Registered: 10-2004


Posted on Thursday, February 24, 2005 - 12:54 am:   Edit Post Print Post

> Anyway the tax was dis-ensentive either way

disincentive? Sometimes in this forum it's hard to know what's a typo and what's just over my head. :-)

> iPOD

It's just iPod. (And for anyone who cares, Apple makes Macs, not MACs)

I feel better already. ;-)

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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 1003
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Thursday, February 24, 2005 - 05:41 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Perhaps you're not privy to the common meaning of Jakes, Jakes?

http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=jakes

Your concern for the purity of other people's Irish is a source of amusement, certainly, since you put the english language through the hoops.

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'dj@ks
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 159.134.220.238
Posted on Thursday, February 24, 2005 - 12:43 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Aonghus,
"Perhaps you're not privy to the common meaning of Jakes, Jakes?"

Yes toilets are 'jacks'. Opps. Oh thats stinks...

"disincentive?"
-Dearg

Whats wrong with that? In the semantics of how I use English 'lack of incentive' feels like a cronic lack of desire or push to act. 'Disincentive' on the other hand, is more actual, more active, and suggest 'working to discourage'. I've heard it used in Ireland many times, to feel it to be grand (thats menas 'OK').

iPod/iPOD: guilty as charged!

"Your concern for the purity of other people's Irish is a source of amusement, certainly, since you put the english language through the hoops."
-Aonghus

I'm not in the slightest biy worried how people learn their Irish, I'm interested just on how the langue might change. A faire point none the less, Aonghus. Manglering iz funn

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glór ón taobh amuigh
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 69.229.190.161
Posted on Thursday, February 24, 2005 - 04:58 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Manglering iz funn

But itz badd, so you tellum, Jæx, nuffin but de fæx, but do be goode and phwatsch yer tonguage, bye!

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Ó_diocháin
Member
Username: Ó_diocháin

Post Number: 92
Registered: 09-2004
Posted on Friday, February 25, 2005 - 02:27 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A chairde,
Mar eolas daoibh.
The terms "langue" and "parole" came into English as technical terms in linguistics as a result of the first English translation of the Swiss linguist Ferdinand de Saussure's 1916 work Cours de linguistique général using the original French words.
Other than in the technical sense, I have never come across langue used in English until the posts by 'dj@ks
on this forum.
On a purely personal note, I like his use of the term.
Slán beo!
Chris



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