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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 2005- » 2005 (January-February) » Archive through February 28, 2005 » Two announcements « Previous Next »

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Antaine
Member
Username: Antaine

Post Number: 231
Registered: 10-2004


Posted on Sunday, February 20, 2005 - 10:56 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

two announcements friends from the Esopus weekend expressed interest in:


FIRST:
for my fiddle friends, those gut strings come from
www.gamutstrings.com
and are diameters
E - .60 mm treble gut
A - .80 mm treble gut
D - 1.08 mm lyon gut
G - 1.50 mm lyon gut
ordered separately...not sets


SECOND:
my brother is a composition/conducting major who has studied at Montclair S.U. and the Moscow Conservatory. He has written an entire evening's worth of music and will be conducting the orchestra and ensembles. He has written my uilleann pipes into the orchestra for one of the pieces. It will be
Wed, 2 Mar 2005 at 8pm
Montclair State University (exit 151 or 153b on the GSP)
McEachern Music Building Recital Hall (*not* Kassar Theater or Memorial Auditorium)
Admission is free as is the reception afterwards. All are welcome to attend.

(Message edited by antaine on February 20, 2005)

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James
Member
Username: James

Post Number: 124
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Monday, February 21, 2005 - 09:16 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Go raibh maith agat! I was going to go on-line today to try to find those strings! Perfect timing my friend...!

Sadly, I won't be able to attend your concert. It's a bit of a drive, you know. I'm sure it will be a wonderful event, though!

Le meas,

James

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Antaine
Member
Username: Antaine

Post Number: 233
Registered: 10-2004


Posted on Monday, February 21, 2005 - 09:48 am:   Edit Post Print Post

go ndéannaí maith duit, agus go n-éirí an t-adh leat le téada fidle

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Lughaidh
Member
Username: Lughaidh

Post Number: 125
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Tuesday, February 22, 2005 - 12:43 am:   Edit Post Print Post

"go ndéanaí a mhaith duit" is the right form. Thank u for using that nice sentence who's getting less and less used: most of the time, learners are taught "fáilte romhat", that is an ugly anglicism - we 've already talked about that on another thread.

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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 982
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Tuesday, February 22, 2005 - 04:15 am:   Edit Post Print Post

And it is not proven that it is an ugly anglicism, since we have established that it has been in use for over 80 years, and possibly much longer.

Since when have you been a greater authority on Irish than Niall Ó Donaill and Tomás de Bhaldraithe?

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Mack
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Posted From: 12.75.255.114
Posted on Tuesday, February 22, 2005 - 07:43 am:   Edit Post Print Post

GRMA a Aonghus - Every Irish born Gaelgeoir I know uses that, it's in novels, dictionaries, soap operas and even good old Buntus Cainte. Being non-Irish makes Lughaidh an authority on everything Irish.

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Fear_na_mbróg
Member
Username: Fear_na_mbróg

Post Number: 440
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Tuesday, February 22, 2005 - 08:23 am:   Edit Post Print Post

englishirishdictionary.com gives this:

thank you - you're welcome go raibh maith agat - níl a bhuíochas ort or tá fáilte romhat;

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Antaine
Member
Username: Antaine

Post Number: 235
Registered: 10-2004


Posted on Tuesday, February 22, 2005 - 08:57 am:   Edit Post Print Post

sorry for the typos...i was tired

thank you for appreciation of the phrase

but lets not open this can of worms again...

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Fear_na_mbróg
Member
Username: Fear_na_mbróg

Post Number: 441
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Tuesday, February 22, 2005 - 09:25 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Well I supose you could argue this either way... but there's no denying that "tá fáilte romhat" does have a logical meaning --

fáilte = "welcome". If some-one is welcome in a certain place or at a certain event, then not only are they just tolerated there, but their presence is liked.

In response to some-one expressing their appreciation or gratitude to you, it sort of does make sense to say "tá fáilte romhat" because you're sort of saying "Oh yeah, it's grand, your presence is liked..." if you know what I mean, so it's not just an ugly anglicism, if that's even where it came from.

I was in the presence of a few Irish speaking people recently and, although they spoke in Irish, they regularly said what I heard to be "fair play dhuit". Is that what I was hearing or was it something like:

féar plé dhúit

I'm curious -- because if it's English I won't be saying it!

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Seosamh Mac Muirí
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 193.1.100.105
Posted on Tuesday, February 22, 2005 - 11:22 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Tá tú ag gabháil amú agus solas faighte agat cheana a Lughaidh:
['go ndéanaí a mhaith duit" is the right form. Thank u for using that nice sentence who's getting less and less used: most of the time, learners are taught "fáilte romhat", that is an ugly anglicism - we 've already talked about that on another thread.]

Is fíor duit gur cíoradh an scéal seo cheana ach is cosúil nár oscail tú súil na hintinne lena shú isteach i gceart an t-am sin. Is éard a thugas le fios i mbeagán focal cheana, an méid seo a leanas:

Is i dTír Chonaill a tharla an t-athrú. The change occured in Donegal and not vice versa.
In Donegal 'go ndéanaí a mhaith duit' moved semantically from 'bon appetit' to 'you're welcome'.
'Bí súch'/'Bígí súch' has appeared in Donegal to cover 'bon appetit'.

Maireann 'go ndéanaí a mhaith duit' mar 'bon appetit' i gConamara i gcónaí.
'Go ndéanaí a mhaith duit' has remained in Conamara up to the present for 'bon appetit'.
(There, in Conamara, 'tá fáilte romhat' covers the area formerly occupied by 'fo chen duit/mochen duit'.)

An té a rachfas ag tochailt poill le haghaidh ugly anglicisms, nó aon deamhan eile, cuimhníodh freisin gur fearr fanacht i dtaobh na stuaime agus gan dream foghlaimeoirí a shaighdeadh amú ar comhchonair leis féin. Ní miste a chuimhneamh nach mbítear mar a shíltear.

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Lughaidh
Member
Username: Lughaidh

Post Number: 126
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Tuesday, February 22, 2005 - 02:58 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Char úrt mé gurb é "go ndéanaí a mhaith duit" an leagan is fearr: d’úrt mé go rabh sé níos fearr ná "tá fáilte romhat" mar gur Béarlachas atá ann seo. Scríobh mé "go ndéanaí a mhaith duit" is the right form" agus ar intinn agam gurb é seo ’n dóigh cheart le hé a litriú (rinn Antaine cupla meancóg litrithe), sin a’ méid.

>Is i dTír Chonaill a tharla an t-athrú. The change occured in Donegal and not vice versa.
>In Donegal 'go ndéanaí a mhaith duit' moved semantically from 'bon appetit' to 'you're welcome'.
>'Bí súch'/'Bígí súch' has appeared in Donegal to cover 'bon appetit'.

Bhuel cha rabh ’s agam sin, go rabh maith agat. Ach tá cead ag na nathannaí cainte ciall a dh’athrú, rud normálta atá ann. IS Gaeilg i gcónaí é. Ní Gaeilg ródheas liom "tá fáilte romhat" ins an chás sin. Dá mbainfí feidhm as aistriúchán ón Bhéarla le achan cor cainte a ráidht i nGaeilg, is dóigh liom go gcaillfidh ’n Ghaeilg an chuid is fearr daoithe.

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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 989
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Tuesday, February 22, 2005 - 06:06 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Ach níl sé cruthaite, ná baol air, gur lom aistriú atá i "tá fáilte romhat" mar fhreagra ar "go raibh maith agat".

Tá nós an Bhéarla, na Gaeilge agus na Breatnaise "fáilte" a rá bun os cionn le mórán gach teanga eorpach eile, ina bhfuil "le'd thoil" mar gnáth fhreagra air "go raibh maith agat".

Mar sin, cén fianaise atá agat nach ón nGaeilge a tháinig an nath isteach sa Bhéarla?



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