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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 2005- » 2005 (March-April) » Archive through March 11, 2005 » Sure Need Some Help on Words & Phrases « Previous Next »

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Wolfen
Member
Username: Wolfen

Post Number: 1
Registered: 02-2005
Posted on Friday, February 18, 2005 - 04:25 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I am at the bottom of the barrel... on the Irish Language... first... is Gaelic Irish or Scottish??... see what I mean......

I sure would like to know how to spell and say "Cypress" and "Texas"

I have a lot of friends with Irish roots and we do not have a clue about the language..... so here I am.... we also have a riding club... "Harley-Davidson" and we thought it would be nice to start writing in the Irish language......

Any help or hope out there for me....

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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 965
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Saturday, February 19, 2005 - 07:54 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Cypress (the tree) is cufróg, genitive cupraisc

Cyprus (the mediterranean Island) is An Chipir.

Texas: I don't know what the official Irish version is, and I'd rather not guess.

I see these Texans have left the "x" (which otherwise is not in Irish) and added an "i"

http://www.geocities.com/Broadway/Alley/9105/


http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Olympus/3728/

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Kay
Member
Username: Kay

Post Number: 29
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Saturday, February 19, 2005 - 11:01 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Gearóid Ó Cairealláin translates Texas as Teicseas in an article in Lá.
http://www.nuacht.com/story/?cat_id=3&newsid=5836 . You say that the same as you say Texas.


¥ou will find lots of Irish words and how to use them in http://www.gaeilgenaseachtaine.com

You'll find out a bit about genitives there too.

All you have to do is register. Just click the register link on the left of the page and then just fill in your name and username and password.

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Peadar_Ó_gríofa
Member
Username: Peadar_Ó_gríofa

Post Number: 151
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Saturday, February 19, 2005 - 04:59 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

"Cypress (the tree) is cufróg, genitive cupraisc"

Aonghus was probably a little sleepy or in a hurry when he posted that. What he means is that there are two Irish names for the tree:

cufróg, whose genitive singular is cufróige.

cupraisc, whose genitive singular is cupraisce.

Peadar Ó Gríofa

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Peadar_Ó_gríofa
Member
Username: Peadar_Ó_gríofa

Post Number: 152
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Saturday, February 19, 2005 - 05:23 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

is Gaelic Irish or Scottish??

Yes. The Scottish Gaels are of Irish origin, and for many centuries the Gaelic of Ireland and that of Scotland continued to be treated as a single language with a common literary standard; but by the seventeenth century the dialects had diverged far enough so that the degree of mutual intelligibility was significantly reduced, and it was undeniable that Irish and Scottish Gaelic had developed distinct, separate standards.

As the old saw says, "It's not quite so cut and dried, but that's it in a nutshell."

Peadar Ó Gríofa

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'dj@ks
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 159.134.221.126
Posted on Sunday, February 20, 2005 - 09:02 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Cór Gaeilge Texais

Tecsas/Tecsais?

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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 967
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Sunday, February 20, 2005 - 11:30 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Errare Humanum Est.

Sleepy and confused was I.

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Kay
Member
Username: Kay

Post Number: 33
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Monday, February 21, 2005 - 07:20 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Ná bí buartha a Aonghuis mar a deir an seanfhocal " tuigeann fear léinn leathfhocal!

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Seosamh Mac Muirí
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 193.1.100.105
Posted on Monday, February 21, 2005 - 09:17 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Mar dhánfhocal chomh maith a chairde:

Dlíonn an daoi tiús teagaisc,
's tearc teagasc ón tsaoi treorach,
tuigeann fear léinn leathfhocal,
'gus is leor nod don eolach.

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Antaine
Member
Username: Antaine

Post Number: 232
Registered: 10-2004


Posted on Monday, February 21, 2005 - 09:46 am:   Edit Post Print Post

technically, irish, scottish and manx are all "gaelic" as they are all on the gaelic brance of the celtic family tree. all started out as the same language.

in the intervening centuries, they became three different languages.

if you call a language "gaelic" it is assumed you are talking about scottish, unless you are referring to the linguistic classification of any of those three.

but most people never get that deep...if you call them "irish" and "scottish" and "manx" then you will never have confusion save for those who think irish is an accent and not a language but sin scéal eile...

as for texas...I would imagine that most US states and Canadian provinces have official unofficial translations. There are those who say there is no need whatsoever to translate non-irish placenames such as that. exceptions would be states like new york or new jersey, as york is an ancient city that already had a name in irish and jersey is one of the channel islands that also due to its proximity to Ireland had an irish name.

you can probably use a state translation without too much confusion, but i wouldn't try to translate a city name (eg. Houston, Austen, Ft. Worth, Dallas, etc) unless it is already an ancient city name (eg Paris = Paras)

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Wolfen
Member
Username: Wolfen

Post Number: 2
Registered: 02-2005
Posted on Monday, February 21, 2005 - 11:20 am:   Edit Post Print Post

... thanks everyone for your input and help... I can tell this is going to be interesting....

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Kay
Member
Username: Kay

Post Number: 35
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Monday, February 21, 2005 - 11:54 am:   Edit Post Print Post

A Sheosaimh, a chara,



Ar mhiste leat a insint dúinn cad é foinse an dánfhocal sin?

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Wolfen
Member
Username: Wolfen

Post Number: 3
Registered: 02-2005
Posted on Monday, February 21, 2005 - 12:18 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Kay... can I ask you to write down in english what you are saying in Irish Gaelic.... sure would help me in the understanding better..... thanks

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Seosamh Mac Muirí
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 193.1.100.105
Posted on Monday, February 21, 2005 - 01:33 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

An leabhar seo a Kay: http://www.litriocht.com/shop/product_info.php?cPath=48&products_id=3110

Fuaireas blianta ó shin é, mar bhronntanas, agus d'fhoghlaim roinnt de ghlanmheabhair as. Bhí roinnt díobh cloiste agam ó dhaoine eile cheana féin. (Fuaireas ceann amháin amach as fótóchóip lse. sula bhfaca mé sa leabhar sin é! uimh. 105) Chíoras agus chóiríos iad do mo shásamh féin tuairim is deich mbliain ó shin agus éistim leo ar téip, b'fhéidir uair sa bhliain, le slacht a chur orm féin nuair a bhraithim go dteastaíonn a leithéid d'instealladh uaim!

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Kay
Member
Username: Kay

Post Number: 36
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Monday, February 21, 2005 - 01:37 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Wolfen,

I like to use Irish as much as possible. I used Irish replying to people I know understand what I am saying. When I was replying to you I used English.

I have a lot on my site (http://www.gaeilgenaseachtaine.com ) to help you get to understand Irish better and I am working on it most of the day. I really like coming to Daltai and exchanging a message or two in Irish without having to translate, it is a pleasant break from work.

Please bear with me. Good luck with learning Irish.

Kay.

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Kay
Member
Username: Kay

Post Number: 37
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Monday, February 21, 2005 - 03:12 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Go raibh maith agat a Sheosaimh,

Ba dheas an bronntanas leabhar mar sin a fháil.

An bhfuil aon phlean agat an téip a luann tú a chur ar diosca agus a lansáil ar an mhargadh? Bhéadh sin go h-iontach.

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Wolfen
Member
Username: Wolfen

Post Number: 4
Registered: 02-2005
Posted on Tuesday, February 22, 2005 - 11:16 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Kay... I understand and thanks again... will be visiting your site.......

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Wolfen
Member
Username: Wolfen

Post Number: 5
Registered: 02-2005
Posted on Wednesday, February 23, 2005 - 01:08 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

... got a couple more words.... that I sure would like to know how to spell them in Irish Gaelic.... Striker and Wolfen.... as always... THANKS

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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 1004
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Thursday, February 24, 2005 - 05:47 am:   Edit Post Print Post

This is tricky out of context.

Do you mean Striker as in Football, or as in person who strikes?

Wolfen as in "like a wolf"?

I have to tell you that a direct translation of either will sound very odd in Irish.

Perhaps you could tell us more about the context? This is still for the bikers club, right?

The common word for Wolf is "mac tíre", but Faolchú - wild hound - is also used.

So perhaps Faolchúach might serve for Wolfen.

Strike - buille
Striker could be translated "buailteoir" - but it would be odd.

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Wolfen
Member
Username: Wolfen

Post Number: 6
Registered: 02-2005
Posted on Thursday, February 24, 2005 - 05:47 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

... both Striker and Wolfen are "road names"... yes for the bike club... we would like to print everything in Irish that goes on our jackets....

.... so I guess they would be considered proper names..? but there again... yes.... Wolfen is defined as you thought.... "like a wolf"... does that help on that one?

... Striker's name comes from a snake that he got bit by... a coral snake..! and yes he lived to tell about it.... after a lot of needless pain in the hospital.... I told him to leave it alone... but he learned the hard way.... how he has been given the "road name" Striker.......

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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 1008
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Thursday, February 24, 2005 - 06:20 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I suggest

Faolchúach for wolfen

Striker is trickier. I take it his moniker comes from the property of the snake to strike quickly?

Tapaíoch is a Connemara word for someone who is fast worker.
Scafaire is another such.
(Both from an Béal Beo).

Perhaps someone else may have a better idea.

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Aonghus
Member
Username: Aonghus

Post Number: 1014
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Friday, February 25, 2005 - 05:05 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Another possiblity for striker is

Buailteach

which I found in Dineen (and can be used for people)
It carries overtones of being aggressive, though.


buailteach [aidiacht den chéad díochlaonadh]
trodach, béimneach.

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Wolfen
Member
Username: Wolfen

Post Number: 7
Registered: 02-2005
Posted on Tuesday, March 01, 2005 - 11:48 am:   Edit Post Print Post

... as always...... thank you all for your assistance... we have a ride coming up this weekend to Louisiana... going to eat so crawfish and drink a few beers... bet I will get some strange looks on (trying to)speaking what I am learning........

... is there anyway of hearing these words from someone that knows how to correctly speak them... to see if I am close to the same..?

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Wolfen
Member
Username: Wolfen

Post Number: 8
Registered: 02-2005
Posted on Tuesday, March 01, 2005 - 11:53 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Aonghus... went to your web-site and.. whow!.. over my head.... looks great... just wish I knew what you were saying... have a great one.......!!



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